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Paris

Country: France
Population:2,110,694
Time Zone:UTC+2
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The Eiffel Tower
The Eiffel tower history represents a part of national heritage. It's as been the symbol of France and Paris for decades. But when Gustave Eiffel achived its construction in 1889, the tower was only meant to be temporary in the Parisian landscape and was far from being the parisians' favourite landmark. Discover the evolution and the history of the Paris Eiffel Tower.The most popular tourist place in Paris has stretched to the Parisian skies for 127 years. Although now symbolic of France, it wasn’t meant to last. Without a doubt, the turning point in the Eiffel Tower history took place at the 1889 Universal Exposition. In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution, a competition was organized with the aim to “build on the Champ-de-Mars an iron tower with a square base, 125 meters wide and 300 meters high.” Out of the 107 proposals submitted, Gustave Eiffel’s was chosen. By his side were engineers Maurice Koechlin and Emile Nouguier as well as architect Stephen Sauvestre.
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Triumphal Arch
Raised over command of Napoleon Ier, the Arch of Triumph dominates the Avenue of the Champs-Elysées. Its construction began in 1806 and ended in 1836, 15 years after the Napoleon's death. It is possible to reach the roof of the monument. The perspective of The Louvre - Concorde Square - Grand Arch of Defense is superb. It's one of the most beautifull panorama of Paris. The site on which the monument stands is called the Place de l'étoile, because of the multicolored star built into the pavement of the roundabout. The arch is 50 meters high, 45 meters wide, and 22 meters thick and is decorated with low relieves which evoke the battles of the French first Republic and Empire periods (1789-1815).
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Grevin Museum Paris
Discover a completely renovated Grévin Museum in Paris. Experience the Spirit of Paris of yesterday and of today with astounding scenes : the major events of the 20th Century, French history and the latest news. The brasserie, the theatre, artists' studios. all the legendary Parisian haunts where you will rub shoulders with the "Tout Paris" celebrities. Three hundred wax figures are waiting to meet you at the Grévin Museum, to be photographed with you, to be remembered forever...
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Louvre Museum
Every trip to the capital deserves a visit to the Louvre to discover the wealth of treasures it contains. The museum houses western works of art dating from the Middle Ages to 1848, in addition to collections of ancient oriental, Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan and Roman civilizations, as well as graphic and Islamic arts. From room to room, the former royal palace reveals its masterpieces to the public: the Mona Lisa, The Raft of the Medusa, the Venus de Milo, and The Winged Victory of Samothrace. In total, there are 35,000 works to be discovered or re-discovered! With its eight hundred year old history, the Louvre has been influenced by numerous architectural trends, from the medieval fortress of the 12th century to the glass pyramid by Pei (1989). The latest addition, housing the Islamic arts section, was designed by architects Mario Bellini and Rudy Ricciotti. The undulating glass canopy covers the Visconti courtyard, flooding the 2,800 m² new wing with light. A visit to the museum is particularly pleasant at night: the Louvre is less crowded and visitors can enjoy stunning night-time views of Pei’s glass pyramid, the Cour Carrée and the Seine.
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Notre-Dame de Paris
The Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris, a masterpiece of Gothic architecture, is the most visited monument in France. It was built in the Middle Ages, at the far end of the Île de la Cité. Work started in the 13th century and finished in the 15th century. Badly damaged during the French Revolution, the cathedral was restored in the 19th century by the architect Viollet-le-Duc. Its many visitors come to admire its stained glass and rose windows, the towers, the steeple and the gargoyles. They can also discover the Notre-Dame treasury and have a go at climbing the towers to enjoy a panoramic view of Paris. In 2013, Notre-Dame is celebrated its 850th anniversary. For this occasion, many events were organized and the cathedral renewed its bells with the arrival of eight new bells as well as a new great bell. Road distances from Paris in France are calculated from point 0 on the cathedral forecourt.
