active-pinPinned places
active-placeAdd a New Place
active-pinPinned places
active-placeAdd a New Place

Street Views in Rio De Janeiro

unpinned
Santa Teresa
Santa Teresa, the neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro that retain its colonial charm. Santa Teresa is located on top of the Santa Teresa hill and presents a magnificent view of the city. It is one of the few neighborhoods to resist development in order to retain its colonial charm. It is famous for its winding, narrow streets and for being an artistic hotspot. The construction of the Santa Teresa in the 18th century convent marked the beginning of the development of this neighborhood. Its natural scenery, the pleasant atmosphere and easy access to downtown Rio make this an attractive neighborhood. It is currently a popular tourist site as the area has its fair share of restaurants with live music, cultural centers and other attractions. Its bars and nightclubs are popular with both natives and tourists.
unpinned
Lapa
Lapa is a neighborhood famous for its Bohemian culture. It is well known for its architecture, the most famous monument being the Arcos da Lapa. The Passeio Publico is the first public park built in the city, which is another popular attraction of the neighborhood. Lapa is known for its lively social scene and cultural events. The neighborhood has many restaurants and bars. Many of these restaurants and clubs promote various forms of Brazilian music. The Sala Cecília Meirelles, an important venue for chamber music is also located in Lapa. The movement “I Am da Lapa” helped in the restoration of the neighborhood. With government support and active participation from the citizens, especially shop owners, great achievements in the development of the area have been made.
Explore more places related to this search:
unpinned
Embu das Artes Fair
The Arts and Crafts Fair is one of the main tourist attractions of Embu das Artes, located 27 km from São Paulo. A small town with less than 300 thousand inhabitants that breathes culture, Embu das Artes has its name because it has received great artists, especially Brazilian modernists, such as Anita Malfatti, Oswald de Andrade and Tarsila do Amaral. Occurring since 1969, the Fair occupies the streets of the town’s historical center with artists who exhibit and sell various products, like porcelain, sculptures, paintings, baskets, lace, trinkets, musical instruments and decoration items. The Green Fair also takes place over there, offering plants and ornamental flowers. If you want to learn more about Brazilian history and art, you’ll be amazed by the museums, churches and memorials in town, such as the Jesuit Sacred Art Museum and the Saint Lazarus Chapel. Embu also has many bars and cozy cafes with live music for you to relax and enjoy after seeing the Fair.
unpinned
Caraiva
The village of Caraíva in Bahia is formed by fishermen and has a very rustic style. This is one of those places that seem to have stood still in time. And, precisely, because of this old and pleasant way it is becoming a real sensation among tourists. When you close the distance between Trancoso and Caraíva, you will find dirt roads, rustic establishments and a small-town style. Even though Caraíva has acquired a slightly satisfactory structure, it still makes it clear that its essence is that of a fishing village and simple people. But, there is another reason and one of the main differentials of this very peculiar place! The truth is that automobiles cannot access this haven of modern life. The entire transfer of both the population and visitors needs to be carried out with boats and small boats. Doesn't it look like something from the last century? But, don't be fooled by this little difficulty! Whether to admire the sunset on the river, observe the meeting of the river's waters with the ocean and even to dance a lot at the balls animated by that tasty little forróro, you should consider the village and the Caraíva beach as your next destination.
unpinned
Taxco
It is a small but charming “Magical Town”, just 4 hours away from Acapulco, nestled in an area surrounded by great hills and mountains, thanks to the intense exploitation of its silver deposits. Its people still live from the commerce and manufacture of objects that the precious metal alloys; the baroque constructions raised during the mining boom of the Colony are still preserved. Any terrace is good to contemplate those jewels of the past, the new and small must be sought among the cobbled streets that go up and down everywhere. In addition, Taxco has a peculiar beauty, because this magnificent Magical Town has the ability to transport us to another time and space, just to the time of colonial Mexico. Its beautiful cobblestone streets are characterized by its inclination, and almost all of them lead to beautiful little squares where it is possible to walk, visit the kiosk or sit on one of their benches.
