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Jewish Museum

Together with the Synagogue and the Jewish Community Center the Jewish Museum Munich forms part of the Jewish Center at St.-Jakobs-Platz. It is situated in immediate proximity to Marienplatz and Viktualienmarkt.

https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/museums/jewish-museum.html

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Asam Church
The late Baroque Asam Church is located on Sendlingerstraße just a few minutes’ walk away from the Sendlinger Tor (Sendling Gate). It was erected between 1733 and 1746 by the Asam brothers and bears the official name of St. Johann Nepomuk. Originally planned as a private church for the builder, its Baroque facade is integrated into the row of houses on Sendlingerstraße. Two massive rocks arise from the base of the columns at the entrance. The luxuriously furnished interior breaks from Baroque convention with its proportional distribution. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/churches/asam-church.html
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St.Peter
"The Kirche St. Peter (“Church of St. Peter”) is one of Munich’s landmarks, the oldest parish church in the city, and is known affectionately by the locals as Alter Peter (“Old Peter”). The church stands on a hill called Petersbergl, which is the only noteworthy elevation within the Munich’s historic Old Town. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/churches/church-of-st-peter.html
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Marienplatz
Marienplatz is the central square in Old Town, Munich’s urban heart and the central point of the pedestrian zone. To the north is the magnificent neo-Gothic Neues Rathaus (“New Town Hall”), to the east the Altes Rathaus (“Old Town Hall”), and the passageway to Tal and the Viktualienmarkt (farmers’ market). To the south, the square is bordered by stores, office buildings, and restaurants. To the west, the pedestrian zone opens to Kaufingerstraße, which ends at the Karlstor (gate) located at the square known by locals as Stachus. Marienplatz has been the center of Munich since it was founded in 1158 and is the heart of the city. In the first few centuries, the approximately 100 x 50 meter large area was used as the central marketplace, which is attested to today by the fish fountain on the northeast corner of Marienplatz. In 1638 Elector Maximilian I had the Mariensäule (Mary’s Column) erected in gratitude for the city being spared during the Thirty Years’ War; Marienplatz takes its name from the Mariensäule. The column is used as a reference point in land surveying as the topological center of Bavaria. Today Marienplatz is a center for festivities and political, cultural, or sports events. During Advent, Munich’s oldest traditional Christmas market (“Christkindlmarkt”) takes place here. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/attractions/marienplatz.html
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Neues Rathaus (New Town Hall)
The Neue Rathaus (New Town Hall) is a magnificent neo-gothic building from the turn of the century which architecturally dominates the north side of Munich’s Marienplatz. The almost 100-meter-long (300 feet) main facade on Marienplatz is richly ornamented in neo-gothic style and shows almost the entire line of the house of Wittelsbach in Bavaria. The Glockenspiel in the tower balcony of the Neues Rathaus is also world famous and worth seeing. Since 1908, figurines representing stories from Munich’s history twirl on two levels daily at 11:00 a.m., 12:00 p.m., and 5:00 p.m. (the 5:00 p.m. show is omitted from November through February). In addition to the well-known coopers dancers, the Münchner Kindl (symbol of the city’s coat of arms), and the angel of peace also make an appearance in the almost 12-minute-long spectacle. At the top of the 85-meter-high (255 feet) tower on the city hall is an observation deck that can be accessed with an elevator and offers a grandiose view of the roofs of the city, even as far as the Alps in nice weather. In the generous and richly painted cellar vault of the Neues Rathaus is the Ratskeller, a traditional Munich restaurant since 1867. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/attractions/new-town-hall-neues-rathaus.html
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Beer & Oktoberfest Museum
Munich is the capital of beer - with six breweries, the Hofbräuhaus and the Oktoberfest. Interested in the story of beer? So go into the Bier- und Oktoberfestmuseum. Learn more about the history of beer from migration of peoples, the monasteries, the purity law, and the unique quality of Munich's beer. And what about the story of the Oktoberfest? Established as the national festival for King Luis's wedding with Princess Theresa from Sachsen Hildburghausen to the world's great fair. Moreover, you can visit one of Munich's historical buildings. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/museums/beer-and-oktoberfest-museum.html
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Munich Residence