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Le Moulin Rouge
Dinner, dance and show at Le Moulin Rouge will make an unforgettable evening for your stay in Paris. Le Moulin Rouge is certainly the most famous cabaret of the World. Since Henri de Toulouse Lautrec, at the beginning of the twentieth century, le Moulin Rouge is one of the legendary monuments of Paris. Edith Piaf, Yves Montand, Ginger Rogers, Lisa Minnelli, Frank Sinatra are one of the world famous stars who came to Le Moulin Rouge. We can't neither forget the French Cancan's period with La Goulue or Josephine Baker, Mistinguett and Maurice Chevalier. The audience can first come to dinner and second see the cabaret dancing show at 9 or 11 p.m. Topless dancers make you travel across the ages and continents with the FEERIE performance. You'll discover folktales from all over the world, in a festive atmosphere. And you will also see the real French Cancan. The scenes of the show are interspersed with acrobats, and clowns, who are very talented.
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Place de la Concorde
Place de la Concorde is situated at the end of the Champs-Elysées. Today it is famous for the Luxor Obelisk (a 3,300 year old Egyptian obelisk erected on the square in October 1836), the surrounding prestigious hotels, and the two monumental fountains (Fontaine des Mers and Fontaine des Fleuves). Created in 1772, Place de la Concorde was originally known for having been an execution site during the French Revolution. Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette (among others) were guillotined here. Between 1836 and 1846 the architect Jacques-Ignace Hittorf redesigned the square to become what it is today.
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Palais de Tokyo Museum
The Palais de Tokyo, an art deco building that dates from 1937, reopened in 2001 after a new interior design by French architects Anne Lacaton & Jean-Philippe Vassal who selected rough and ready style (concrete floor, wall and roof). Today the most creative and fun museum in Paris, the only one to be open till midnight. The Palais de Tokyo, which is right next door to the Musée d'Art Moderne at the Trocadero, has opened as a showcase for contemporary art. The idea is to have no permanent collections, but to let experimental artists have somewhere in central Paris to express themselves, hence an opening full of “installation” and “interactive” art. There is no permanent collection; instead, dynamic temporary exhibits spread over a large, open space that's reminiscent of a construction site, with a trailer for a ticket booth.
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Quai Branly Museum
The musée du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac is the heir to 200 years of history, enrichment, study and conservation of public collections. It conserves almost 370,000 works originating in Africa, the Near East, Asia, Oceania and the Americas which illustrate the richness and cultural diversity of the non-European civilisations from the Neolithic period (+/-10,000 B.C.) to the 20th century.
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Tuileries Garden
The Tuileries Gardens take their name from the tile factories which previously stood on the site where Queen Catherine de Medici built the Palais des Tuileries in 1564. André Le Nôtre, the famous gardener of King Louis XIV, re-landscaped the gardens in 1664 to give them their current French formal garden style. The gardens, which separate the Louvre from the Place de la Concorde, are a pleasant place for walking and for culture for Parisians and tourists; Maillol statues stand alongside those of Rodin or Giacometti. The gardens’ two ponds are perfect places to relax by. The Musée de l’Orangerie, where visitors can admire the works of Monet, is in the south-west part of the Tuileries. From March to December, free tours in French are organized. Lovers of candyfloss and fairground rides will enjoy the Fête des Tuileries, from June to August.
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Medieval-inspired garden of the Saint-Lazare Maladrerie
This garden "of medieval inspiration" is a recent creation of the services of the Agglomeration of Beauvaisis. It was established in 2009 at the Maladrerie Saint-Lazare, a former leprosarium of the thirteenth century. It is an enclosed garden, structured by hedges of beech and beech. It includes several thematic areas:
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Cathedral Saint Pierre de Beauvais
Attached to the Basse-OEuvre, a remnant of the Cathedral of the year 1000, the Cathedral Saint-Pierre de Beauvais dominates the valley of Thérain by its prodigious proportions. Many hazards during its construction, including the fall of the spire in the sixteenth century. only four years after its elevation, left the building without a nave.
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Astronomical Clock of St. Peters Cathedral
Inside the cathedral, the famous astronomical clock of Beauvais contains a mechanism composed of 90 000 pieces and 68 automatons. Imposing from the height of its 12 meters, this masterpiece of the nineteenth century presents in its dials information on the seasons, eclipses, etc
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Site of Folleville
Remains of a medieval castle and church, with UNESCO World Heritage status due to their connection with the Santiago de Compostella pilgrim way. The church houses the striking tombs of the Lords of Folleville in Carrara marble, an example of the Italian Renaissance having spread as far as Picardy. Below the castle is a village where traces of its past and its setting are reconstituted.