unpinned
Royal Street
For a full 13 blocks, Royal Street runs parallel to Bourbon Street, yet this thoroughfare – one of the finest stretches of art galleries, antique stores, wrought iron balconies, restaurants and architecture in the USA – is sometimes almost completely missed by visitors. This is a real shame; beyond the qualities we’ve just described, Royal Street makes a nice counterbalance to the neon and noise of Bourbon.
unpinned
Garden District
Love at first sight is a common experience for first time visitors to the Garden District. It often goes something like this: they’re traveling up St. Charles Avenue via the streetcar when they get their first glance of the oak tree lined streets and historic homes. You can tell by the pristine look on their faces, that the Garden District has started a new found romance. The romance blooms as the afternoon is spent exploring memories of New Orleans’ antebellum past, gazing at secluded mansions, wandering down the brick lined sidewalks. Its canopy of oak trees is world-famous, while its characteristic gardens of hibiscuses and crepe myrtles, angel trumpets and bougainvillea, make it one of New Orleans' most beautiful neighborhoods. The Garden District has worked its magic again.
unpinned
Jackson Square
Historic Jackson Square, originally known in the 18th century as "Place d'Armes," and later renamed in honor of the Battle of New Orleans hero Andrew Jackson, is a timeless attraction in the heart of the French Quarter of New Orleans. This famous landmark facing the Mississippi River is surrounded by historic buildings, including the St. Louis Cathedral, the Presbytere and Cabildo (Louisiana State Museums), not to mention the Lower and Upper Pontalba Apartments, the oldest apartment buildings in the United States. The Pontalba Apartments offer retail shops, museums, galleries and restaurants on the ground level; their second and third floors still house a selection of prestigious apartments. For well over a half-century, there has been an open-air artist colony at Jackson Square. Local artists paint, draw, create portraits, caricatures, and display their work on the square's iron fence. Some have been there for generations! Jackson Square is a favorite site for visitors and locals. The artists, restaurants, museums, merchants and the square itself make Jackson Square one of the French Quarter's most popular destinations.
unpinned
Bourbon Street
This street is a tourism destination for a reason. It’s a thoroughfare with an utterly fascinating history, home to some of the oldest bars, family-run restaurants and gay entertainment districts in the country. In short, while there’s plenty to discover off of Bourbon, there’s a lot to discover on the iconic street as well that may surprise those travelers who turn their nose up at all the flashing lights.
unpinned
Frenchmen Street
To this day, tour guides tell you that Frenchmen Street is an off the beaten gem, a ‘local’s Bourbon Street’ where the real New Orleanians gather to listen to live music and grab a drink. Excuse a bit of an eye roll on our part; That ‘locals-majority’ term may have rang true at the beginning of the twenty-teens, and to a degree, it’s an accurate description of Frenchmen throughout the 90s and much of the noughties. But the street really achieved a critical mass of popularity post-Katrina, and in the past few years, Frenchmen is tourist central come the evening, especially on weekends. On Frenchmen Street, certain things are just guaranteed: proximity to good music, good food, interesting culture, and an unbeatable street scene.
unpinned
Empire State Building
The world-famous Empire State Building located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, our 86th and 102nd floor observatories provide unforgettable 360° views of New York City and beyond. Whether you’re in town for a week or a day, no visit to NYC is complete without experiencing the top of the Empire State Building. The Empire State Building is more than a spectacular view. It’s an immersive experience inside a world famous landmark. In addition to our Observation Decks, your visit includes the newly restored lobby with its stunning art deco ceiling murals, the historical Dare To Dream Exhibit, and the Sustainability Exhibit.