The Munich Residence served as the seat of government and residence of the Bavarian dukes, electors and kings from 1508 to 1918. What began in 1385 as a castle in the north-eastern corner of the city (the Neuveste, or new citadel), was transformed by the rulers over the centuries into a magnificent palace, its buildings and gardens extending further and further into the town. The rooms and art collections spanning a period that begins with the Renaissance, and extends via the early Baroque and Rococo epochs to Neoclassicism, bear witness to the discriminating taste and the political ambition of the Wittelsbach dynasty. Much of the Residence was destroyed during the Second World War, and from 1945 it was gradually reconstructed. Today, with the museums of the Bavarian Palace Administration (the Residence Museum itself, the Treasury and the Cuvilliés Theatre) along with other cultural institutions, this is one of the largest museum complexes in Bavaria. http://www.residenz-muenchen.de/englisch/residenc/
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Neue Pinakothek
Outstanding works of European art and sculpture from the late 18th to the beginning of the 20th century are in the spotlight of the Neue Pinakothek. One focus is on the German art of the 19th century - this collection, which goes back to the private collection of King Ludwig I, is one of the most comprehensive of all. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/museums/neue-pinakothek.html
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Deutsches Museum Verkehrszentrum
The Deutsches Museum shows its impressive collection of track and road vehicles in a completely new light. Historical coaches or steam locomotives take you to the roots of mobility. Exhibits and demonstrations clarify the interaction between the pleasure and tribulations of mobility. Motion as the basic principle of life, from inline-skate to Transrapid, is another topic. The exhibition was opened in 2003 in the historic halls of the old Exhibition Center. http://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/museums/deutsches-museum-verkehrszentrum.html
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Nymphenburg Palace
The baroque palace in the west part of Munich was the summer residence of the Bavarian monarchs. Five generations of Wittelsbach rulers were involved in the construction of this stately ensemble, which houses several outstanding collections. With its lavishly decorated interior and the famous "Gallery of Beauties" commissioned by Ludwig I, the palace is one of Munich's favorite attractions. Among the highlights are the former bedroom of King Ludwig II and the impressive banquet hall with fine ceiling frescoes by Johann Baptist Zimmermann. The Nymphenburg Palace west of Munich is one of the largest royal palaces in Europe and is not to be missed on a sight-seeing tour through the Bavarian capital city. The oft-visited Baroque tourist attraction with it’s expansive landscaped garden and museum draws not only guests from around the world, but is also a beloved institution for Munich residents. In 1664, Prince Ferdinand Maria had the castle built as a present to his wife, who had borne him the long-awaited heir, Max Emanuel. Max Emanuel himself later played a significant role in expanding the palace layout. http://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/castles/nymphenburg-palace.html
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Lustheim Palace
Exemplary pleasure palace with novel (for the time) ceiling frescoes. Maximilian Emanuel's "hunting palace" was built to celebrate his marriage to the Emperor's daughter, Maria Antonia, in June 1685. The palace houses an outstanding collection of Meissen porcelain from the Ernst Schneider Foundation. The collection includes over 2,000 valuable plates, table centerpieces and animal figures, and is surpassed only by the collection in the Dresdner Zwinger Palace. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/castles/lustheim-palace.html
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Linderhof Palace
Situated in the midst of the Bavarian Alpine foothills, Schloss Linderhof (Linderhof Palace) attracts visitors to the imperial villa with its spacious landscaped garden and impressive terraces. https://www.muenchen.de/int/en/sights/castles/linderhof-palace.html
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Augsburg Puppenkiste (Puppet Theatre)
Die Kiste,” the museum of the Augsburg Puppet Theatre, is found one floor above the theater in the Heilig-Geist-Spital, a former hospital now preserved as an historical monument http://www.augsburg-tourismus.de/augsburg-city.html
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St. Ulrichs churches
Catholic St. Ulrich’s church: a richly furnished late Gothic basilica built in the architectural styles of Renaissance and Baroque. http://www.augsburg-tourismus.de/augsburg-city.html
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Schaezler Palace
City residence of the banker Liebert von Liebenhofen with a richly furnished rococo banqueting hall (1765-1770), today Germany’s most important baroque gallery. http://www.augsburg-tourismus.de/augsburg-city.html
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Trausnitz Castle
