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Monuments

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India Gate
At the centre of New Delhi stands the 42 m high India Gate, an "Arc-de-Triomphe" like archway in the middle of a crossroad. Almost similar to its French counterpart, it commemorates the 70,000 Indian soldiers who lost their lives fighting for the British Army during the World War I. The memorial bears the names of more than 13,516 British and Indian soldiers killed in the Northwestern Frontier in the Afghan war of 1919. The foundation stone of India Gate was laid by His Royal Highness, the Duke of Connaught in 1921 and it was designed by Edwin Lutyens. The monument was dedicated to the nation 10 years later by the then Viceroy, Lord Irwin. Another memorial, Amar Jawan Jyoti was added much later, after India got its independence. The eternal flame burns day and night under the arch to remind the nation of soldiers who laid down their lives in the Indo-Pakistan War of December 1971. During nightfall, India Gate is dramatically floodlit while the fountains nearby make a lovely display with coloured lights. India Gate stands at one end of Rajpath, and the area surrounding it is generally referred to as 'India Gate'. Surrounding the imposing structure is a large expanse of lush green lawns, which is a popular picnic spot. One can see hoards of people moving about the brightly lit area and on the lawns on summer evenings.
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National Monument
The main Sudirman-Thamrin avenues in Jakarta lead to the Merdeka Square, where in its center stands the National Monument (also known as Monas or Monumen Nasional) which houses the first red-and-white flag flown at the Proclamation of Independence on 17 August 1945. This flag has now become threadbare, and so nowadays on Independence Day ceremonies, the original flag is taken out but only to accompany the replica flag to be flown in front of the Merdeka Palace. The 137 meter tall National Monument is obelisk shaped, and is topped with a 14.5 meter bronze flame coated with 32 kilograms gold leaf. Within the pedestal is a museum depicting in diorama Indonesia’s fight for Independence as well as the original text of the Proclamation of Independence. A lift takes visitors up to the look-out platform at the base of the flame for a grand view of Jakarta. Surrounding the Monument is now a park with a musical fountain, enjoyed by the Jakarta public on Sundays for sports and recreation. Deer roam among the shady trees in the park.
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Former Kowloon-Canton Railway Clock Tower
Standing 44-metres tall, the old Clock Tower was erected in 1915 as part of the Kowloon–Canton Railway terminus. The once-bustling station is long gone, but this red brick and granite tower, now preserved as a Declared Monument, survives as an elegant reminder of the Age of Steam. It has also been a memorable landmark for the millions of Chinese immigrants who passed through the terminus to begin new lives not just in Hong Kong, but in other parts of the world via the city’s harbour.
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Christ the Redeemer Statue
In the top of the mountain is installed Christ the redeemer, one of the most wanted touristic sides of Rio de Janeiro. Biggest and most famous scripture Art Déco of the world, the Christ statue started to be planned in 1921 and it was developed by the engineer Heitor da Silva Costa over 5 years of job, from 1926 to 1931, the opening year of the monument. It’s located at Parque Nacional da Tijuca, 710 meter above the sea level, where anybody can appreciate one of the most beautiful views of the city. Over all 220 steps that lead to the famous statue feet, it was elected one of the Seven Wonders of the World made by formal voting in 2007 by the Swiss Institution New 7 Wonders Foundation. The monument is accessible by train, van or car.
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Hollywood Sign
Looking for a picture-perfect view of the Sign? For many visitors to Los Angeles, there is no more coveted photo than a shot of the world famous Sign. Though it is visible from all over the city from its lofty perch on Mt. Lee, it can actually be surprisingly difficult to get a well-angled shot. Stunning views of the Hollywood Sign unfold at your own pace on hiking trails that meander through the rolling chaparral of the Santa Monica Mountains. Trails originally blazed by paws, hooves, and yucca-thatched moccasins now connect us to cultural as well as natural wonders. The western frontier of Griffith Park offers hikers amazingly close encounters with the Sign, which is off-limits to human hands, just below the ridgeline at the 1,708-foot summit of Mt. Lee. On the longest hike, you can ascend above and behind the Sign’s 45-foot-tall aluminum letters, where you look out over a windswept vista encompassing the DOOWYLLOH sign, the dreamy towers of downtown Los Angeles, and, on a clear day, the ageless blue Pacific.