unpinned
The Medina (Walled Town)
This is the original centre of the city. Abderramán III, Almería founded in 955 (10th century), by constructing a wall around the heart of the town, building a fortress to defend the city, and provide a mosque for prayer. It extended from the Avenue of the Sea to Queen Street. The route crossed diagonally from the main gateway (at the beginning of Queen Street ) to Sortida or Socorro (at Socorro Street), passing through Pechina or Real de la Almedina street, which were within the preserved route of Caliphate medina. This area can be best described as streets and alleys, where there were no free spaces for squares nor little squares. The squares are found around the Great Mosque, whereas the shopping district was formed for alhóndigas, souks and bazaars. Within here the Alcaicería (luxury shopping district) stood. The shipyard, located in the area of the current Atarazanas street, occupied an important space at the south-eastern tip of the medina. There were many neighbourhoods around this area, each with its small mosque, as in the case of existing in the current Hermitage of San Antón.
unpinned
German Village
And for family, friends, and visitors, it’s also a home away from home. That’s because you don’t have to live in German Village to live here. In German Village, its mission is simple: preserve, protect and promote life among the bricks. German Village Business Community is a collection of independent businesses, sharing resources and working together to promote the historic business community of German Village. Whether you’re planning a night out on our bricks or visiting for the weekend, you’ll find what you’re looking for when you click Shop. Dine. Stroll. above.
unpinned
Place Jacques-Cartier and Place De La Dauversiere
No stroll through Old Montréal would be complete without a stop at Place Jacques-Cartier, a lively spot steeped in heritage. A meeting place for centuries, Montrealers and visitors alike gather here to admire the view of the Old Port, sit for a spell at an outdoor terrasse, take in performances of the many street artists and enjoy entertainment at every time of year. In fact, one could say that Place Jacques-Cartier is at its most magical during the Christmas season. Today, Place Jacques-Cartier teems with artists, artisans, portrait painters and musicians, however it offers more than just entertainment: history buffs appreciate the Nelson Monument, a 35-metre column erected in 1809, as well as the black pavement denoting the outline of the Château de Vaudreuil, former 18th-century governor’s mansion in New France. Continue your stroll east along Notre-Dame Street and you will come to Place De La Dauversière, across from City Hall. Today, it is a magnificent public garden where passers-by like to while away the hours, immersed in its rich history that begins with the very founding of Montréal. Named in honour of Jérôme Le Royer de La Dauversière, founder of the Société de Notre-Dame, it was the site of the Lemoine-Despins family home in 1750, then of James McGill in 1805.
unpinned
Petit Champlain District
Rue du Petit-Champlain, one of the oldest commercial streets in North America, is lined with one-of-a-kind boutiques and restaurants. The Petit-Champlain district isn’t just illuminated for the holidays—it stays decorated all winter long, much to everyone’s delight. It’s the ideal place to bundle up for a winter evening stroll in an enchanting atmosphere straight out of a Christmas fairy tale. The French influence is evident everywhere you look in Place Royale and along Rue du Petit-Champlain. The two—and three—storey plastered stone homes with their dormer windows, gabled roofs, large chimneys and firewalls rising above the rooftops make it hard to believe you’re not in France.
unpinned
Old Quebec
A UNESCO World Heritage treasure, Old Québec is the only fortified city north of Mexico. Bask in the European charm as you stroll through the old quarters and take in over 400 years of history in the birthplace of French North America.
unpinned
Art District Montcalm
A perfect balance between bourgeois and bohemian, the Montcalm neighbourhood attracts epicureans, sports fans, and art and culture lovers in a magnificent historical environment. Head to the Upper Town for a highly entertaining and tasty experience! Stroll down avenue Cartier in the heart of the Art District and you’ll pass a hundred or so places of business. Enjoy the lively atmosphere, gourmet food shops, and fashionable and specialty boutiques of this less-touristy area. Bookstores, theatre, museums, movies, art galleries: in Montcalm there's something for culture lovers of every stripe. Don't forget to visit the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (MNBAQ), a real architectural gem showcasing both Québec and international art. To keep up with the latest films, head to Cinéma Cartier, the only movie theatre downtown; it can get pretty busy on weekends.
