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Architecture in Washington

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Washington Monument
Built to honor George Washington, the United States' first president, the 555-foot marble obelisk towers over Washington, D.C.George Washington's military and political leadership were indispensable to the founding of the United States. As commander of the Continental Army, he rallied Americans from thirteen divergent states and outlasted Britain's superior military force. As the first president, Washington's superb leadership set the standard for each president that has succeeded him. The Washington Monument towers above the city that bears his name, serving as an awe-inspiring reminder of George Washington's greatness. The monument, like the man, stands in no one's shadow.The Washington Monument, designed by Robert Mills and eventually completed by Thomas Casey and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, honors and memorializes George Washington at the center of the nation's capital. The structure was completed in two phases of construction, one private (1848-1854) and one public (1876-1884). Built in the shape of an Egyptian obelisk, evoking the timelessness of ancient civilizations, the Washington Monument embodies the awe, respect, and gratitude the nation felt for its most essential Founding Father. When completed, the Washington Monument was the tallest building in the world at 555 feet, 5-1/8 inches.
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The Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower
The Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower has been a Baltimore landmark since its construction in 1911. The Baltimore Office of Promotions & The Arts has transformed the Tower into a space for visual and literary artists.
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Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church
Brown Memorial has thrived as an urban congregation since 1869 and houses one of the world’s largest Tiffany window collections and a Skinner pipe organ.
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Historic Cold Spring Village
Visit 26 restored historic buildings on 30 shaded acres where interpreters in period clothing bring the 1800s to life. Enjoy demonstrations of blacksmithing, basket weaving, book binding and more! Farm animals, carriage rides, and family activities from June-September. Special weekend events. Country Store, Ice Cream Parlor and Restaurant. Education and distance learning programs from October-May.
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Boathouse Row
Local boating clubs take great pride in their historic 19th-century boathouses, which line the Schuylkill River just west of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. At night, lights outline one of the city’s loveliest views, aptly named Boathouse Row. Rowers of all ages and skill levels flock to the Schuylkill River to practice, compete, learn and explore the sport of rowing along Boathouse Row, be it a single rower on a peaceful early morning or an exciting weekend regatta with lots of noise, colors and fanfare. Sandwiched between Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill River, Boathouse Row features a series of historic structures. Sandwiched between Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill River in Fairmount Park, Boathouse Row features Lloyd Hall recreation center and historic rowing clubs claiming the next 10 buildings all the way to the Sedgely Club, a private social enclave, which rounds out the Row.
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Fairmount Park
Fairmount Park boasts many architectural treasures, seven of which are maintained as historic house museums open to the public. Located on the banks of the Schuylkill River, these homes originally served as the rural summer villas for well-to-do families during the eighteenth- and early-nineteenth century.
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Absecon Lighthouse
The view from New Jersey’s tallest lighthouse is just what you’d expect: breathtaking. It’s perhaps the only fitting reward for climbing the 228 stairs it will take you to get to the top. The Absecon Lighthouse was the brainchild of Dr. Jonathan Pitney, who many refer to as “the father of Atlantic City.” Pitney first proposed the lighthouse in 1830; the government was late in responding to the request and concluded more than a decade later that a lighthouse was unnecessary. Pitney wrote letters and gathered petition signatures for several years before the lighthouse was finally approved and completed in 1857. The 171-foot lighthouse (the third-tallest in the U.S.) shone with a kerosene flame through a French-made first-order Fresnel lens, though the kerosene light was eventually replaced with an electric one. Today the lighthouse is a landmark tourism attraction, drawing visitors from around New Jersey and the country.
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Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art is arguably the first museum of contemporary art in the United States, collecting the "old master of tomorrow" since the inception of the Carnegie International in 1896. Today the Museum of Art is among the most popular and esteemed cultural institutions in the region, providing visitors with access to great works of art, studio art classes, and interpretive programs that inspire, provoke, and delight. Carnegie Museum of Art has collection of more than 32,000 objects features a broad spectrum of visual art, including painting and sculpture; prints and drawings; photographs; architectural casts, renderings, and models; decorative arts and design; and film, video, and digital imagery. The museum also houses the archive of over 70,000 negatives by photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris.
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Carnegie Museum of Natural History
Carnegie Museum of Natural History, one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, is among the top natural history museums in the country. It maintains, preserves, and interprets an extraordinary collection of artifacts, objects, and scientific specimens used to broaden understanding of evolution, conservation, and biodiversity.
