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Germany

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Currency:

€ Euro
Capital:
Area:357,021 km2
Languages: German, Danish (in Schleswig-Holstein), Lower Sorbian (in Brandenburg), North Frisian (in Schleswig-Holstein), Saterland Frisian (in Lower Saxony), Upper Sorbian (in Saxony), German Sign Language, Low German
: German, Danish (in Schleswig-Holstein), Lower Sorbian (in Brandenburg), North Frisian (in Schleswig-Holstein), Saterland Frisian (in Lower Saxony), Upper Sorbian (in Saxony), German Sign Language, Low German
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Brandenburg Gate
The Brandenburg Gate is one of the most iconic sights in today’s vibrant Berlin. More than just Berlin’s only surviving historical city gate, this site came to symbolise Berlin’s Cold War division into East and West – and, since the fall of the Wall, a reunified Germany. Architecturally, the sandstone Brandenburg Gate also represents one of the earliest and most attractive examples of a neo-classical building in Germany. Constructed between 1788 and 1791, the Brandenburg Gate was Berlin’s first Greek revival building. Designed by Carl Gotthard Langhans, architect to the Prussian court, it was inspired by the monumental gateway at the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. The Brandenburg Gate is 26 metres high, 65.5 metres long and 11 metres deep, and supported by two rows of six Doric columns. In 1793, the gate was crowned by the Quadriga statue, designed by Johann Gottfried Schadow. This statue also has its own story to tell. In 1806, when Napoleon’s army took Berlin, the French Emperor had the Quadriga transported to Paris as war booty and a sign of his victory. In 1814, after Napoleon’s forced abdication, the Quadriga was returned to Berlin where it once again adorned the Brandenburg Gate, facing towards the east and the city centre. https://www.visitberlin.de/en/brandenburg-gate
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East Side Gallery
At 1316 metres long, the open-air art gallery on the banks of the Spree in Friedrichshain is the longest continuous section of the Berlin Wall still in existence. Immediately after the wall came down, 118 artists from 21 countries began painting the East Side Gallery, and it officially opened as an open air gallery on 28 September 1990. Just over a year later, it was given protected memorial status. In more than a hundred paintings on what was the east side of the wall, the artists commented on the political changes in 1989/90. Some of the works at the East Side Gallery are particularly popular, such as Dmitri Vrubel’s Fraternal Kiss and Birgit Kinders’s Trabant breaking through the wall. They are not just a popular subject for postcards – you’re sure to want to photograph them yourself. https://www.visitberlin.de/en/east-side-gallery
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Reichstag
The Reichstag is an internationally recognisable symbol of democracy and the current home of the German parliament. Every year, thousands of guests visit the Reichstag - and with good reason: It is not often that you can enjoy such an amazing panorama while, just beneath your feet, the political decisions of tomorrow are being made. Both as an architectural wonder and a historical testimony, the Reichstag has an important role to play in Berlin. There are several options to visit the Reichstag: join a guided tour; listen to a plenary session (in German of course) or climb up to the dome and the roof! https://www.visitberlin.de/en/reichstag-in-berlin
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Berlin Television Tower
Soaring 368 metres into the sky, Berlin’s TV Tower is the city’s most visible landmark. But the tower on Alexanderplatz is not just literally a must-see sight, it is also the highest building in Europe open to the general public. And from the dizzying height of its viewing platform, you have spectacular 360-degree panoramic views out across the entire city – and beyond! East Germany, though, has long been history. But the TV Tower is still drawing the crowds – and is ranked among the top sights in twenty-first century Germany. After German reunification, the TV Tower took on an entirely new significance. No longer just a symbol of East Germany, the TV Tower quickly became an integral element of Berlin’s new cityscape, and soon came to symbolise the city – both nationally and internationally. Clear early morning skies – and not a cloud in sight? Then it’s time to hop out of bed and head for the TV Tower. For this popular tourist sight, the early riser really does skip the queues for the lift, especially on sunny days. https://www.visitberlin.de/en/berlin-television-tower
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Charlottenburg Palace
Discover the magic of the rococo at the beautiful Charlottenburg Palace – once a royal summer residence, today Berlin’s largest and most magnificent palace. In the Neuer Flügel (New Wing), you can view the staterooms and the rococo ballroom known as the Goldene Galerie (Golden Gallery). The Silver Vault includes quite stunning tableware of gold, silver, glass and porcelain displayed on laid tables. Around 100 table services have survived intact, a vivid reminder of the magnificence of dining at court. The impressive display of the remaining pieces of the Prussian crown jewels, complete with the imperial insignias, as well as personal treasures, such as the elaborated designed, exquisite snuffboxes collected by Friedrich the Great, are also well worth seeing. The Porcelain Cabinet in the Old Palace offers a breathtaking collection of the finest blue-and-white porcelain decorating the entire room. https://www.visitberlin.de/en/charlottenburg-palace-old-palace