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Wenceslas Square
The city square in the centre of Prague is a traditional venue for celebrations, demonstrations, and public gatherings. It was witness to many historic moments. It is also the second-largest square in the entire Czech Republic, and is a gathering place for Prague residents. When you say, "Let's meet at the horse," everyone knows that the meetup place is the equestrian statue of the patron saint of the Czech lands: the statue of St Wenceslas, which reigns over the entire square.
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The Little Mermaid
At Langelinje Pier you will find one of Copenhagen's most famous tourist attractions: The sculpture of The Little Mermaid. 23 August 2013 she turned 100 years old. Unveiled on 23 August 1913, The Little Mermaid was a gift from Danish brewer Carl Jacobsen to the City of Copenhagen. The sculpture is made of bronze and granite and was inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale about a mermaid who gives up everything to be united with a young, handsome prince on land. Every morning and evening she swims to the surface from the bottom of the sea and, perched on her rock in the water, she stares longingly towards the shore hoping to catch a glimpse of her beloved prince. Carl Jacobsen fell in love with the character after watching a ballet performance based on the fairy tale at the Royal Danish Theatre in Copenhagen. The brewer was so captivated by both the fairy tale and the ballet that he commissioned the sculptor Edvard Eriksen to create a sculpture of the mermaid.
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Atomium
Unavoidable icon of Brussels en Belgium, important place for international tourism, unique creation in the history of architecture and emblematic vestige of the World fair in Brussels, the Atomium is today the most popular tourist attraction of Europe’s Capital. The Atomium was constructed for the first post-war universal world exhibition (EXPO 58) The nine spheres represent an iron crystal magnified 165 billion times. They represent the faith one had in the power of science and moreover in nuclear power.
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Cinquantenaire Park
The Cinquantenaire park is comprised of a vast set of gardens dotted with monuments and museums. It is dominated by a triumphal arch with three arches. The park hosts numerous activities throughout the year: events, celebrations, firework displays, sporting events, concerts, etc. This place of interest was built in 1880 for the 50th anniversary of the independence of Belgium. The broad pathways lead to the Pavilion of Human Passions designed by Victor Horta, the Royal Museum of the Armed Forces & Military History, the Royal Museums of Art and History and to Autoworld. At the top of the three triumphal arches there’s a bronze quadriga and an unbeatable sweeping view over the whole of Brussels.
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National Heroes Park
The area on which the National Heroes Park now stands was once one of the most popular spots in Kingston. For 101 years, the land was the centre for horse racing in Jamaica. It was also the site for other sporting activities such as cricket and cycle racing. Being a place where people naturally gathered, the area was also the venue for travelling circuses that visited the island from time to time. The site was officially renamed the National Heroes Park in 1973 and is now a permanent place for honouring our heroes whose monuments are erected in an area known as the Shrine. Another section, reserved for prime ministers and outstanding patriots, adjoins the Shrine area, to the north.
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Bajra Sandhi Monument
Set within a beautiful park in front of the Bali Governor Office in Renon, Denpasar, this massive cultural monument was built in order to mark the struggle of the Balinese people throughout history. The Bajra Sandhi Monument features a three-tiered black stone structure with a tall tower that’s surrounded by courtyards. There’s a spiral staircase that leads up to the top of the monument offering 360-degree views of Denpasar, including the surrounding government buildings and the towers of the Denpasar Cathedral. On the building’s second floor, a series of 33 dioramas trace Bali’s long and unique history: prehistoric times, the introduction of Hinduism, Dutch colonialism, and its independence.