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Digeon Castle Floral Garden
Take a rather surprising tour of the flower garden at the château of Digeon, a magnificent property. The grounds comprise three different worlds: a superb rose garden, a large English-style landscaped garden and a curiously designed vegetable plot. 1 hour away from Amiens, it's well worth a visit!
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The Joan of Arc Historial
The Joan of Arc Historial, the largest site dedicated to the memory of Joan of Arc, is set in the heart of the Archbishop’s Palace of Rouen. Closely linked to Joan of Arc’s destiny, this site of exceptional architectural quality houses the remains of the room known as l’Officialité, the ‘Official Room’, where her sentence was pronounced in 1431, and where her rehabilitation trial took place in 1456.
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Cathedrale Notre-dame
In the heart of the historic city, the cathedral has been the epitome of the development of Gothic art, since the start of its construction in the 12th century on the foundations of a 4th century basislica and an 11th century Romanesque edifice.
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Musee Des Beaux Arts
The Museum of Fine Arts boasts one of the most prestigious collections in France. Paintings, sculptures, drawings and objects of art produced by all schools, ranging from 15th century to the present are on display in a chronological order: Perugino, Veronese, Rubens, Caravaggio, Velázquez, Ribera and Poussin.
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Jules Verne House
After major renovation works, the "House with the Tower" in Amiens, where Jules Verne lived from 1882 to 1900, once again offers visitors space where the imaginary world and the daily life of the famous writer mix. This luxury 19th-century mansion house witnessed the success of the writer, who wrote most of his "Extraordinary Voyages" there. Both imposing and modest, on four levels and through over 700 objects in the Amiens Metropole collection, the house reveals the personality, sources of inspiration and memories of Jules Verne. From the conservatory to the attic, relive the adventures of his heroes: Michel Strogoff, Phileas Fogg, Captain Nemo, etc.
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Musee de Picardie
This charming brick and flint residence is private. Only the grounds can be visited, in summer, by appointment!
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Australian National Memorial near Villers-Bretonneux
This imposing memorial, standing at the end of a vast cemetery, pays tribute to the Australian soldiers who perished during the Great War. It was in Villers-Bretonneux that they finally halted the German offensive in April 1918. Anzac Day is commemorated there every year in April.
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Eglise Notre-Dame de la Neuville
Built in the 15th and 16th centuries, this church has a remarkable tympan on its Flamboyant façade: a large bas-relief depicting Christ's entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday. This beautiful little church is a jewel of the Renaissance period in Corbie.
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Cathedrale Notre-Dame d'Amiens
Proof of real technical genius, the Notre-Dame d'Amiens cathedral demonstrates architectural harmony. Built from 1220 to 1288, its size makes it one of the biggest Gothic buildings ever built: 145 m long, 42 m high, and a total volume of 200,000 m3. Its indoor and outdoor statuary is just as remarkable as its architecture. Since it was restored, the polychromy of its Gothic doors has become the main reference. This revelation gave rise to the "Amiens, a cathedral in colours" show, which offers a reproduction of the original medieval colours.
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Botanical Garden Amiens
A public garden with 18th-century boxwood. Municipal greenhouses. Botanical collections on the theme "plant gardens, customs and men". Accessible to the disabled. After the Alpine rock garden, learn about the evolution of plants with the systematic collection - food plants, medicinal herbs, plants used in different ways in industry. Educational beehive, focus on the Fabaceae (legume, pea or bean) family. Book exchange box also available. A great place for a walk, for discovery and/or improving one's knowledge (each plant is labelled). Relaxing, educational and good for exchanging ideas. Classed as a 'Remarkable Garden' since 2013.