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Band des Bundes
The government buildings in the heart of Berlin form a ribbon across the river Spree, symbolically connecting East and West. The parliamentary offices and the chancellery were not built until the wall came down and Berlin was chosen as the country’s seat of government. The buildings are exciting examples of contemporary architecture that no-one sightseeing in Berlin can afford to miss. The original idea for the Band des Bundes was a gesture of reunification. In a dual piece of symbolism, the government buildings and the offices for democratically elected MPs are both a physical connection and a symbolic bridge between East and West. The federal buildings are not just the centre of the town in geographical terms; since 2006, the striking concrete and glass buildings have been the first thing that visitors to Berlin see when they arrive at the city’s main station. https://www.visitberlin.de/en/band-des-bundes
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Berlin Cathedral
The magnificent dome of the Cathedral Church (Berliner Dom) is one of the main landmarks in Berlin’s cityscape – and marks the spot of the impressive basilica housing the city’s most important Protestant church. With its elaborate decorative and ornamental designs, the church interior is especially worth seeing. Yet although the church is known as a cathedral, it actually has the status of a parish church – though not just any parish. This was the court church to the Hohenzollern dynasty, the rulers of Prussia and later the German Emperors. Today, as the High Parish and Cathedral Church, the church serves the Protestant community in Berlin and the surrounding areas. The congregation is not based on place of residence, but open through admission to all baptised Protestants in the region. https://www.visitberlin.de/en/berlin-cathedral
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Kurfuerstendamm
No trip to Berlin is complete without a stroll down Kurfürstendamm. Berlin’s most popular shopping boulevard is the beating heart of the western city centre. Kurfürstendamm is Berlin’s most famous and popular shopping boulevard and is the heart of the western city centre. You’re sure to enjoy a successful shopping trip there. The 3.5-kilometre-long boulevard takes you from Breitscheidplatz and the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedächtniskirche to Rathenauplatz, where the Grunewald villas begin. Breitscheidplatz is where Kurfürstendamm officially begins; before that the street is called Tauentzienstraße. This runs into Wittenbergplatz, where you will find the legendary KaDeWe – Berlin’s most famous department store, which everyone associates with Kurfürstendamm, even though, technically, it isn’t on it. https://www.visitberlin.de/en/kurfurstendamm
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Pergamon Museum
The Pergamonmuseum is nothing short of a wonder in itself. Its rooms are overflowing with some of the world’s most impressive, long buried, treasures. The museum encompasses the vast history of the Ancient East, with collections that can not be experienced elsewhere. The museum is named after the Pergamon Altar, a Hellenistic masterpiece of white stone architecture. The imposing structure invites you to walk the steps of 2000 years of history and behold its intricacies close-up. But don’t get lost in this wonder for too long, as there are many more under the museum’s roof. Artefacts have been gathered from Iran, Asia Minor, Egypt and the Caucasus, and these worlds have been recreated for you to explore within the Pergamonmuseum. https://www.visitberlin.de/en/pergamon-museum
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Alexanderplatz
Alexanderplatz has always been one of the liveliest places in Berlin, with shops, cinemas, restaurants, and many attractions within walking distance. Alexanderplatz in Mitte is one of the best-known public squares in Berlin – and it’s certainly the biggest. Named after Tsar Alexander I, who visited the Prussian capital in 1805, most people simply call it Alex. Also in the winter you will find several Christmas markets at Alexanderplatz: at the Rotes Rathaus, at the Alexa shopping centre and around the world clock. https://www.visitberlin.de/en/alexanderplatz
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Christmas in Germany

14 December 2022

With the test plan in place, testers can begin to write and create detailed test cases. Team fleshes out the details of the structured tests they will run, including any test data they will need to facilitate those tests. While tests must ultimately validate the areas defined by requirements, testers can exert their skills and creativity in how they achieve this task. Testers work in the tech industry, although the type of software they test can vary from organization to organization. For example, a Tester at one company might test mobile apps, while another might test the user interface of a website, while still another might test a streaming service. Debugging was the main testing method at the time and remained so for the next two decades. Development teams looked beyond isolating and fixing software bugs to testing applications in real-world settings. It set the stage for a broader view of testing, which encompassed a quality assurance process that was part of the software development life cycle. Doing test activities earlier in the cycle helps keep the testing effort at the forefront rather than as an afterthought to development. Earlier software tests also mean that defects are less expensive to resolve.
