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New Orleans

Population:459,336
Time Zone:UTC-5
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The National World War II Museum
Offering a compelling blend of sweeping narrative and poignant personal detail, The National WWII Museum features immersive exhibits, multimedia experiences, and an expansive collection of artifacts and first-person oral histories, taking visitors inside the story of the war that changed the world.
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Cafe du Monde
The most iconic cafe of New Orleans. The Original Cafe Du Monde Coffee Stand was established in 1862 in the New Orleans French Market. The Cafe is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Original Cafe Du Monde is a traditional coffee shop. Its menu consists of dark roasted Coffee and Chicory, Beignets, White and Chocolate Milk, and fresh squeezed Orange Juice. The coffee is served Black or Au Lait. Au Lait means that it is mixed half and half with hot milk. Beignets are square French -style doughnuts, lavishly covered with powdered sugar. In 1988 Iced Coffee was introduced to the cafe. Soft drinks also made their debut that year.
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St. Louis Cathedral
Facing Jackson Square and flanked by the historic Cabildo on one side and the equally historic Presbytere on the other, St. Louis Cathedral is among the tallest and most imposing structures in the French Quarter. And one of the most recognizable.
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Frenchmen Street
To this day, tour guides tell you that Frenchmen Street is an off the beaten gem, a ‘local’s Bourbon Street’ where the real New Orleanians gather to listen to live music and grab a drink. Excuse a bit of an eye roll on our part; That ‘locals-majority’ term may have rang true at the beginning of the twenty-teens, and to a degree, it’s an accurate description of Frenchmen throughout the 90s and much of the noughties. But the street really achieved a critical mass of popularity post-Katrina, and in the past few years, Frenchmen is tourist central come the evening, especially on weekends. On Frenchmen Street, certain things are just guaranteed: proximity to good music, good food, interesting culture, and an unbeatable street scene.
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St. Louis Cemetery
The most famous cemetery, St. Louis Cemetery #1, is walking distance from the French Quarter and the Downtown area. Located on historic Basin Street, it is the burial place of Marie Laveau, the legendary “voodoo queen.”
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Audubon Zoo
Located in historic Uptown New Orleans Audubon Zoo offers an exotic mix of animals from around the globe, engaging educational programs, hands-on animal encounters and lush gardens. Unique natural habitat exhibits such as the award-winning Louisiana Swamp and Jaguar Jungle showcase the relationship between people and nature. Don't miss the daily animal presentations, chats and feeds; highly endangered whooping cranes, Amur leopards, and orangutans; a tiger; and a mysterious white alligators. Audubon Zoo is often ranked among the country's best for innovation and entertainment value!
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Bourbon Street
This street is a tourism destination for a reason. It’s a thoroughfare with an utterly fascinating history, home to some of the oldest bars, family-run restaurants and gay entertainment districts in the country. In short, while there’s plenty to discover off of Bourbon, there’s a lot to discover on the iconic street as well that may surprise those travelers who turn their nose up at all the flashing lights.
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Royal Street
For a full 13 blocks, Royal Street runs parallel to Bourbon Street, yet this thoroughfare – one of the finest stretches of art galleries, antique stores, wrought iron balconies, restaurants and architecture in the USA – is sometimes almost completely missed by visitors. This is a real shame; beyond the qualities we’ve just described, Royal Street makes a nice counterbalance to the neon and noise of Bourbon.
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Audubon Aquarium of the Americas
Located on the Mississippi River adjacent to the French Quarter Audubon Aquarium of the Americas immerses you in an underwater world. The colors of a Caribbean reef come alive in our walk-through tunnel, while our penguins and Southern sea otter enchant you with their antics. Touch a stingray, feed a parakeet, and marvel at our gigantic sharks and rays in the 400,000-gallon Gulf of Mexico Exhibit. Watch for sea turtles throughout the Aquarium as coordinator of the Louisiana Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Rescue Program, prepared many of them for release to the wild. Also take an underwater adventure into a submerged Maya city! The 4,200 square-foot Great Maya Reef at Audubon Aquarium of the Americas is a walk into a submerged Maya city of the Yucatan peninsula. The adventure begins as visitors walk through the 30-foot-long tunnel into a submerged Maya city of mysterious ruins, surrounded by exotic sea creatures. This underwater world of the ancient, flooded metropolis is alive with lion fish, yellowtail snapper, moray eels, spiny lobsters and more all at home among stunning coral, sunken artifacts and forgotten treasure.
