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Germany

Currency:

€ Euro
Capital:
Area:357,021 km2
Languages: German, Danish (in Schleswig-Holstein), Lower Sorbian (in Brandenburg), North Frisian (in Schleswig-Holstein), Saterland Frisian (in Lower Saxony), Upper Sorbian (in Saxony), German Sign Language, Low German
: German, Danish (in Schleswig-Holstein), Lower Sorbian (in Brandenburg), North Frisian (in Schleswig-Holstein), Saterland Frisian (in Lower Saxony), Upper Sorbian (in Saxony), German Sign Language, Low German
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Brandenburg Gate
The Brandenburg Gate is one of the most iconic sights in today’s vibrant Berlin. More than just Berlin’s only surviving historical city gate, this site came to symbolise Berlin’s Cold War division into East and West – and, since the fall of the Wall, a reunified Germany. Architecturally, the sandstone Brandenburg Gate also represents one of the earliest and most attractive examples of a neo-classical building in Germany. Constructed between 1788 and 1791, the Brandenburg Gate was Berlin’s first Greek revival building. Designed by Carl Gotthard Langhans, architect to the Prussian court, it was inspired by the monumental gateway at the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. The Brandenburg Gate is 26 metres high, 65.5 metres long and 11 metres deep, and supported by two rows of six Doric columns. In 1793, the gate was crowned by the Quadriga statue, designed by Johann Gottfried Schadow. This statue also has its own story to tell. In 1806, when Napoleon’s army took Berlin, the French Emperor had the Quadriga transported to Paris as war booty and a sign of his victory. In 1814, after Napoleon’s forced abdication, the Quadriga was returned to Berlin where it once again adorned the Brandenburg Gate, facing towards the east and the city centre.
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Pergamon Museum
The Pergamonmuseum is nothing short of a wonder in itself. Its rooms are overflowing with some of the world’s most impressive, long buried, treasures. The museum encompasses the vast history of the Ancient East, with collections that can not be experienced elsewhere. The museum is named after the Pergamon Altar, a Hellenistic masterpiece of white stone architecture. The imposing structure invites you to walk the steps of 2000 years of history and behold its intricacies close-up. But don’t get lost in this wonder for too long, as there are many more under the museum’s roof. Artefacts have been gathered from Iran, Asia Minor, Egypt and the Caucasus, and these worlds have been recreated for you to explore within the Pergamonmuseum.
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Olympic Park
At Olympiaberg in Munich, every skier can find just the right slope. The highest hill in the city offers a variety of options for descending: gently descending slopes for everyone who wants to learn to ski and bobsled, and steep descents for those who like to fly across the snow. The Olympic Park in northern Munich is well known beyond the borders of the capital city. The unique tent architecture of the buildings and the Olympic Tower are some of Munich’s well known landmarks. After the Olympic Games in 1972, a 300-hectare-sized park was developed into a recreation center for the entire city. Joggers, cyclists, and walkers take their laps here, and swimmers do lengths in the Olympic swimming facility. At over 50 meters (150 feet) high, the Olympic Hill towers over the park grounds and is an ideal spot to enjoy a view of the roofs of Munich and to the mountains beyond.
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Water Tower
Without doubt, the most popular landmark for all Mannheimers is the water tower "Wasserturm". No wonder it serves as the backdrop to so many wedding and holiday photos. Romantic and dreamy, it stands in one of the most beautiful Art Nouveau sites in Europe. Its fountains, promenades and arcades are a popular meeting place for locals and visitors alike. You get the best view of the water tower from one of the surrounding cafés on the Friedrichsplatz. Sitting under the arcades sipping a cup of coffee is guaranteed to give you a Mediterranean feeling. On summer evenings, you can marvel at the water fountain choreography. In the winter, the Christmas market around the Wasserturm is worth a visit too.
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East Side Gallery
At 1316 metres long, the open-air art gallery on the banks of the Spree in Friedrichshain is the longest continuous section of the Berlin Wall still in existence. Immediately after the wall came down, 118 artists from 21 countries began painting the East Side Gallery, and it officially opened as an open air gallery on 28 September 1990. Just over a year later, it was given protected memorial status. In more than a hundred paintings on what was the east side of the wall, the artists commented on the political changes in 1989/90. Some of the works at the East Side Gallery are particularly popular, such as Dmitri Vrubel’s Fraternal Kiss and Birgit Kinders’s Trabant breaking through the wall. They are not just a popular subject for postcards – you’re sure to want to photograph them yourself.