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Nymphenburg Palace
The baroque palace in the west part of Munich was the summer residence of the Bavarian monarchs. Five generations of Wittelsbach rulers were involved in the construction of this stately ensemble, which houses several outstanding collections. With its lavishly decorated interior and the famous "Gallery of Beauties" commissioned by Ludwig I, the palace is one of Munich's favorite attractions. Among the highlights are the former bedroom of King Ludwig II and the impressive banquet hall with fine ceiling frescoes by Johann Baptist Zimmermann. The Nymphenburg Palace west of Munich is one of the largest royal palaces in Europe and is not to be missed on a sight-seeing tour through the Bavarian capital city. The oft-visited Baroque tourist attraction with it’s expansive landscaped garden and museum draws not only guests from around the world, but is also a beloved institution for Munich residents. In 1664, Prince Ferdinand Maria had the castle built as a present to his wife, who had borne him the long-awaited heir, Max Emanuel. Max Emanuel himself later played a significant role in expanding the palace layout. http://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/castles/nymphenburg-palace.html
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Marienplatz
Marienplatz is the central square in Old Town, Munich’s urban heart and the central point of the pedestrian zone. To the north is the magnificent neo-Gothic Neues Rathaus (“New Town Hall”), to the east the Altes Rathaus (“Old Town Hall”), and the passageway to Tal and the Viktualienmarkt (farmers’ market). To the south, the square is bordered by stores, office buildings, and restaurants. To the west, the pedestrian zone opens to Kaufingerstraße, which ends at the Karlstor (gate) located at the square known by locals as Stachus. Marienplatz has been the center of Munich since it was founded in 1158 and is the heart of the city. In the first few centuries, the approximately 100 x 50 meter large area was used as the central marketplace, which is attested to today by the fish fountain on the northeast corner of Marienplatz. In 1638 Elector Maximilian I had the Mariensäule (Mary’s Column) erected in gratitude for the city being spared during the Thirty Years’ War; Marienplatz takes its name from the Mariensäule. The column is used as a reference point in land surveying as the topological center of Bavaria. Today Marienplatz is a center for festivities and political, cultural, or sports events. During Advent, Munich’s oldest traditional Christmas market (“Christkindlmarkt”) takes place here. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/attractions/marienplatz.html
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St.Peter
"The Kirche St. Peter (“Church of St. Peter”) is one of Munich’s landmarks, the oldest parish church in the city, and is known affectionately by the locals as Alter Peter (“Old Peter”). The church stands on a hill called Petersbergl, which is the only noteworthy elevation within the Munich’s historic Old Town. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/churches/church-of-st-peter.html
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English Garden
"The Englische Garten (“English Garden”) is one of the largest urban parks in the world. The layout has undergone constant change throughout the centuries as new buildings and green spaces were added time and again. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/parks/english-garden.html
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Linderhof Palace
Situated in the midst of the Bavarian Alpine foothills, Schloss Linderhof (Linderhof Palace) attracts visitors to the imperial villa with its spacious landscaped garden and impressive terraces. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/castles/linderhof-palace.html
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Munich Residence
The Munich Residence served as the seat of government and residence of the Bavarian dukes, electors and kings from 1508 to 1918. What began in 1385 as a castle in the north-eastern corner of the city (the Neuveste, or new citadel), was transformed by the rulers over the centuries into a magnificent palace, its buildings and gardens extending further and further into the town. The rooms and art collections spanning a period that begins with the Renaissance, and extends via the early Baroque and Rococo epochs to Neoclassicism, bear witness to the discriminating taste and the political ambition of the Wittelsbach dynasty. Much of the Residence was destroyed during the Second World War, and from 1945 it was gradually reconstructed. Today, with the museums of the Bavarian Palace Administration (the Residence Museum itself, the Treasury and the Cuvilliés Theatre) along with other cultural institutions, this is one of the largest museum complexes in Bavaria. http://www.residenz-muenchen.de/englisch/residenc/
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Neues Rathaus (New Town Hall)
The Neue Rathaus (New Town Hall) is a magnificent neo-gothic building from the turn of the century which architecturally dominates the north side of Munich’s Marienplatz. The almost 100-meter-long (300 feet) main facade on Marienplatz is richly ornamented in neo-gothic style and shows almost the entire line of the house of Wittelsbach in Bavaria. The Glockenspiel in the tower balcony of the Neues Rathaus is also world famous and worth seeing. Since 1908, figurines representing stories from Munich’s history twirl on two levels daily at 11:00 a.m., 12:00 p.m., and 5:00 p.m. (the 5:00 p.m. show is omitted from November through February). In addition to the well-known coopers dancers, the Münchner Kindl (symbol of the city’s coat of arms), and the angel of peace also make an appearance in the almost 12-minute-long spectacle. At the top of the 85-meter-high (255 feet) tower on the city hall is an observation deck that can be accessed with an elevator and offers a grandiose view of the roofs of the city, even as far as the Alps in nice weather. In the generous and richly painted cellar vault of the Neues Rathaus is the Ratskeller, a traditional Munich restaurant since 1867. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/attractions/new-town-hall-neues-rathaus.html
