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Washington

Population:7,615,000
Time Zone:UTC-4
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Washington Monument
Built to honor George Washington, the United States' first president, the 555-foot marble obelisk towers over Washington, D.C.George Washington's military and political leadership were indispensable to the founding of the United States. As commander of the Continental Army, he rallied Americans from thirteen divergent states and outlasted Britain's superior military force. As the first president, Washington's superb leadership set the standard for each president that has succeeded him. The Washington Monument towers above the city that bears his name, serving as an awe-inspiring reminder of George Washington's greatness. The monument, like the man, stands in no one's shadow.The Washington Monument, designed by Robert Mills and eventually completed by Thomas Casey and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, honors and memorializes George Washington at the center of the nation's capital. The structure was completed in two phases of construction, one private (1848-1854) and one public (1876-1884). Built in the shape of an Egyptian obelisk, evoking the timelessness of ancient civilizations, the Washington Monument embodies the awe, respect, and gratitude the nation felt for its most essential Founding Father. When completed, the Washington Monument was the tallest building in the world at 555 feet, 5-1/8 inches.
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Lincoln Memorial
"In this temple, as in the hearts of the people for whom he saved the Union, the memory of Abraham Lincoln is enshrined forever."Beneath these words, the 16th President of the United States—the Great Emancipator and preserver of the nation during the Civil War—sits immortalized in marble. Since its dedication on Memorial Day, 1922, the Lincoln Memorial has become the site of some of the nation’s most important social demonstrations, perhaps most notably Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.Lincoln is surrounded by 36 Doric columns, one for each state at the time of his death. By the time construction was finished, 12 more states had joined the Union, so the names of all 48 states are carved around the top of the 99 foot tall structure. A plaque for Alaska and Hawaii was added later. The Southern and Northern interior walls of the memorial are inscribed with the full text of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and 2nd Inaugural Address, respectively. Construction was completed in May, 1922 and the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated on Memorial Day, May 30, 1922.
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National Museum of Women in the Arts
On the first Sunday of the month, one of the District’s most intriguing museums waives its admission charge. During Free Community Day, the National Museum of Women in the Arts opens up its collection and features programs that connect to its current exhibitions, helping you to discover the immense impact that women have on the world of art.
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National Portrait Gallery
Painting a picture of the many influential people throughout America’s history, the National Portrait Gallery is a must-see for pop culture fans, history buffs and art lovers alike. From activists and actors to presidents and poets, the museum displays paintings, photographs and sculptures of the people that have come to define America as we know it.
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Renwick Gallery
Permanent collection and exhibitions of American crafts. This gem of a museum, located in a historic building near the White House, is dedicated to exhibiting the finest American crafts from the 19th century to the present.
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World War II Memorial
The stunning National World War II Memorial is one of the National Mall’s most popular destinations. The memorial features two 43-foot arches, a 17-foot pillar for each state and a field of 4,000 gold stars, all in honor of those who served and supported the efforts from home. If you want to honor local World War I participants, stop by the nearby DC War Memorial, one of the Mall’s hidden gems.
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Museum of the Bible
Although donations are suggested for entry into this colossal museum, there is no admission charge. As soon as you enter the Museum of the Bible through its 40-foot bronze doors, its majesty is undeniable. Beyond its awe-inspiring grand lobby, you will find 430,000 square feet of exhibits that cover the history of the Bible, its many narrative forms and its impact on societies around the world.
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Rock Creek Park
DC’s ultimate outdoor mecca is Rock Creek Park, a 4.4-square-mile expanse that includes numerous trails for hiking, biking and exploring. There’s more to like about the park, too, like a nature center, picnic areas, riding stables, tennis courts and Peirce Mill, an historical site.
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Theodore Roosevelt Island
Reachable by footbridge off the George Washington Memorial Parkway, Theodore Roosevelt Island pays homage to the great conservationist. You will find nearly two miles of trails that traverse through forest and wetland, as well as a 17-foot statue dedicated to the historic figure. Via the trails, you can encounter beautiful views of the Potomac River.
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B&O Railroad Museum
This fascinating, fun place for kids, families and lovers of history features the most important railroad collection in America, and features seasonal train rides and free parking.
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Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum
Located two blocks from Camden Yards, this National Historic Site is Babe Ruth's birthplace and features rare artifacts, photos, videos and more. George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Baltimore's native son who became America's first sports celebrity and an international icon.
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The Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower
The Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower has been a Baltimore landmark since its construction in 1911. The Baltimore Office of Promotions & The Arts has transformed the Tower into a space for visual and literary artists.
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Ripley's Believe It or Not!
Experience three unique attractions including Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Odditorium, Ripley’s Moving Theater where you ride the movies, and 2,000 sq. ft. of the mind-bending Marvelous Mirror Maze!
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Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church
Brown Memorial has thrived as an urban congregation since 1869 and houses one of the world’s largest Tiffany window collections and a Skinner pipe organ.