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Russalka Memorial
The Russalka Memorial was built in 1902 by Amandus Adamson in memorial to those who lost their lives at the Gulf of Finland on the Russian navy vessel called Russalka. The 16-metre sculpture was placed by the sea where the promenade from Kadriorg Palace comes down to meet the Bay of Tallinn. The monument depicts a bronze angel on a granite pillar pointing an Orthodox cross in the assumed direction of the sunken ship.
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Freedom Square
The representative square of Tallinn – Freedom Square is a popular meeting place designed for pedestrians. The monument to the War of Independence is also located there. Over the years, the square has gone by many names: Heinaturg (Hay Market), Peetri plats (Peter’s Square), and Võiduväljak (Victory Square) among them. It was first named Freedom Square in 1939, remaining that way until 1948. The name was readopted in 1989. The defensive structures found at archaeological excavations have been preserved and stored in the parking lot under the square; the remains of the guard gates of the defence tower can be seen at the end of Harju Street through a glass screen.
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Tammsaare Park
Tammsaare Park is located in the centre of Tallinn, between the Estonia Theatre and Viru Keskus shopping centre. In 1896, one corner of the park became the new site of Tallinn’s market, which was formerly located on Town Hall Square. From 1903–1905, the park was home to a giant wooden ‘Interimstheater’ – a barn-type hall that was a venue for theatre performances and cinema screenings. When this building burnt down, space was landscaped and pathways were constructed. In 1978, a statue of A. H. Tammsaare was erected in the centre of the park to mark the Estonian author’s 100th birthday. Tammsaare Park has modern lighting, white park furniture, and thousands of flower bulbs.
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Lincoln Memorial
"In this temple, as in the hearts of the people for whom he saved the Union, the memory of Abraham Lincoln is enshrined forever."Beneath these words, the 16th President of the United States—the Great Emancipator and preserver of the nation during the Civil War—sits immortalized in marble. Since its dedication on Memorial Day, 1922, the Lincoln Memorial has become the site of some of the nation’s most important social demonstrations, perhaps most notably Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.Lincoln is surrounded by 36 Doric columns, one for each state at the time of his death. By the time construction was finished, 12 more states had joined the Union, so the names of all 48 states are carved around the top of the 99 foot tall structure. A plaque for Alaska and Hawaii was added later. The Southern and Northern interior walls of the memorial are inscribed with the full text of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and 2nd Inaugural Address, respectively. Construction was completed in May, 1922 and the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated on Memorial Day, May 30, 1922.
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Washington Monument
Built to honor George Washington, the United States' first president, the 555-foot marble obelisk towers over Washington, D.C.George Washington's military and political leadership were indispensable to the founding of the United States. As commander of the Continental Army, he rallied Americans from thirteen divergent states and outlasted Britain's superior military force. As the first president, Washington's superb leadership set the standard for each president that has succeeded him. The Washington Monument towers above the city that bears his name, serving as an awe-inspiring reminder of George Washington's greatness. The monument, like the man, stands in no one's shadow.The Washington Monument, designed by Robert Mills and eventually completed by Thomas Casey and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, honors and memorializes George Washington at the center of the nation's capital. The structure was completed in two phases of construction, one private (1848-1854) and one public (1876-1884). Built in the shape of an Egyptian obelisk, evoking the timelessness of ancient civilizations, the Washington Monument embodies the awe, respect, and gratitude the nation felt for its most essential Founding Father. When completed, the Washington Monument was the tallest building in the world at 555 feet, 5-1/8 inches.