unpinned
Rue Saint Jean
A stroll along rue Saint-Jean is a must for anyone visiting Québec City. Starting from centrally located Place D’Youville, a string of boutiques, restaurants, churches, and historic buildings create a unique and eclectic ambiance. And when the street is closed to traffic in summer, pedestrians take over and a festive atmosphere reigns. Religion, politics, and education converge at Place de l’Hôtel-de-Ville, home to City Hall and just steps from Notre-Dame de Québec Cathedral-Basilica and the historic Séminaire de Québec. In summer, you can watch the performances of the public entertainers while the charming wooden kiosks of the German Christmas Market settle there from late November to end of December. The ice rink at Place D'Youville is the perfect place to experience Québec City's winter. From mid-November, put on skates and enjoy its magical atmosphere!
unpinned
Distillery Historic District
Toronto’s newest centre for arts, culture, food and entertainment. This national historic site includes 44 heritage buildings and numerous brick-lined courtyards. Explore the district’s many restaurants, art galleries, artisan boutiques, specialty retail stores and more.
unpinned
Dalt Vila
You're better off on foot, in sensible shoes, exploring the narrow, winding, steep cobbled streets and magnificent views from the breaks in the high ramparts and the vast terraces at each level. There are three official routes around Dalt Vila, though you can just wander around, get lost and surprise yourself at what you find. The tourist office in Vara de Rey gives out free guides to navigate the warren of streets and there are information plaques sprouting up from the ground all over; these give you, in multiple languages, a chance to learn and do your own guided tour at your leisure, amidst the residents hanging out their washing from their balconies. A fantastic way to discover the hidden treasures of the old town are the guided tours by Ibiza City Tour - the experienced guides will stimulate your imagination with many anecdotes and interesting facts.
unpinned
Gothic Quarter
The Gothic Quarter is one of the most famous landmarks in Barcelona. Located in the heart of the old city, this neighborhood features a fusion of buildings dating from Roman times to the 20th century. The main attribute of the Gothic Quarter is the antique aspect of its buildings, narrow streets and the near absence of traffic. In fact, many areas are for pedestrians only and built like a labyrinth of winding streets and hidden squares.
unpinned
The Promenade des Anglais
The tourist reputation of Promenade des Anglais has gone beyond the French or European borders. At present, the famed promenade is a landmark of Nice, from both an infrastructural and a tourist point of view. In fact, its importance for the commercial and tourist platform of the city is reflected by its structure and use. By following the promenade, visitors have the opportunity to stumble on some of the top attractions and architectural marvels of Nice. First of all, it’s the beaches. Most of the beaches in Nice (either private or otherwise) nestle between Baie des Anges and Promenade des Anglais being accessible from the promenade side. Secondly, sights like the Phoenix Park with its imposing Museum of Asian Arts, Palais de la Mediterranee and Hotel Negresco, all are accessible from the proud promenade. On top of that, the street is lined with bars and restaurants where tourists can relax and have a refreshment. Plenty of the bike stands managed by Velo Bleu are also located on Promenade des Anglais. The promenade obviously has something to offer to everyone: it is ideal for sightseeing tours, it provides access to the beach and it is practicable for roller-skaters and cyclists.
unpinned
Old Town of Nice
The Old Town of Nice is made up of tall tenement houses lined up along narrow and dark streets. The ground floors are occupied by restaurants, shops and galleries of local artists. You can buy everything here, from Provence spices to hand-made jewelry and cosmetics. Just go in and let yourself be carried away by the past, which is still present in this place. The Old Town of Nice (Vieille Ville), also called Old Nice (Vieux Nice), lies just below the Castle Hill. In the south, it borders with the Promenade des Anglais, and in the north with the Paillon River, or rather the Promenade of Paillon, because the river has been flowing through the city in the underground channel since 1972. The names of streets in the Old Town are written in two versions: in French and in the local Nissart dialect (niçart). The Old Town of Nice is full of historic tenements, churches and squares. A walk through the narrow and shaded streets allows you to almost move in time and feel the spirit of Old Nice. You just need to know where to look for it.