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Jackson Square
Historic Jackson Square, originally known in the 18th century as "Place d'Armes," and later renamed in honor of the Battle of New Orleans hero Andrew Jackson, is a timeless attraction in the heart of the French Quarter of New Orleans. This famous landmark facing the Mississippi River is surrounded by historic buildings, including the St. Louis Cathedral, the Presbytere and Cabildo (Louisiana State Museums), not to mention the Lower and Upper Pontalba Apartments, the oldest apartment buildings in the United States. The Pontalba Apartments offer retail shops, museums, galleries and restaurants on the ground level; their second and third floors still house a selection of prestigious apartments. For well over a half-century, there has been an open-air artist colony at Jackson Square. Local artists paint, draw, create portraits, caricatures, and display their work on the square's iron fence. Some have been there for generations! Jackson Square is a favorite site for visitors and locals. The artists, restaurants, museums, merchants and the square itself make Jackson Square one of the French Quarter's most popular destinations.
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Garden District
Love at first sight is a common experience for first time visitors to the Garden District. It often goes something like this: they’re traveling up St. Charles Avenue via the streetcar when they get their first glance of the oak tree lined streets and historic homes. You can tell by the pristine look on their faces, that the Garden District has started a new found romance. The romance blooms as the afternoon is spent exploring memories of New Orleans’ antebellum past, gazing at secluded mansions, wandering down the brick lined sidewalks. Its canopy of oak trees is world-famous, while its characteristic gardens of hibiscuses and crepe myrtles, angel trumpets and bougainvillea, make it one of New Orleans' most beautiful neighborhoods. The Garden District has worked its magic again.
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Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center
A 103-acre facility dedicated to conservation, education, recreation and tourism. It houses an award-winning, 9500-square-foot building filled with live animal exhibits; photographic presentations of the site's flora and fauna; natural artefact and mineral displays; and a sizeable, vintage waterfowl decoy carving collection. Ecology and art exhibits are featured periodically. Over a mile of gravel paths and boardwalks link varied habitats such as the cypress-tupelo swamp, beech-magnolia and hardwood forests. Wildlife is plentiful at Bluebonnet Swamp, including hundreds of bird species utilizing the site throughout the year. Birders can view seasonal species during peak migrations, as well as year-round residents. While snakes and turtles are commonly seen from the trails, raccoons, rabbits, opossums, armadillos, squirrels, foxes, coyotes, deer and otter are also known to inhabit the site. Nature programs and environmental education are conducted throughout the year including educational group tours, live animal encounters, holiday and summer day camps, toddler activities, birding walks, field trips and special events.
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The Healthcare Gallery & Wellness Spa
The Healthcare Gallery and Wellness Spa in Baton Rouge is the perfect union between a socially-conscious art gallery and a wellness-focused Day Spa. We specialize in curating exquisite spa services and products in a space that will no doubt uplift your Body, Mind & Soul. We believe this holistic approach allows us to focus on these three areas of your life and how they can be optimized to improve your overall sense of well-being. In short, we like to say we are a wellness-focused Day Spa masquerading as an art gallery and we are proud to be the finest and most innovative spa in the region, second to none.
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Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum
Established to provide and sustain a publicly accessible center for the collection, preservation, and interpretation of the material culture, cultural landscapes and vernacular architecture of Louisiana and the Lower Mississippi River Valley. Visitors see how the settlers of Louisiana established an admirable society in spite of great odds, gain insight into the difficulties faced by their ancestors, and learn why Louisianans are a unique people with roots from many parts of the world. Tour 32 historic buildings within the Museum Complex, and the historic Windrush Gardens.
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L'Auberge Casino
Featuring a single-level, 30,000-square-foot gaming floor with 1,500 slot machines and 51 table games, including a poker room; a hotel with 205 guestrooms and a rooftop pool. The casino also includes a multi-purpose event center with concert seating for up to 1,400 people or banquet seating for up to 800 people, a covered parking garage, unique dining options and entertainment venues overlooking the Mississippi River.
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Magnolia Mound Plantation
A 1792 French Creole plantation house authentically restored with outbuildings and gardens covering 15 acres. This landmark is a unique southern Louisiana landmark because of its age, quality of restoration, and outstanding collections. Magnolia Mound's mission is to illustrate and interpret the lifestyle of the French Creoles through educational programs, workshops, lectures, festivals, and other special events. The property includes a historic museum house, an open-hearth kitchen, overseer's house, quarter house, crop garden pigeonnier and carriage house.