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Anitkabir
Before building of Anitkabir, Anittepe’s (Monument Hill ) name was Rasattepe (Observation Hill) because there was an observatory on this hill. There were also tumultuous (graves) belonging to Phrygian civilization of 3rd Century BC on this hill. Archaeological excavations took place to remove these tombs after the decision was given to build Anitkabir on Rasattepe. Remains found on these excavations are on display in the museum of Anatolian Civilizations. The first stage to start the construction was the expropriation of the land after deciding on the Anitkabir project. Actual construction of Anitkabir commenced on 9 October 1944 with a splendid ceremony by laying the first stone of the foundation. Construction of Anitkabir took nine years in four stages. Second stage construction, comprising the mausoleum and the auxiliary buildings surrounding the ceremonial ground, started on 29 September 1945 and completed on 8 August 1950. The third stage was comprising the construction of the roads leading to the mausoleum, Lions’ alley, ceremonial ground, the mausoleum’s upper-level stone pavement, grand stairs, putting the big tomb stone in its place and installation of electricity, plumbing and heating systems.
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Duatepe Monument
The Duatepe Monument was built by afforestation of Gazi Tepe, Türbe Tepe and Mangal Mountain on the last line of defence where Sakarya Square War, which is considered the turning point of the War of Independence, was held. Work started in Duatepe in October 1999 and 20 thousand trees were planted and the monument was completed and opened on 12 September 2000. Polatlı, Duatepe Monument consists of five parts: parking lot, connection road, walkway, ceremony area and monument. There is information written in brass letters of 81 martyrs in Duaepe on the walls of the monument. The creator of the monument and sculptures is the State Artist sculptor Metin Yurdanur. The monument symbolically tells the story of the Anatolian people running to victory and civilization like an enthusiastic river under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. The figure of Mustafa Kemal on his prancing horse expresses the pride and happiness he has become the leader of the Turkish Nation. The sculptures of Atatürk, İnönü and Marshal Fevzi Çakmak, which are in the background, describe the command unit and the statue of Halide Edip Adıvar describes the contribution of the Turkish woman to the War of Independence. The scene where Atatürk and his child watch the plain through binoculars expresses the Turkish nation, which is waiting for the victory to be won a little later and the next independence.
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The Arch Of Triumph
The Arch of Triumph in Bucharest was a modest monument, in the beginning, made of wood and built in 1878 after the Independence War to mark the victory parade on October 8 the same year. Two inscriptions were written in front of it: The defenders of Independence and Bucharest City. A statue representing The Victory was placed on the Arch. There were also written the names of the places were Romanians fought for freedom to remain on this symbol of triumph in the War of Independence against the Turkish Empire and of its domination which lasted for more than 300 years. Made of pink marble from Ruschita and stone brought from 5 important Romanian quarries, the Arch of Triumph is 27 meters high and 25 meters wide and is considered a modern new Romanian architectural masterpiece. It is also one of the symbols and highlights of Bucharest. Now, the Arch of Triumph is part of the tour the authorities thought might help foreign tourists and not only to discover the Romanian capital.
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Native American Totem Poles
The First Nations Totem Poles in Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia are the most visited attraction in Vancouver, British Columbia, and possibly all of Canada! There are a number of beautiful totem poles in Stanley Park at 2 different locations within the park.
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Heroes Square
Laid out in 1896 to mark the thousandth anniversary of Hungary, Heroes' Square (Hősök tere) is the largest and most impressive square of the city. Located at the end of Andrássy Avenue and next to City Park, Heroes’ Square is one of the most visited sights in Budapest. Surrounded by two important buildings, Museum of Fine Arts on the left and Kunsthalle (Hall of Art) on the right, Heroes’ Square is also a station of the Millennium Underground. The Millennium Monument in the middle of the square was erected to commemorate the 1000-year-old history of the Magyars. Archangel Gabriel stands on top of the center pillar, holding the holy crown and the double cross of Christianity. The seven chieftains who led the Magyar tribes to Hungary can be seen on the stand below. Statues of kings and other important historical figures stand on top of the colonnades on either side of the center pillar.