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Olympic Park
At Olympiaberg in Munich, every skier can find just the right slope. The highest hill in the city offers a variety of options for descending: gently descending slopes for everyone who wants to learn to ski and bobsled, and steep descents for those who like to fly across the snow. The Olympic Park in northern Munich is well known beyond the borders of the capital city. The unique tent architecture of the buildings and the Olympic Tower are some of Munich’s well known landmarks. After the Olympic Games in 1972, a 300-hectare-sized park was developed into a recreation center for the entire city. Joggers, cyclists, and walkers take their laps here, and swimmers do lengths in the Olympic swimming facility. At over 50 meters (150 feet) high, the Olympic Hill towers over the park grounds and is an ideal spot to enjoy a view of the roofs of Munich and to the mountains beyond. http://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/parks/olympic-park.html
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Asam Church
The late Baroque Asam Church is located on Sendlingerstraße just a few minutes’ walk away from the Sendlinger Tor (Sendling Gate). It was erected between 1733 and 1746 by the Asam brothers and bears the official name of St. Johann Nepomuk. Originally planned as a private church for the builder, its Baroque facade is integrated into the row of houses on Sendlingerstraße. Two massive rocks arise from the base of the columns at the entrance. The luxuriously furnished interior breaks from Baroque convention with its proportional distribution. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/churches/asam-church.html
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Beer & Oktoberfest Museum
Munich is the capital of beer - with six breweries, the Hofbräuhaus and the Oktoberfest. Interested in the story of beer? So go into the Bier- und Oktoberfestmuseum. Learn more about the history of beer from migration of peoples, the monasteries, the purity law, and the unique quality of Munich's beer. And what about the story of the Oktoberfest? Established as the national festival for King Luis's wedding with Princess Theresa from Sachsen Hildburghausen to the world's great fair. Moreover, you can visit one of Munich's historical buildings. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/museums/beer-and-oktoberfest-museum.html
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Jewish Museum
Together with the Synagogue and the Jewish Community Center the Jewish Museum Munich forms part of the Jewish Center at St.-Jakobs-Platz. It is situated in immediate proximity to Marienplatz and Viktualienmarkt. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/museums/jewish-museum.html
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Lustheim Palace
Exemplary pleasure palace with novel (for the time) ceiling frescoes. Maximilian Emanuel's "hunting palace" was built to celebrate his marriage to the Emperor's daughter, Maria Antonia, in June 1685. The palace houses an outstanding collection of Meissen porcelain from the Ernst Schneider Foundation. The collection includes over 2,000 valuable plates, table centerpieces and animal figures, and is surpassed only by the collection in the Dresdner Zwinger Palace. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/castles/lustheim-palace.html
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Neue Pinakothek
Outstanding works of European art and sculpture from the late 18th to the beginning of the 20th century are in the spotlight of the Neue Pinakothek. One focus is on the German art of the 19th century - this collection, which goes back to the private collection of King Ludwig I, is one of the most comprehensive of all. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/museums/neue-pinakothek.html
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Deutsches Museum Verkehrszentrum
The Deutsches Museum shows its impressive collection of track and road vehicles in a completely new light. Historical coaches or steam locomotives take you to the roots of mobility. Exhibits and demonstrations clarify the interaction between the pleasure and tribulations of mobility. Motion as the basic principle of life, from inline-skate to Transrapid, is another topic. The exhibition was opened in 2003 in the historic halls of the old Exhibition Center. http://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/museums/deutsches-museum-verkehrszentrum.html
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Luisenpark