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Picquigny Castle
Take a fresh look at history in the ruined castle of Picquigny. All year round escape game rooms in total historical immersion help you understand fragments of the history of this castle. In summer Picquigny castle is open to the public in the afternoon. Use our well written, illustrated guide to exploring the many facets of this site at your own pace. Treasure hunt for youngsters. In summer there are unusual torchlight tours on Friday evenings or at other times for groups (book ahead). School groups and school holiday leisure centre groups are welcome from April to August for a full or half-day - group workshops (heraldry, illumination, calligraphy, treasure hunt). escape game or torchlight tour. Team building and other private events can be organised with medieval meal and activities and/or escape game. Standing high above the Somme valley for many centuries, the ruins of Picquigny castle are both imposing and picturesque. Climb up to the barbican gate, once a drawbridge, to get a real idea of the castle's past greatness. The tall imposing façade of the main building is truly striking. Then walk along the fortifications to the Gard gateway, the Renaissance style Sévigné wing and the collegiate church open in summer. The Sévigné wing was so named in honour of Madame de Sévigné, a famous woman of letters, who stayed for four days in Picquigny castle in April 1689. When writing to her daughter, Mme de Sévigné compared the castle to that of Grignan and mentioned the river Somme. "After dinner, we arrived here at a mansion that displayed all the pride of the heiress of Pecquigni. It is an old house built on an eminence above the town, like Grignan; a fine chapter, as at Grignan, a dean and twelve canons: I know not whether the foundations be as handsome but there are terraces on the borders of the river Somme which winds in a thousand meanders through the fields, which indeed are not to be found at Grignan.
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Chateau Fort de Rambures
Listed as an historical monument in 1840, this remarkable example of 15th century military architecture is a starred attraction in the Michelin Green Guide and features in France Miniature. This powerful fortress with enormous round towers linked by curtain walls with machicolations and 'chemin de ronde' (high level path round battlements) was designed to resist the artillery of the time.
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The Caves of Naours
The limestone of the Picardy plateau was dug out in many places to form refuges. These refugees were called "muches" (hideouts in Picard language). Those in Naours, rediscovered at the end of the last century, are the largest known: all the underground areas combined can house around 2,600 people with their livestock. The layout is remarkable: around 300 chambers, public squares, stables, wells, chimneys, and a chapel with three naves. These underground areas were used by the British forces during the First World War and were used as the headquarters of the German forces during the second world war. Exhibitions of traditional trades. In the park: games, 2 windmills from the 18th century.
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Reims Cathedral of Notre-Dame
Reims Cathedral is recognised worldwide as one of the defining models of Gothic art. Admire the countless statues under the cathedral glow! No wonder this monument was classed by UNESCO as a world heritage site in 1991... What gives this building its particular character? Its central role played in the history of France for 800 years. Reims Cathedral is where the kings of France were crowned. The cathedral hosted thirty-three sovereign coronations in just over 1000 years! The cathedral also hosted the baptism of Clovis around the year 498, and so kingdom of the Franks was born. This made Reims the chosen city to crown kings.
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Palace of Tau
Transformed at the end of the 17th century by Jules Hardouin-Mansart and Robert de Cotte, the Palace of Tau still holds rooms that have retained their medieval aspect. This is the case with the Palatine Chapel (13th century) and the Tau Room, in which the coronation banquet was held. Decorating the walls are 15th century tapestries which tell the story of "Mighty King Clovis". The royal treasury's most remarkable objects are Charlemagne's talisman (9th century) and Saint Remi's chalice (12th century). The Sainte-Ampoule, or "holy flask", contains the holy oil with which new kings were anointed during the coronation ceremony.
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Saint-Remi Basilique
Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Saint-Remi Basilica is a collection of history and art which should not be missed. The 11th century Romanesque nave was lengthened by two transepts at the end of the 12th century to render it accessible to a greater number of pilgrims. At the same time, the facade was reconstructed, while a choir ambulatory and radiating chapels were created. While the Gothic style is apparent in these transformations, they in no way altered the homogeneity and serenity of the church. It contains Saint Remi's tomb, a collection of 12th century stain-glass windows and a Cattiaux grand organ, inaugurated in the year 2000.
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Doullens Citadel
The origin of the name "Courtgain" comes from "small wages" and it refers to the picturesque sailors' district, crossed by two little parallel streets: the Rue des Moulins and the Rue des Pilotes which ends near the sailors' wayside cross and oratory with wonderful views. The closely terraced houses dating from the late 18th and early 19th century. They are built with bricks, some parts in cob, with a black base, the rest painted in bright colours, according to the age-old tradition of the fishermen who manned the shrimp boats known as "sauterelliers". The district, decked with lovely flowers, stages the Fête de la Mer every summer.