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Louisiana Governor's Mansion
Built in 1963 when Jimmy Davis was Governor of Louisiana, the Mansion is located on Capitol Lake near the State Capitol. Because so many antebellum mansions were being destroyed by fire and neglect, Gov. and Mrs. Davis instructed the architects to design a mansion in the Greek Revival style, which was the dominant style in Louisiana after 1830. This period marks a distinct departure from earlier Louisiana architecture. The Mansion contains a total of 25,000 square feet of space in three floors and a basement.
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USS KIDD Veterans Museum
While you are in the Capital City, visit the USS KIDD, which is located in the heart of scenic downtown Baton Rouge. If you're looking for a unique, family-friendly or historical place to visit, the USS KIDD is a perfect attraction for all visitors. WWII Fletcher-class destroyer restored to her 1945 appearance with over 50 inner spaces to see. Veterans Museum displays include a P-40 aircraft, ship models, full-scale replica of gun deck of Old Ironsides, the Louisiana Memorial Plaza a memorial to all Louisiana service members lost in combat, and a Corsair A-7E jet as a memorial to Vietnam Veterans. Allow approximately 1½ hours for touring.
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Manship Theatre
The Manship Theatre offers a unique experience for its theatre audience, 325 front row seats. The theatre, modeled after the style of classic European opera houses, is one of the most beautifully intimate theatres in the United States. With the 11th row as the Manship Theatre's rear seating, the audience member can see eye-to-eye with the performers onstage, and have a once in a lifetime experience.
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Louisiana Art and Science Museum
Featuring exhibitions of internationally renowned artists, a permanent art collection, innovative programming in the state-of-the-art Pennington planetarium, and interactive children's galleries, LASM seeks to enhance the understanding and appreciation of art and science for general audiences and students.
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West Baton Rouge Museum
Dynamic permanent exhibits give a comprehensive view about our history from the Native Americans and European Exploration to contemporary times.
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Baton Rouge Zoo
The Zoo is a place where people connect with animals. Over the past forty years, the Zoo has grown to become the #1 year-round family attraction in Baton Rouge. With more than a quarter-million guests each year, the Zoo attracts visitors of all ages and backgrounds. The Zoo is a favourite place for families and groups to discover the animal kingdom. Meet its animals from all around the world! Say hello to Tapir, Spider Monkey, Bongo, Capybara, Cheetah and many more animals!
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The Red Stick Sculpture
This Baton Rouge landmark is a commemorative sculpture by the late SU Alumni Frank Hayden, erected on the Southern University Baton Rouge campus to mark the site of the famous exchange on Scott's Bluff that gave the city of Baton Rouge its name, meaning "Red Stick" in French. Wondering what "Baton Rouge" means? The story has it that long ago, this area in Louisiana along the mighty Mississippi River was occupied by two indigenous tribes, the Houma Indian Tribe and the Bayougoula Indian Tribe. To settle a border conflict between them, the tribes used a cypress pole to mark the boundary dividing their hunting grounds at an area now known as Scott’s Bluff. This marker on the east bank of the Mississippi River caught the eye of French-Canadian explorer Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville while making his way upriver during an exploration in 1699. He and his men saw the bloodied cypress pole on the bluff, adorned with animal parts and stained red from the tribes’ latest haul, and dubbed the area "le bâton rouge," French for "Red Stick". In 1810, the area became part of the colonies and in 1817, the town was officially incorporated as “Baton Rouge.” Locals still lovingly refer to the city as "The Red Stick."
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Space Center Houston
The Manned Space Flight Education Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational foundation offering extensive science education programs and a space museum. The cornerstone of its education mission is Space Center Houston, a leading science and space exploration learning center. It is one of Houston’s top attractions, the area’s No. 1 attraction for international visitors, the Official Visitor Center of NASA Johnson Space Center and a Smithsonian Affiliate. Since opening in 1992, Space Center Houston has welcomed more than 20 million people and hosts nearly 1.1 million visitors annually in its 250,000-square-foot educational complex.