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Panfilovets' Park
Panfilovets’ Park is located in central-east Almaty in the area surrounding Zenkov Cathedral. The park is dedicated and named after the Panfilov Heroes. The memorial in the park is in memory of the 28 soldiers of an Almaty infantry unit who died fighting the Nazis outside Moscow. Ivan Panfilov was the name of the General commanding the 316 division who, in spite of suffering heavy casualties, managed to significantly delay the enemy’s advance on the capital, buying time for the defenders of the city. An eternal flame commemorating the fallen of 1917-20 (the Civil War) and 1941-45 (WWII), burns in front of the giant black monument of soldiers from all 15 Soviet republics. The Park itself is a very popular local green area within the city of Almaty. A good place to sit, rest and contemplate the sights of the city.
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Republic Square (New Square)
A beautiful and open place to enjoy the culture of Almaty: The Republic Square in Almaty is the home to the Akimat House, the Monument of Independence, The Presidential Residence, The Foundation of the First President of the Republic of Kazakhstan. The Central State Museum of the Republic of Kazakhstan is right nearby.
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Ben Youssef Madrasa
Right in the heart of the medina, the Ben Youssef Medersa, one of the biggest medersas in the Maghreb, is one of the most remarkable historical monuments in Marrakesh and is worth a visit. it was built in the 16th century by the saadian abd allah al ghalib, which is confirmed by the inscriptions on the lintel of the entrance gate and on the capitals of the prayer room. Created on a 1,680-sq.m quadrilateral plan, the medersa used to accommodate 130 students rooms over two floors around an interior patio leading to the prayer room.
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Banteay Srei
The tenth century temple of Banteay Srei is renowned for its intricate decoration carved in pinkish sandstone that covers the walls like tapestry. Banteay Srei is an exquisite miniature; a fairy palace in the heart of an immense and mysterious forest; the very thing that Grimm delighted to imagine, and that every child's heart has yearned after, but which mature years has sadly proved too lovely to be true. And here it is, in the Cambodian forest at Banteay Srei, carved not out of the stuff that dreams are made of, but of solid sandstone.
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George Square
The heart of the city, nestled between Glasgow City Chambers and Queen Street train station, is a sprawling square sporting a baker's dozen worth of statues. Ironically, the only statue missing is the titular George himself, King George III. Although one was originally planned, the planning and building of the Square itself coincided with the War of American Independence in the late 1700s. This caused many problems for the so called “Tobacco Lords,” Glaswegian merchants who made their fortunes in trade with the American colonies. This animosity was compounded by loss of the war in 1783, coupled with the fact that the monarch was gripped by insanity leading to his nickname, “The Mad King.” As a result, the powers in Glasgow decided instead to erect the first ever memorial commemorating Sir Walter Scott, the famous Scottish novelist. He is in good company, joined by fellow poets Robert Burns and Thomas Campbell, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, Prime Ministers Robert Peel and William Ewart Gladstone along with MP James Oswald, army commanders Lord Clyde and Sir John Moore, with engineer James Watt and chemist Thomas Graham.
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Capital Gate
Drive down Khaleej Al Arabi Street and you will see a modern-day challenger to the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Capital Gate, developed by Abu Dhabi National Exhibitions Company, has been certified as the ‘World’s Furthest Leaning Man Made Tower,’ by the Guinness World Records. It leans 18 degrees westwards - more than four times that of Pisa’s famous Leaning Tower. The 160 metre (524.9 ft), 35 storey tower is a postcard image of Abu Dhabi and makes a great holiday snap.
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Senate Square
The Senate Square and its surroundings form a unique and cohesive example of Neoclassical architecture. The square is dominated by four buildings designed by Carl Ludvig Engel (1778-1840): Helsinki Cathedral, the Government Palace, the main building of the University of Helsinki and the National Library of Finland. A statue of Alexander II (1894) stands in the middle of the Senate Square. Helsinki Cathedral is arguably Finland's most famous and photographed building. The oldest stone building in Helsinki is the Sederholm House located on the southeast corner of the square. Today the building hosts the Helsinki City Museum. The Esplanade park and the Market Square are just a block away. The Senate Square also hosts a sound installation called the Sound of the Senate Square. It is a modern version of the European glockenspiel and can be heard every day at 17:49 as it travels from one building to the next. The composition runs for 5 minutes 18 seconds and is composed by Harri Viitanen and Jyrki Alakuijala.