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Maryland Zoo
A 135-plus acre zoo nestled in Druid Hill Park, the Maryland Zoo is the third oldest zoo in the country. Maryland Zoo is Baltimore's wildest attraction! The zoo is home to 1,500 exotic mammals, encompasses birds, amphibians and reptiles representing nearly 200 species.
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National Great Blacks In Wax Museum
National Great Blacks In Wax Museum is American first wax museum of African American history and culture features more than 150 life-size and lifelike wax figures.
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Historic Cold Spring Village
Visit 26 restored historic buildings on 30 shaded acres where interpreters in period clothing bring the 1800s to life. Enjoy demonstrations of blacksmithing, basket weaving, book binding and more! Farm animals, carriage rides, and family activities from June-September. Special weekend events. Country Store, Ice Cream Parlor and Restaurant. Education and distance learning programs from October-May.
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Boathouse Row
Local boating clubs take great pride in their historic 19th-century boathouses, which line the Schuylkill River just west of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. At night, lights outline one of the city’s loveliest views, aptly named Boathouse Row. Rowers of all ages and skill levels flock to the Schuylkill River to practice, compete, learn and explore the sport of rowing along Boathouse Row, be it a single rower on a peaceful early morning or an exciting weekend regatta with lots of noise, colors and fanfare. Sandwiched between Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill River, Boathouse Row features a series of historic structures. Sandwiched between Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill River in Fairmount Park, Boathouse Row features Lloyd Hall recreation center and historic rowing clubs claiming the next 10 buildings all the way to the Sedgely Club, a private social enclave, which rounds out the Row.
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Philadelphia Museum of Art
Founded in 1876, the Philadelphia Museum of Art showcases more than 2,000 years of human creativity, the collections and special exhibitions present masterpieces of painting, sculpture, decorative arts and architectural settings from Europe, Asia and the Americas.
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Rodin Museum
The repository of the largest collection of works by Auguste Rodin outside of Paris features treasures such as The Gates of Hell and a bronze caste of The Thinker. All told, you’ll find more than 120 of the French master’s sculptures here, as well as a fascinating collection of drawings, paintings and studies. The variety of works on hand offers the perfect opportunity to contrast and compare the ways in which Rodin used and re-used the same stances, and even body parts, throughout his work.
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Love Park
Philadelphia’s iconic John F. Kennedy Plaza better known as LOVE Park is currently receiving some much-needed love, care and 21st-century upgrades. The overhaul to the popular public space includes adding green space, structural improvements, installing a new water feature, creating concession areas and opening up access to the park. LOVE Park gets its nickname from Robert Indiana’s iconic LOVE statue, which has resided in the space almost continuously since 1976.
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Fairmount Park
Fairmount Park boasts many architectural treasures, seven of which are maintained as historic house museums open to the public. Located on the banks of the Schuylkill River, these homes originally served as the rural summer villas for well-to-do families during the eighteenth- and early-nineteenth century.
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Reading Terminal Market
This indoor foodie paradise is an almost unbelievable one-stop shop for everything from local produce and meats to artisanal cheeses and desserts. The public space also provides open seating where customers can enjoy meals from more than 30 restaurants, ranging from hot roast pork sandwiches from DiNic’s to duck noodle soup from Sang Kee Peking.
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Venice Island Performing Arts and Recreation Center
Venice Island Performing Arts and Recreation Center's mission and priorities have emerged from the hopes and aspirations expressed by City of Philadelphia and Manayunk neighborhood leaders, the Executive Advisory Board, and over 500 residents who participated in surveying and community conversations.
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Flight 93 National Memorial
Flight 93 National Memorial is a place to learn about the 40 passengers and crew members of Flight 93 whose actions thwarted the hijackers’ attempt to target Washington, DC, and most likely the US Capitol. The memorial is a place to walk beside their final resting place and honor the extraordinary courage of those who fought back against the terrorists.
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Storybook Land
For 65 years, since its establishment in 1955, Storybook Land has been keeping the spirit of childhood alive in an entertaining and educational atmosphere. We invite you to relive your childhood while introducing the innocent themes of wonderment to an entire new generation. Your children’s - and grandchildren’s - memories will be with them throughout their lifetimes! The timelessness of childhood will ring true as your family literally walks through its all-time favorite stories and nursery rhymes at Storybook Land. Children’s classics are interspersed with exciting new family rides and attractions in a remarkably clean and enjoyable park setting. Join us several times a year for memorable family experiences. You are certain to enjoy your visits!