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Discovery Green
Discovery Green is a beautiful, vibrant 12-acre park in the heart of downtown Houston that opened to the public in April 2008. The park was envisioned by several committed Houston philanthropists, who saw the space as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to create an urban park that would redefine the landscape of downtown. In less than four years, the site that became Discovery Green was transformed from an undeveloped, concrete eyesore into a beautiful and vibrant destination adjacent to the George R. Brown Convention Center.
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Alley Theatre
The Alley Theatre, one of America’s leading not-for-profit theatres, is a nationally recognized performing arts company lead by Artistic Director Gregory Boyd and Managing Director Dean R. Gladden. Home to a Resident Company of actors, the Alley creates a wide-ranging repertoire and innovative productions of classics, neglected modern plays, and premieres.
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Downtown Aquarium of Houston
Downtown Aquarium is the product of redeveloping two downtown Houston landmarks – Fire Station No. 1 and the Central Waterworks Building. This magnificent six-acre entertainment and dining complex is a 500,000-gallon aquatic wonderland, home to over 200 species of aquatic life from around the globe. With a full-service restaurant, an upscale bar, a fully equipped ballroom, aquatic & geographic exhibits, shopping and a variety of amusements, Downtown Aquarium has it all!
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Buffalo Soldier National Museum
Come and visit the historical Buffalo Soldier National Museum and learn more about not only African American history but American history as well. The goal of the Buffalo Soldier Museum is to interpret articulate collect display and preserve historical artifacts documents videos prints and other historical memorabilia which details the history of the brave men and women who overcame extreme adversity while gallantly fighting the great American wars.
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Children's Museum of Houston
The Children’s Museum of Houston is all-new and now twice as big! Rated the No. 1 children's museum in the U.S. by Parents magazine, the Children's Museum is A Playground for Your Mind. The Museum is packed with 90,000 square feet of innovative, interactive bilingual exhibits for kids, ages birth to 12 years, housed in a whimsical Robert Venturi-designed building. Free Family Nights are offered every Thursday from 5 to 8 p.m. Permanent exhibits include: FlowWorks, Kidtropolis, PowerPlay, Cyberspace, EcoStation and many more.
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Houston Center for Contemporary Craft
Houston Center for Contemporary Craft (HCCC) is a nonprofit arts organization founded to advance education about the process product and history of craft. HCCC's major emphasis is on objects of art made primarily from craft materials: clay fiber glass metal wood or found/recycled materials.
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The Health Museum
The Health Museum, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, is a multi-sensory and ever-evolving interactive experience featuring health science advances and the intricacies and implications of how bodies work. The Health Museum offers year-long programs and camps for all ages, special events, corporate rentals and exhibitions including the DeBakey Cell Lab, which puts guests in the center of their own hands-on science exploration.
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Hermann Park
Hermann Park has a bountiful assortment of entertainment: a golf course, an outdoor theater, a jogging track, a beautiful rose garden, picnic spaces, a butterfly exhibit, and even a museum. Hermann Park, presented to the City of Houston by George Hermann in 1914, is Houston's most historically significant public green space. Over the years, the Houston Zoo, Miller Outdoor Theatre, the Houston Museum of Natural Science, Japanese Garden, Rose Garden and Hermann Park Golf Course, one of the first desegregated public golf courses in the United States, all have added to the Park's importance as a recreational destination. Hermann Park, located minutes from downtown Houston, is a cultural and recreational hub surrounded by the Texas Medical Center, Rice University, the Museum District, and various residential neighborhoods. The entrance to the park is at the intersection of Main St. and Montrose Blvd. Upon arriving at Hermann Park the visitor is greeted by a statue of one of Houston's founders, General Sam Houston. He points in, towards the park, leading the park visitor in the direction of it's many amenities.
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Houston Museum of Natural Science
The Houston Museum of Natural Science houses the Burke Baker Planetarium, Wortham Giant Screen Theatre, Cockrell Butterfly Center, and over a dozen permanent exhibit areas that examine astronomy, space, science, Native Americans, paleontology, energy, chemistry, gems and minerals, seashells, Texas wildlife, and more. In addition, the museum frequently presents traveling exhibitions on a variety of topics. The Museum also maintains two satellite facilities: The George Observatory in Fort Bend County which houses one of the largest telescopes in the country that is available for public viewing; and The Houston Museum of Natural Science at Sugar Land which has exhibits on dinosaurs, mineralogy, exotic live insects, and more.