The Luisenpark is divided in an upper and a lower part. The lower Luisenpark is the oldest part of the park, and entry is free. The upper Luisenpark charges an admission fee, but it also has a lot more to offer. Drift lazily in gondolettas on the Kutzerweiher lake, climb over the stones in the mountain stream and experience a real Chinese tea ceremony. In the conservatory, you can discover not only tropical plants but also hundreds of species of colourful butterflies as well as fish, monkeys, crocodiles and many other exotic animals. Outside you will find cows, sheep, guinea pigs, storks, flamingos and more. The daily feeding of the penguins is quite the spectacle. Don't miss it! The park has many different playgrounds. Climbing, swinging, sliding, digging, and trampoline jumping — kids will love it! Parents can lounge on the free-to-use deck chairs. There are various restaurants, cafés, and kiosks in the park, but you can also bring your own food and beverages. https://www.visit-mannheim.de/en/Media/attractions/luisenpark
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Planetarium Mannheim
In one of Germany's oldest planetariums you can immerse yourself in the fascinating world of stars, planets and galaxies. A lifelike starry sky enchants here in a form that can only be seen in very dark places or from outer space. The Mannheim Planetarium in its present form was opened on 2 December 1984, after the first construction of 1927 had been severely damaged in the Second World War and then demolished. Nearly 300 spectators find space under the 20-meter dome. The 3 million euro projection device "Universarium IX", which was manufactured by Carl Zeiss AG, projects a lifelike starry sky that can only be seen in very secluded, dark places or from outer space. In addition, the planetarium has a modern laser system and powerful video projectors. In addition to classical astronomy programs, the planetarium also offers music shows, lectures in various languages ​​and special performances for children. https://www.visit-mannheim.de/Media/attraktionen/planetarium-mannheim
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Telecommunications Tower
The best view of Mannheim can be enjoyed from the more than 200-metre-high telecommunications tower. Centrally located between the banks of the Neckar and the Luisenpark, it offers breathtaking views across the Rhine plain to the Odenwald forest. Enjoy the view over a meal in the revolving Skyline restaurant, which is suspended directly under the viewing platform. Alongside Berlin, Munich and Dusseldorf, the telecommunications tower is one of the few of its kind in which you can enjoy a meal. Mannheim and the region are particularly beautiful at sunset. The best way to enjoy the view is over a romantic candlelit dinner in the revolving restaurant. https://www.visit-mannheim.de/en/Media/attractions/telecommunications-tower
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Jungbusch
Mannheim's lively Jungbusch district brings a real Berlin vibe to the city. Between its industrial romanticism and harbour scenery beats the creative heart of the city. With facilities like the Popakademie Baden-Wurttemberg, the Musikpark Mannheim or the creative business incubator C-HUB, it is a focal point for the city's many creative people. Jungbusch has evolved from its former life as a harbour to become a trendy district without losing its special charm. If you want to get to know the real Mannheim nightlife, head to Jungbusch. The cultural festival "Nachtwandel im Jungbusch" attracts visitors from right across the region. https://www.visit-mannheim.de/en/Media/attractions/jungbusch
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Multihalle Mannheim
Delicately curved and almost futuristic in appearance, the multi-purpose hall in Mannheim's Herzogenriedpark is the world's largest self-supporting wooden lattice-shell construction. It was designed in 1975 by the architect of the Munich Olympic Park, Frei Otto. At that time, the hall boasted the largest cantilevered dome in the world and quickly earned the nickname "Wonder of Mannheim". With its organic structure and material-minimised construction, it is famous in architectural circles way beyond German borders. Even for non-architects, however, the impressive hall is well worth a visit. https://www.visit-mannheim.de/en/Media/attractions/multihalle-im-herzogenriedpark
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Water Tower
Without doubt, the most popular landmark for all Mannheimers is the water tower "Wasserturm". No wonder it serves as the backdrop to so many wedding and holiday photos. Romantic and dreamy, it stands in one of the most beautiful Art Nouveau sites in Europe. Its fountains, promenades and arcades are a popular meeting place for locals and visitors alike. You get the best view of the water tower from one of the surrounding cafés on the Friedrichsplatz. Sitting under the arcades sipping a cup of coffee is guaranteed to give you a Mediterranean feeling. On summer evenings, you can marvel at the water fountain choreography. In the winter, the Christmas market around the Wasserturm is worth a visit too. https://www.visit-mannheim.de/en/Media/attractions/water-tower
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Baroque palace Mannheim
The imposing baroque palace with its impressive size is not without reason the largest Baroque palace in Germany. Stroll across the wide Ehrenhof, be impressed in the former State Rooms and the Castle Church or enjoy the student bustle of the University of Mannheim, which is located in the castle. https://www.visit-mannheim.de/Media/attraktionen/barockschloss-mannheim
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Christ Church
The Protestant Christuskirche alone impresses with its size - its round dome can be seen from afar and even towers over the nearby water tower. With its neo-baroque, magnificent exterior, it adapts to the surrounding villa district in the eastern part of the city - the Protestant church completed in 1911 is considered to be the most representative sacral building in Mannheim. https://www.visit-mannheim.de/Media/attraktionen/christuskirche2