The castle, located above Landshuts and visible from afar, has only been called "Trausnitz" since the 16th century. Until then, it had the same name as the city itself. According to this, the castle was to grant the country "protection" and protection. Under Ludwig the Kelheimer, the founder of Burg and Stadt Landshut in 1204 and an important historical figure at the time of the Crusades, the Wittelsbach main castle had grown to the extent of today's core castle. In 1235, when Emperor Friedrich II was visiting Landshut, the castle was essentially completed. Today the tour takes visitors to the castle through medieval halls such as the impressive vaulted hall of the Alten Dürnitz and the castle chapel with their important sculptural decoration and the winged altars of the rich dukes. Arched cabinets, panelled parlours and the famous stairway with the monumental painted scenes from the Italian Commedia dell'arte represent the era of the Renaissance. The culmination of the castle tour is the view from the Söller on the city. https://www.burg-trausnitz.de/deutsch/burg/index.htm
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The New Castle
In 1418, Ludwig the Bearded laid the foundation stone for the Neue Veste (New Citadel), in the centre of which rises the Neues Schloss. Today, 17 richly decorated cannons in the castle courtyard reflect the scale of the weapons arsenal at that time. http://www.ingolstadt-tourismus.de/en/exploreingolstadt/sightseeing/new-castle.html
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Kreuztor
The most beautiful of all the city's preserved gates, the cross gate, leads from the west into the Old Town. Four small corner towers and sparingly used limestone decorations embellish the red brick gateway tower from the late 14th century, a Romantic witness to medieval architecture. http://www.ingolstadt-tourismus.de/en/exploreingolstadt/sightseeing/kreuztor-emblem-of-the-city.html
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St Matthaeus Church
St Matthäus Church was the first Protestant parish church in Ingolstadt and is the oldest Bavarian church built in this style. The church has a brick architecture typical of the era in which it was built and a striking façade with a single tower. Situated close to the venerable Franciscan Basilica, it still lends a particular appeal to the squares around Schrannenstrasse and Holzmarkt today. http://www.ingolstadt-tourismus.de/en/exploreingolstadt/sightseeing/st-matthaeus-church.html
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Imperial Palace
The Imperial Palace was completed in the year 1500 under Emperor Maximilian I (1459-1519). The palace was built to the same scale as is seen today and was captured as a watercolour by Albrecht Dürer. he painting shows a late Gothic courtyard with covered staircase, a Crest Tower and the women’s quarters (or “women’s rooms”). The reception area, which is known today as the “Gothic Cellar”, was built in the style of a large hall with columns and vaults. A “Kürnstube” (home to Maximilian’s hunting trophies), the “Silver chamber” (treasury) and the Festival Hall (with depictions of Hercules) are also reminders of the time. The “Rennplatz” square in front of the Imperial Palace served as a competition arena to please the sports-loving Emperor. Almost 250 years later, Maria Theresa (1717-1780) visited the Innsbruck palace and deemed it to be behind the times. There hadn’t been any Tyrolean princes since 1665 and the governor, who reigned Tyrol on behalf of the Emperor, lived in the governor’s quarters on the first floor. The representation rooms on the second floor, which were reserved for the Imperial family, were uninhabited. Maria Theresa arranged for the palace to be rebuilt in the Viennese late Baroque style and sent her best artists to Innsbruck: Konstantin von Walter and Nicolaus Parcassi. Martin van Meytens and his school and Franz Anton Maulbertsch were appointed for the interior. The renovations were interrupted by the Seven Years’ War and, therefore, only completed in the 1770s. https://www.innsbruck.info/en/sightseeing/sightseeing/historical-buildings/detail/infrastruktur/imperial-palace-innsbruck.html
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Golden Roof
Innsbruck's most famous landmark shines in the heart of the historic old town. The splendid alcove balcony gets its name from the 2,657 fire-gilded copper tiles that adorn the roof. The building has reigned over medieval houses and shady arcades for over 500 years. It was built by Emperor Maximilian who very much enjoyed the view: from there he would look down over the colourful hustle and bustle of his city, watch jousting tournaments and be revered from below. The shining golden roof can be seen on entering the historic old town but it is also well worth taking a look up close. The structure below the roof is richly adorned with a wide variety of figures and images, including many curiosities. An exposed backside sticks prominently out from the Golden Roof. Admittedly, it is only a few centimetres in size and it belongs to one of the many figures set below the roof. Why bare facts? This question remains unanswered and is one of the many mysteries that surround the landmark. Maybe the revenge of medieval craftsmen who weren't paid? We can only speculate. The front of the structure is decorated with a man and two wives: Emperor Maximilian is portrayed next to his wife of the time Bianca Maria Sforza. He didn't like her much, however, and that is why his first wife – Maria von Burgund – also looks out from the relief. Another eye-catcher: Small men with twisted limbs. They are morisco dancers, who were effectively the breakdancers of the Middle Ages. The Golden Roof is a must-see for anyone visiting Innsbruck. Come to the historic old town and see for yourself. You can't miss it. In the adjoining museum, you can immerse yourself in the time of Emperor Maximilian. https://www.innsbruck.info/en/sightseeing/sightseeing/historical-buildings/detail/infrastruktur/golden-roof-innsbruck.html