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Basilique Saint-Urbain
Few cities in France can boast of having given a pope to Christianity. Champagne is an exception, with two pontiffs: Urbain II, born in 1042 in Châtillon (Marne), and Urbain IV, born in 1185 in Troyes in a house which disappeared to make way for the Saint-Urbain church. A masterpiece of Gothic art with its superb proportions, its stone lace and its immense canopies, Saint-Urbain is called "the Parthenon of Champagne". The vast portal, covering the entire western part of the building, was completed in 1905, but the tympanum, on which there is a magnificent Last Judgment, dates from the 13th century. Upon entering the church, one is struck by the elegance, the sobriety and the brightness of the place. The surprisingly light transept and choir have retained their magnificent original stained glass windows, dating from around 1270 and restored in 1992 by the Trojan workshops Le Vitrail. The statuary is also admirable, notably the famous Virgin of the Grapes (chapel on the south aisle) whose finesse and meditation are typical of the Trojan School of the 16th century. In 1935, the remains of Urban IV were transferred to the church, which received the title of basilica in 1964.
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Musee Lombart
This museum was donated to the town of Doullens in 1908 by Jules François Lombart, a wealthy chocolate manufacturer and keen art collector. There are works by Corot, Chardin, Daubigny and Poulbot (who came from a local family) plus Egyptian objects, including a mummy, and archaeological finds. The museum with its eclectic collection also has a lovely French formal garden.
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Museum of Modern Art - Former Episcopal Palace
The Museum of Modern Art was born from the donation made to the State in 1976 by Pierre and Denise Lévy, Trojan industrialists and great art lovers.
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MuMa Andre Malraux Museum
The first museum rebuilt in France after the war (by Guy Lagneau and Raymond Audigier, students of Perret) and the first cultural centre on an exceptional site facing the entrance to the port.
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Saint-Joseph church
An uncontested symbol of Le Havre’s renaissance, Saint-Joseph church is an extraordinary edifice: impressive dimensions and its trans-Atlantic style disturb traditional religious references, yet also make it one of the most remarkable constructions of the 20th century in France.
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Les Jardins Suspendus
This incredible 17ha site overlooks the Baie de Seine and has fabulous views of the sea and port. Go through the fort's main entrance and start your visit at the top exploring the four bastions each dedicated to the great botanist explorers and their discoveries.
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Queen Berengaria Museum
Housed in three magnificent half-timbered houses, near the cathedral, this is a charming museum of ethnography and local history (ceramics, furniture, illustrations).
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The Collegiale Saint-Pierre-la-Cour
Place of exhibitions, concerts and cultural events in Le Mans. Backing onto the Roman ramparts, which were altered during the medieval period, is the Collégiale Saint-Pierre-la-Cour, once the chapel of the palace of the Comtes du Maine.
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Victor Hugo Park
Located behind the Prefecture, this garden is maintained by the General Council of the Sarthe. Rather traditional in its design, it offers a resting place in the city center. Games for children.
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Pres-Fichaux Garden
What gives this garden its special charm is the sculpted vegetation: the hedges, the distinctively French lime trees, the immaculate lawns, the beautifully trimmed yews, which are enhanced by the less orderly arrangement of the flower-beds and ponds. The Prés Fichaux, inaugurated in 1930, still boasts typically Art Deco ornaments and statues which earned its addition to the supplementary inventory of historic monuments in 1990.
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Jacques Coeur Palace
Born in Bourges some time around the year 1400, Jacques Coeur rapidly rose to the top of the social ladder. After his appointment as Finance Minister to the King and being made a nobleman, he began the construction of his Palace, which was finished around 1450. This monument was unique in France for its time but illustrates well the original personality of its builder. It is a precursor of the mansions of the Renaissance period: the large main building is constructed against the Gallo-Roman wall. The galleries running around the courtyard link it to the chapel over the main doorway. The façade on the street side and that of the main building are beautifully decorated with Jacques Coeur's royal emblem, together with a multitude of sculptures portraying religious themes, Jacques Coeur's travels or scenes of everyday life.
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Cathedral Bourges
A Royal City since the year 1100, Bourges is growing in size and prosperity. In the upper part of the town, the Great Tower, which is the twin of the keep at the Louvre, is the symbol of Royal Power.