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Houston Zoo
The Houston Zoo will be a leader in the global movement to save wildlife. It has over 6,000 permanent residents (an animals) for whom the Zoo provide housing, meals, medical care, and even education! Each year over two million guests come to experience its incredible variety of animals and ecosystems as well as attend special private and public events and entertainment. The Houston Zoo dedicated staff works around the clock to ensure that the Zoo is always running smoothly for the well being of residents and guests.
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Hines Waterwall Park
Houston’s most photographed site, this dramatic 64-foot U-shaped fountain has water rushing down its inside and outside walls. Designed and created in 1985 by the internationally acclaimed architectural team of Philip Johnson and John Burgee, the Water Wall pumps 78,500 gallons of recycled water every three hours and 20 minutes. More than 180 live oaks shade the three-acre area that plays host to families and couples out for a stroll, picnic, or even a game of Frisbee.
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Fast Track Amusements
Fast Track Amusements is all about fun and games! Whether you're racing one of go-karts, hitting a hole on mini-golf course, playing a video game, or zapping opponents in laser tag arena, you're bound to have fun while at Speedy's Fast Track!
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Stax Museum of American Soul Music
Had it not been for Stax Records founder meeting Memphis music icon Rufus Thomas soon after he started his fledgling Satellite Records in 1957, Stax Records might never have become the soul and R&B powerhouse that it came to be.
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The Pink Palace Family of Museums
The Pink Palace Family of Museums refreshingly doesn’t focus on any one medium or aspect of Memphis culture. It gives visitors an in-depth and unique look at just about everything there is to know about the Mid-South, from cultural and natural history to region-shaping industries and rare oddities.
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The Memphis Zoo
The Memphis Zoo has been named as one of the best zoos in the country according to TripAdvisor, and for good reason! From the time you step inside the grand entrance, you know you’re in a very special place. The main entrance and courtyard pays honor in its design to the ancient city of Memphis, Egypt. The meandering streams, crisp waterfalls, native plants and tranquil gardens alone are a great reason to visit. With 19 unique exhibits and thousands of animal species, you can “travel around the world” within the perimeters of the zoo. Visit Teton Trek which brings the Yellowstone National Park to Midtown. The Great Lodge and replica of Old Faithful are surrounded by grizzly bears and wolves. (And yes, you can play in the geyser.) Catch a playful sea lion performance at Northwest Passage where you can also get nose-to-nose with polar bears, see totem poles (that actually received a Native American blessing), bald eagles, black bears, and the list goes on. Pay a visit to China where you can stand a few feet away from giant pandas, Le Le and Ya Ya. The Memphis Zoo is one of only four zoos in the United States to provide this rare opportunity.
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Delta Flight Museum
The Delta Flight Museum offers a one-of-a-kind experience. Features include interactive exhibits and rare artifacts, cutting-edge technology, unique event spaces and an innovative focus on the future of aviation. At the Museum guests can get an up-close look at historic aircraft dating back to the 1920s, fly the only Boeing 737 flight simulator open to the public, host events in a distinctive setting that offers historic glamour with modern appeal and shop for unique aviation souvenirs.
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Underground Atlanta
Six historic city blocks in the heart of Atlanta transformed into an urban market with unique shopping, dining, entertainment and nightlife!
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Centennial Olympic Park
Centennial Olympic Park was created as a 21-acre gathering spot for visitors and residents to enjoy during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games. It's estimated $75 million in development costs came entirely from private-sector donations - contributions in the form of commemorative bricks, funds raised by the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, and local philanthropic foundation grants. Following the Olympic Games, a large portion of the park was closed and redesigned for daily public use. Today the park performs a dual mission: it serves as Georgia's lasting legacy of the Centennial Olympic Games, and it anchors efforts to revitalize residential and commercial development in Georgia's capital city of Atlanta. The Park sponsors community-wide free events, including the Fourth of July Celebration and Fourth Saturday. The Park also hosts festivals, fundraisers, and private events. These events, in addition to the normal day-to-day traffic, bring an estimated three million visitors to this urban oasis each year.
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Georgia Aquarium
Georgia Aquarium is a nonprofit committed to inspiring awareness and preservation of our ocean and aquatic animals worldwide.
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World of Coca-Cola
World of Coca-Cola at Pemberton Place® celebrated its Grand Opening on May 24, 2007. It’s the only place where you can explore the fascinating story of Coca‑Cola® – the world’s best-known beverage brand. Learn a little more about us before your visit.