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Lucy the Elephant
Lucy the Elephant was built by real estate developer, James Lafferty, in 1881, as a gimmick to attract potential buyers to his land holdings along the coast of South Atlantic City (now Margate). Eventually, a popular hotel business was built around Lucy. Presidents and royalty came from around the world to stay at the neighboring Elephant Hotel and climb the stairs to Lucy's howdah. During her history, Lucy has survived hurricanes, ocean floods, and even a fire accidentally started by some inebriated party-goers when she served as a tavern. However, by the 1960's it became apparent there was one disaster Lucy could not overcome - neglect. By that time, the once proud jewel of the South Jersey coast had become an almost hopeless, wretched wreck. Then in 1970, a developer purchased Lucy's land and intended to build a condominium building on the site. The beach and the ocean could stay - but the elephant had to go! To the rescue came the Save Lucy Committee. Within weeks, this small concerned group of ordinary citizens had raised enough money to move the entire decaying structure two blocks away to a new site owned by the city. Thirty years and over 1.5 million dollars later, Lucy was completely restored to her original splendor, inside and out. In 1976, Lucy was designated a National Historic Landmark by the United States government as the oldest surviving example of a unique form of "zoomorphic" architecture, and the oldest "roadside" attraction in America. Today, she stands as the most popular non-gaming attraction in the greater Atlantic City region. She has brought fame to Margate City and is known all over the globe as "The World's Largest Elephant."
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Boardwalk
Atlantic City Boardwalk is known for the roaring sea and dozens of confection shops and amusements. It is the cherished blue property of the most popular board game in the world. It is truly the walk that inspired many more, but can never be duplicated. Over a century after its emergence and evolution, the Boardwalk still stands as a historic American symbol of good times and rich culture. Some may still believe that Atlantic City’s future rides on the roll of a dice. They just might want to take a stroll on that timeless Boardwalk to realize this city is going nowhere but up. Place your bets!
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Civil Rights Garden
The Civil Rights Garden is a tranquil public sculpture garden comprised of 11 granite columns, winding pathways, plants, flowers, Gingko trees and sculptures with inscriptions related to the history, events and people of the Civil Rights movement.
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Steel Pier
1000 Feet of Over-the-Ocean Fun! Located on the world-famous boardwalk in Atlantic City, just steps from casino resorts and New Jersey’s beautiful miles of beach, the Steel Pier is shore to excite you. Whether you are skyrocketing to the stars over the ocean or gathering for an event with the best view in town, the Steel Pier offers some kind of fun for everyone! Whatever you choose, brace yourself for great action! The history of the Steel Pier has changed like the tides in the ocean below it since it was founded in 1898.
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Atlantic City Aquarium
The Atlantic City Aquarium is home to over 100 varieties of fish and marine animals. Get up close with SHARKS! Our tropical shark touch tank gives visitors an opportunity to touch several species of sharks. The Mid Atlantic Coastal Zone encourages visitors to touch a variety of local organisms such as Horseshoe Crabs and Sea Urchins. Be sure to say hello to "Groman" our resident Loggerhead Sea Turtle as he cruises around his 25,000 gallon home. The Aquarium also houses moray eels, moon jellies, seahorses and diamondback terrapins just to name a few. SEA OUR SHOWS: Live Dive Feeding Show, Exotic Animal Show (call for times) and daily feedings at Stingray Touch Tank. From fun and educational children's birthday parties, an elegant wedding reception, a fabulous picnic, corporate meeting or a one of a kind special affair the Atlantic City Aquarium will exceed your expectations for a truly unique and memorable event.
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Absecon Lighthouse
The view from New Jersey’s tallest lighthouse is just what you’d expect: breathtaking. It’s perhaps the only fitting reward for climbing the 228 stairs it will take you to get to the top. The Absecon Lighthouse was the brainchild of Dr. Jonathan Pitney, who many refer to as “the father of Atlantic City.” Pitney first proposed the lighthouse in 1830; the government was late in responding to the request and concluded more than a decade later that a lighthouse was unnecessary. Pitney wrote letters and gathered petition signatures for several years before the lighthouse was finally approved and completed in 1857. The 171-foot lighthouse (the third-tallest in the U.S.) shone with a kerosene flame through a French-made first-order Fresnel lens, though the kerosene light was eventually replaced with an electric one. Today the lighthouse is a landmark tourism attraction, drawing visitors from around New Jersey and the country.
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Tuckerton Seaport
A working maritime museum located along the historic Tuckerton Creek, Tuckerton Seaport is only 25-minutes from Atlantic City. The museum celebrates life on the Jersey Shore with many events and activities for all ages and interests. Watch history come alive as docents build boats, carve decoys, discuss clam digging, and more. Open 7-days a week.
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Frick Art & Historical Center
Visitors will enjoy the Frick Art Museum; the Car and Carriage Museum; Clayton, the restored 19th-Century Victorian home of Henry Clay Frick; the Cafe at the Frick; the Greenhouse; and the Visitors' Center which once served as the Frick children's playhouse.
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Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens
Explore the beauty and wonders of nature at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, encompassing 15 acres including a 14-room glasshouse and 23 distinct gardens. Experience industry-leading sustainable architecture and green practices, stunning seasonal flower shows, exclusive commissioned exhibits, renowned orchid and bonsai collections and more.