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Court Church
The Court Church is also known by locals as “Schwarzmander Church” thanks to the 28 life-size bronze figures that stand guard, watching over the tomb of Emperor Maximilian I. Strange but true: eight of the “Black Men” (Schwarzmander) are actually women and the Emperor’s tomb is empty. But this beautifully crafted masterpiece is still a work of art and wonderful to behold. The Emperor’s tomb takes pride of place in the church. However, the building is also home to legendary local heroes, such as freedom fighter Andreas Hofer. In 1809, Andreas Hofer led thousands of brave Tyroleans against the superior force of Napoleonic troops on Bergisel. He was executed for this in Mantua but is still revered as a hero in Innsbruck. The Court Church is also the final resting place of his fellow soldiers Josef Speckbacher, Joachim Haspinger and Kajetan Sweth. The Silver Chapel is a highlight that shouldn’t be missed on a visit to the Court Church. Two additional famous people from Innsbruck are buried here: Archduke Ferdinand II and his wife Philippine Welser. She was a local superstar during her lifetime: the “Queen of Hearts”, a herbal expert and a bathing beauty who was even accused of witchcraft by malicious tongues. A magnificent silver alter and Madonna by imperial architect Giovanni Lucchese is the main feature of the room alongside another special piece: an organ with pipes made exclusively of wood. https://www.innsbruck.info/en/sightseeing/sightseeing/churches-and-monasteries/detail/infrastruktur/court-church-innsbruck.html
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City Tower
Look out over the rooftops of Innsbruck as the tower guards once did in the Middle Ages. Guards kept watch from the City Tower for almost 450 years, warning citizens of fire and other dangers. The lower storeys also once served as a prison. Today, the tower is there for visitors to enjoy. Over 133 steps lead up to the 31-metre-high viewing platform, which overlooks the medieval streets of Innsbruck and offers stunning views of Bergisel, Patscherkofel mountain, the River Inn and the Nordkette mountain range. The City Tower is a good 50 years older than the Golden Roof. It was completed in 1450 on the side of the old town hall. It doesn’t seem huge in comparison with modern buildings but 51 metres was very impressive in 1450 and the tower was a proud symbol of the self-confidence of the people of Innsbruck. The onion dome was added 100 years after its completion. Today, the tower still rises up majestically from amongst the medieval buildings in the old town – providing a good vantage point and a romantic view of Innsbruck. https://www.innsbruck.info/en/sightseeing/sightseeing/historical-buildings/detail/infrastruktur/city-tower-innsbruck-1.html
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Maria-Theresien-Strasse
Take a stroll, do a bit of shopping, meet friends, sit at one of the many outdoor cafés, admire the magnificent Baroque architecture and savour the city panorama. This is Maria Theresien Street today. But when the street was founded over 700 hundred years ago, there were only a few farm houses here in the New Town. Life still revolved around the Old Town, which was surrounded by powerful medieval city walls and was only accessible from Maria Theresien Street through the St. Jörgen Gate. Today, this marks the start of Herzog Friedrich Straße – the road that leads to the Golden Roof. However, is wasn’t long before members of the aristocracy began building homes just outside the city gates. The location was much more practical thanks to its close proximity to the local rulers of the time – and the new townhouses were also much more comfortable than the draughty old castles outside of town. During the Baroque period, many of these new houses were converted into magnificent palatial residences. And they are still a delight to behold today, for example Palais Gumpp, the seat of the Tyrolean government, or Palais Trapp directly opposite with its enchanting inner courtyard and café. https://www.innsbruck.info/en/sightseeing/sightseeing/historical-buildings/detail/infrastruktur/maria-theresien-strasse-innsbruck.html
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Allsaints Parish Church
It is presumed that a small chapel existed here as early as in the year 800. The All Saints church was first mentioned in historical documents in 1375. https://www.dibk.at/Media/Pfarren/Innsbruck-Allerheiligen#