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Sibelius Monument
The world famous composer Jean Sibelius' (1865-1957) monument by Eila Hiltunen is located at the Sibelius park. It was unveiled 7 September 1967. The Sibelius Monument, resembling organ pipes, is made of welded steel with over 600 pipes and with the bust of the composer on one side. The monument is one of Helsinki's most popular statues and one of the most well-known tourist attractions.
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Scott Monument
Standing proudly in Princes Street Gardens, the Scott Monument is one of the most iconic Edinburgh landmarks, a must-visit for tourists and locals alike. Dedicated to Sir Walter Scott, it is one of the largest monuments to a writer anywhere in the world. Sitting proudly at the base of the monument is Sir Walter himself, carved in Carrara marble by Sir John Steel. This monumental statue, fashioned from a single piece of marble weighing 30 tons, took the sculptor six years to complete. It features Scott and his beloved hound Maida. Join one of the tour guides to find out who Sir Walter Scott was, why such an impressive monument was in his honour and enjoy the breathtaking views of Edinburgh from the third-floor viewing platform - a truly unforgettable experience!
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Phuket Big Buddha
Big Buddha Phuket is a 45-meter-tall white marble statue visible from anywhere in the southern part of Phuket. It is probably at the top of everyone’s ‘Must-Do in Phuket‘, and for a good reason. The views from up there are breathtaking. The statue is built with people’s donation and is still under construction. If you feel like doing something to help to finish the broad base of the Buddha, you can sponsor a piece of white marble for 300 to 1,000 baht depending on the size. Phuket Big Buddha started in 2002 as the foundation stone was laid by General Phijit Kulawanich, Privy Councilor on May 22, 2002. The official name is ‘Phraphutthamingmongkhol-akenagakhiri Buddha’ that translates as “Happiness on top of Nakerd mountain”
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Porte Cailhau
Imbued with a long history, the Porte Cailhau offers a magnificent view of Bordeaux. Despite its age (just imagine – it dates from 1494!) this large, beautiful monument remains practically unchanged. It was built to commemorate Charles VIII's victory at Fornovo (Italy). This French king has left his mark on the tower since his likeness decorates a niche on the river side and a notice ask visitors to pay attention to the lintel and reminds them that Charles VIII died from walking quickly into just such a lintel... The Port Cailhau, thirty-five metres tall, was integrated into the city walls. In 1864, it was rented by a public letter writer and a person whose job was to weigh salt. They were both evicted in order to renovate the monument. There is a magnificent view of the oldest bridge in Bordeaux, the Pont de Pierre, from here. An exhibition displays the tools and materials used for construction purposes at the time the Porte Cailhau was built and an audio-visual presentation pieced together from old films immerses us in the world of stone masonry.
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Monument of the Revolutionary Deed
Monument of the Revolutionary Deed is also known as the Revolutionary Memorial Walk and concerns, of course, battles waged in the Rzeszow region. This monument from the beginning aroused much controversy, and various associations. In the stylized laurel leaves some people saw a donkey ears, others had a more obscene connotations. The general contractor was the work of Enterprise Works Road Krakow. Sculptures made in Krakow and they were installed on the monument at the end of 1973/74. In the spring of 1974 the monument was almost ready. In the absence of Wladyslaw Kruczek unveiling of the monument made in the company of George Gawrysiak deserving veterans, fighters, war veterans and accumulated large numbers of society. At the memorial held ceremonies like feta, fits, vows, etc. to give paraded before the grandstand on the May Day demonstrations.
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