unpinned
Place Bellecour
It’s the largest pedestrian square in Europe. So whether you want to get to the Tourist Information centre inside, join a march, jump on the big wheel, or just simply sit, this oversized square reinvigorates the lungs and stretches the horizons. As the central focus of shopping on the presqu’île and the chosen starting point for most city visits, Bellecour is the kilometre 0 of Lyon and all distances are calculated from it. Four major streets start from this famous square: rue de la République, which takes you up to Hôtel de Ville and the Opera; rue Victor Hugo and rue du Plat both leading to Perrache; and rue du Président Édouard Herriot, with a concentration of luxury shops all the way to the Place des Terreaux. Surrounded by linden trees, wild cherries and beautiful Napoleonic buildings, Place Bellecour is the third largest square in France after Place des Quinconces in Bordeaux and Place de la Concorde in Paris, measuring 312m by 200m, not to mention the biggest pedestrian square in the whole of Europe. Fact.
unpinned
Geneva Old Town
The Vieille-Ville is the largest historic town in Switzerland, and is dominated by St. Peter's Cathedral, the symbolic location of the Reformation. Climb the 157 steps to the top of the tower for a unique panorama of the city. Then take a stroll in the charming surrounding alleys and passageways, each telling its own story about Geneva's history.
unpinned
Trastevere
Trastevere is one of the most pleasant neighbourhoods in the city. Its peaceful and bohemian atmosphere is capable of dazzling tourists without failing to attract assiduous Roman citizens. The life of the neighbourhood is especially concentrated around the Piazza di Santa Maria in Trastevere, where you can see the ancient Basilica of Our Lady in Trastevere. The great fountain in front of the temple serves as a meeting place, a resting spot, or simply somewhere to have an ice cream on a hot day. A walk through the narrow cobbled streets of the Trastevere shows hidden treasures such as modest medieval churches, small shops with the most unusual objects, or even some scenes of everyday life seemingly taken from a forgotten age.
unpinned
Herculaneum
Ercolano, known to many as Herculaneum, is just a few miles from Pompeii and 150 miles south of Rome, close to Naples. In many respects Ercolano is a smaller version of Pompeii, both are buried Roman cities that have been remarkably preserved when excavated. A lot of people prefer Ercolano to Pompeii as it is a much more compact size and has significantly less visitors. Both sites are managed by the same people and it is easy to visit both in one day using a combined ticket and the local train which connects both. Both sites are managed by the same people and it is easy to visit both in one day using a combined ticket and the local train which connects both.
unpinned
Brera
Brera is synonymous with the artistic heart of the city. In fact, as you stroll along the streets of this ancient district, you cannot help but be enchanted by its almost surreal atmosphere boasting small artisan’s workshops or quaint stores selling canvases and paints. Additionally, Brera is home to the impressive Accademia di Belle Arti, where visitors can admire Milan’s famous painting collection at the Pinacoteca (the Brera Picture Gallery), the historic Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense (Braidense National Library) , the Museo Astronomico (The Astronomical Museum), the oldest scientific research institute in the city and the Giardino Botanico (Botanical Gardens), an evocative green space located.
unpinned
Old Town Centre
The Old Town Centre of Crotone is easily identified because it is situated on a hill, close to the sea, enclosed until the end of 800, from the sixteenth century city wall with a very ancient history. According to archaeologists, the acropolis of the ancient Kroton stood here. It is said to house, among other buildings, the Temple of the Muses, home of the Pythagorean school, known throughout the Mediterranean. It is a very layered urban fabric, which for the continuous destruction, reconstruction, alterations, increases in volume that are superimposed over the course of three centuries, which have no name of the type Byzantine, Medieval,Renaissance, Baroque. The city was subjected to several foreign domination over the centuries whose influence is reflected in the heterogeneous style of its old town center. The types are mostly composite, with many terraced houses, narrow winding streets, wherein the worship buildings and noble palaces are concentrated in little squares. Political power and religious power are added together in these contexts of social life, where shops of merchants and artisans overlook the, but on which lies primarily the importance of the church, the convent of the palace. While Castle Square preserves the centuries the peculiarity of Square of arms, Dome Square, the political center of the city is the seat of Royal House, the Bishop's Palace, and of course the Cathedral church. At Suriano Square Suriano (now Umberto I Square), destined for popular assemblies, dominate the convent of St. Francis of Assisi, now the Seminary, with the annexed church and mansions of Suriano (now Albani Palace),and the Marquis Berlingeri.