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Ambras Castle Innsbruck
Ambras Castle Innsbruck is one of the main attractions in Innsbruck, the capital of the Alps. Its cultural and historic significance is inseparable from the personality of Archduke Ferdinand II (1529-1595), who promoted the arts and sciences as a true Renaissance prince. He established the magnificent Ambras collections and had a museum facility built in the lower castle to house them, designed according to modern criteria from the time. The exhibition attempts to reconstruct the Archduke’s chamber of art & curiosities, his armoury, his collection of armour from famous heroes and his collection of antiquities. In Ferdinand’s time, the living quarters were located in the upper castle. Today, the upper castle is home to the Habsburg Portrait Gallery, which features portraits from Albert III (1349-1395) to Emperor Francis I (1768-1835) over three storeys. The collection contains over 200 portraits, including valuable works by famous artists, such as Lukas Cranach, Anton Mor, Tizian, van Dyck and Diego Velásquez. The ground floor of the upper castle houses a collection of late medieval sculptures and the centrepiece is the St George’s altar that belonged to Emperor Maximilian I. https://www.innsbruck.info/en/sightseeing/sightseeing/historical-buildings/detail/infrastruktur/ambras-castle-innsbruck-innsbruck.html
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Archaeological Park Cambodunum
The Archaeological Park (APC) in Kempten invites you on a journey of discovery to the oldest city in Germany mentioned in writing. Temple district, small thermal baths, forum with basilica - a large part of the former Roman provincial capital is still recognizable thanks to unique archaeological finds on the high bank of the Iller in Kempten. From the veneration of pagan gods to ancient architecture to bath culture in the Roman Empire, the accompanying exhibition provides an exciting insight into everyday life two millennia ago. https://www.kempten.de/archaologischer-park-cambodunum-2051.html
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St. Lorenz Basilica
One of the well known church in the city of Kempten. https://www.tourism.de/kempten/
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Zumstein house
The Zumsteinhaus will be designed and designed as Exhibit No. 1 of the museum so that, after successful renovation, it can reveal much about its history, its first inhabitants and its use at that time. https://www.kempten.de/de/33574.php
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192m-Bungy Europabruecke
192 metres! Bungee jumping from the Europabrücke bridge is a truly thrilling and unforgettable experience. Since Rupert Hirner's first jump on 3 October 1993, this famous structure has been transformed into an ultimate highlight of the bungee-jumping world: thousands of daredevils have already taken the leap into the valley below and one of the world's most spectacular bungee jumps is now open to visitors on more than 60 days of the year! https://www.innsbruck.info/en/see-and-experience/special-experiences/special-activities-in-summer/detail/infrastruktur/192m-bungy-europabruecke-patsch.html
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Thurn and Taxis Palace
This magnificent palace emerged from the buildings of the former Benedictine monastery of St. Emmeram. In connection with the abolition of the postal rights the royal house of Thurn and Taxis purchased the greatest part of the monastery buildings in 1810 and extended them to make them their permanent residence. https://tourismus.regensburg.de/en/about-regensburg/sightseeing/more-sights-to-explore/architectural-monuments/thurn-and-taxis-palace.html
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Regensburg Old Town Hall
Today, after numerous additions and alterations, you can admire the three-section building complex dating from the 13th century which consists of the Town Hall tower, the Gothic Imperial Chamber building and the baroque Town Hall. From 1663 to 1806 the Perpetual Imperial Assembly met in the Imperial Chamber. It was there that the well-known expressions “to put something on the long bench” (to postpone something) and “to sit at the green table” (to take important decisions) originated. https://tourismus.regensburg.de/en/about-regensburg/more-sights-to-explore/architectural-monuments/old-town-hall.html
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Historic Town Hall
One of the oldest town halls in Germany and witness to the historical change in Jena. Admire the astronomical clock from the 15th century and "Schnapphans" (snatching Hans), one of the "Seven Wonders" of Jena. https://www.jenatourismus.de/en//353228
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The Stone Bridge
A Wonder of the World: The Stone Bridge. The people of Regensburg were obviously brilliant bridge-builders way back in the 12th century. The “Bruckmandl” however, the little statue on the bridge, didn’t take up his breezy position there till the middle of the 16th century. https://tourismus.regensburg.de/en/about-regensburg/sightseeing/more-sights-to-explore/architectural-monuments/old-stone-bridge.html