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Kurfuerstendamm
No trip to Berlin is complete without a stroll down Kurfürstendamm. Berlin’s most popular shopping boulevard is the beating heart of the western city centre. Kurfürstendamm is Berlin’s most famous and popular shopping boulevard and is the heart of the western city centre. You’re sure to enjoy a successful shopping trip there. The 3.5-kilometre-long boulevard takes you from Breitscheidplatz and the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedächtniskirche to Rathenauplatz, where the Grunewald villas begin. Breitscheidplatz is where Kurfürstendamm officially begins; before that the street is called Tauentzienstraße. This runs into Wittenbergplatz, where you will find the legendary KaDeWe – Berlin’s most famous department store, which everyone associates with Kurfürstendamm, even though, technically, it isn’t on it.
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English Garden
"The Englische Garten (“English Garden”) is one of the largest urban parks in the world. The layout has undergone constant change throughout the centuries as new buildings and green spaces were added time and again.
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Old Town Hall and St. Sebastian Church
The baroque backdrop for the market held here three times a week is formed by the ensemble of the old town hall and the parish church of St. Sebastian - which is incidentally Mannheim's oldest building. If you happen to lose track of time in the hustle and bustle of the market, two clocks and a bell tower are on hand to bring you back to the here and now. What's more, a glockenspiel sounds from the tower three times a day, charming more people than merely the wedding couple exchanging vows inside the walls. You can immerse yourself in Mannheim's internationality directly behind the marketplace. The predominantly Turkish-influenced district with its small shops and delicacies like baklava and pide can easily turn your thoughts to your next holiday. The huge selection of bridal and evening wear on offer here draws customers from over 150 kilometers away.
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Charlottenburg Palace
Discover the magic of the rococo at the beautiful Charlottenburg Palace – once a royal summer residence, today Berlin’s largest and most magnificent palace. In the Neuer Flügel (New Wing), you can view the staterooms and the rococo ballroom known as the Goldene Galerie (Golden Gallery). The Silver Vault includes quite stunning tableware of gold, silver, glass and porcelain displayed on laid tables. Around 100 table services have survived intact, a vivid reminder of the magnificence of dining at court. The impressive display of the remaining pieces of the Prussian crown jewels, complete with the imperial insignias, as well as personal treasures, such as the elaborated designed, exquisite snuffboxes collected by Friedrich the Great, are also well worth seeing. The Porcelain Cabinet in the Old Palace offers a breathtaking collection of the finest blue-and-white porcelain decorating the entire room.
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Alexanderplatz
Alexanderplatz has always been one of the liveliest places in Berlin, with shops, cinemas, restaurants, and many attractions within walking distance. Alexanderplatz in Mitte is one of the best-known public squares in Berlin – and it’s certainly the biggest. Named after Tsar Alexander I, who visited the Prussian capital in 1805, most people simply call it Alex. Also in the winter you will find several Christmas markets at Alexanderplatz: at the Rotes Rathaus, at the Alexa shopping centre and around the world clock.
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Luisenpark
The Luisenpark is divided in an upper and a lower part. The lower Luisenpark is the oldest part of the park, and entry is free. The upper Luisenpark charges an admission fee, but it also has a lot more to offer. Drift lazily in gondolettas on the Kutzerweiher lake, climb over the stones in the mountain stream and experience a real Chinese tea ceremony. In the conservatory, you can discover not only tropical plants but also hundreds of species of colourful butterflies as well as fish, monkeys, crocodiles and many other exotic animals. Outside you will find cows, sheep, guinea pigs, storks, flamingos and more. The daily feeding of the penguins is quite the spectacle. Don't miss it! The park has many different playgrounds. Climbing, swinging, sliding, digging, and trampoline jumping — kids will love it! Parents can lounge on the free-to-use deck chairs. There are various restaurants, cafés, and kiosks in the park, but you can also bring your own food and beverages.
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Main Tower (incl. Observation Platform)
The Main Tower, designed by the architect's office Schweger und Partner and completed in 2000, invites the general public to visit its rooftop observation platform, where they are met by a spectacular panoramic view of Frankfurt and the surrounding region some 200 metres above the city streets. A highlight for every urban explorer!