unpinned
Grand Place of Tournai
The Grand Place of Tournai, a place of relaxation in a prestigious setting. Taste the conviviality of a Grand-Place animated by the terraces of numerous cafes and restaurants. From the rue Saint-Martin, the rue des Maux or the Place de l'Eveche, join one of the most beautiful and authentic Grand Place in the country! Triangular in shape, it is the perfect place to enjoy one of our typical dishes or one of our local beers. On sunny days, it's a whole neighborhood that comes alive, rocked by the sound of water jets and child players. The terraces fill up, the little sweet pleasures are tasted, the chime sounds for the delight of music lovers. Place of exchange, market and events, the Grand Place radiates throughout the City of 5 Clochers!
unpinned
Belfry of Tournai
The Belfry of Tournai, listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, is the oldest in Belgium. True watchtower since the 12th century, it overlooks the Grand Place of Tournai of its 72 meters high. After having climbed the 257 steps, the top of the Belfry offers you the most beautiful panorama of the city and its surroundings! The Belfry has long played an important role in the city of Tournai: watchtower, prison, steeple, city hall ... It previously symbolized the communal freedoms and its bell, called "Bancloque", warned the population of the trials, executions, invasions or fires. After being renovated for 10 years (1992-2002), the Belfry allows you to discover its history through didactic panels, the dungeon, the carillonneur's room and the carillon that resonates in the city every Sunday in summer.
unpinned
Old Town (Altstadt)
Zurich's Old Town is the historic part of town – and by historic, we mean medieval. Winding cobblestone alleys run alongside quintessential Zurich attractions like the Great Minster. You'll also find several acclaimed museums – such as the Swiss National Museum and the Museum of Art – and hotels in and around the district. Though all of the neighborhood's buildings are worth admiring, when visiting Old Town, be sure to check out Muhlesteg Footbridge. This bridge, which is famous for its array of love locks, comes highly recommended by past travelers. But those traveling with kids should consider visiting during the day. Old Town boasts the highest concentration of nightclubs in Switzerland, which come alive once the sun goes down.
unpinned
Bruges by Boat
A visit to Bruges isn’t complete without a boat trip on its canals. Go aboard at any of the five landing stages for a half-hour trip that allows you to appreciate the most noteworthy delights of the city from a completely different angle. March to mid-November: daily 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m. (last departure at 5.30 p.m.).
unpinned
Bruges By Horse-drawn Carriage
The half-hour carriage ride along Bruges’ historic winding streets trots off on Markt (at Burg on Wednesday morning). Halfway through the ride the carriage briefly stops at the Beguinage. The coachman gives expert commentary en route.
unpinned
Murano Island
It's probably the most famous island of the venetian Lagoon, it's composed by seven minor islands. It is well known worldwide for the art of blowing glass. All glass factories were moved to the island of Murano in 1295 to preserve the city from fires that often were caused by factories themselves. Murano was at first inhabited by refugees coming from Altino right after the barbarian invasion. Today it is completely urbanized and counts on 5500 inhabitant. Until 1171, when it was annexed to the Santa Croce district, the island was autonomous. In the year 1275 part of the autonomy was returned to the island's government, so they could promulgate laws and even coin their own money (the Osella). The autonomy of Murano was maintained also during the Austrian domination, that made of it a municipality. During the Austrian occupancy many churches and monasteries were sacked and destroyed so that only three now are left. The Murano municipality (that includes San’t Erasmo and Vignole islands) was suppressed in 1923 and the territory unified with the Municipality of Venice.