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Statue of Liberty
The Statue of Liberty is perhaps New York City's most familiar landmark and the easiest one to overlook since it's only accessible by boat. This historic monument has welcomed so many generations of hopeful Americans to our shores. The American Family Immigration History Center at Ellis Island contains more than 25 million Port of New York passenger arrival records and 900 ship pictures circa 1892–1924.
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Brooklyn Bridge
Stretching across the East River, the iconic Brooklyn Bridge opened up back in 1883 to carry traffic (nonautomotive at the time) between Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn. One of the most recognizable parts of the New York City skyline, the bridge has been featured in movies and on television shows, and is a real piece of New York City history. A stroll across the elevated pedestrian walkway provides a true New York City experience. The Manhattan-side entrance is at Park Row and Centre Street, across from City Hall Park, east of City Hall; over on the Brooklyn side, enter at Cadman Plaza East or where Boerum Place meets Tillary Street.
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Empire State Building
The world-famous Empire State Building located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, our 86th and 102nd floor observatories provide unforgettable 360° views of New York City and beyond. Whether you’re in town for a week or a day, no visit to NYC is complete without experiencing the top of the Empire State Building. The Empire State Building is more than a spectacular view. It’s an immersive experience inside a world famous landmark. In addition to our Observation Decks, your visit includes the newly restored lobby with its stunning art deco ceiling murals, the historical Dare To Dream Exhibit, and the Sustainability Exhibit.
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Times Square
Flashing neon lights and giant digital billboards. Brilliant Broadway marquees. Costumed characters and musicians. Times Square is big, bright and unforgettable. Its main junction is filled with popular retailers—plus the TKTS discount booth, which offers up to 50 percent off theater tickets. Walk to the top of its red steps—you may know them from the "Empire State of Mind" video—for a sweeping view of the area, including One Times Square, the building from which the ball drops on New Year's Eve.
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Rockefeller Center
A visit to New York City wouldn't be complete without a trip to Rockefeller Plaza, where skaters glide across the rink and thousands of lights gleam from the always-enormous Christmas tree in the winter, and outdoor dining options abound in the warmer months. No matter the season, come for the shops (from the FDNY Fire Zone store and museum to Swarovski), the eats (from Dean & DeLuca to Mendy's Kosher Deli) and the stargazing here in NBC Studios' backyard. The three observation decks at Top of the Rock showcase the City's spectacular skyline.
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St. Patrick
St. Patrick's Cathedral is the Mother Church of the Archdiocese of New York and the seat of the Archbishop. Located on Fifth Avenue, across from Rockefeller Center, the sanctuary is the largest Gothic Catholic cathedral in the US. This international landmark, dedicated in 1879, welcomes more than five million visitors each year. With its 330-foot spires, it is one of the City's most spectacular architectural sights. Inside, it boasts a seating capacity of 2,400, numerous altars and stained glass windows, and a giant organ with 7,855 pipes.
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Blandwood Mansion
A National Historic Landmark; originally constructed in 1795, Blandwood later served as N.C. Governor John Motley Morehead’s home. In 1844, A.J. Davis designed an addition, transforming the farmhouse into an Italianate wonder. Visit today to see the original architecture and family furnishings
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Akron Art Museum
Volunteers were the sole staff until 1924 when city support made it possible to hire a professional director. The Great Depression tightened finances and ended City funding, forcing the institute to again rely entirely on volunteers from 1931 to 1945. It functioned — much of that time in borrowed spaces — as an art center, offering classes and exhibiting mostly local artists. The collection was small, eclectic — containing archaeological artefacts and decorative as well as fine art — and composed entirely of gifts. In 1937 the institute moved into its first permanent home, a historic mansion. Just four years later, a disastrous fire destroyed the building and much of the collection, threatening the institute’s existence. Over the next quarter-century, the museum has continued to enrich the lives of those in Northeast Ohio and beyond through modern and contemporary art. Its nationally recognized collection was documented through the publication of collection catalogues. Three acquisitions endowments were created to ensure the collection’s future growth. A greatly enlarged general endowment provided increased, more stable funding, allowing the staff to undertake ambitious programs and exhibitions with national and even international impact. In 2007, its eighty-fifth year, the museum more than tripled in size with the opening of the new John S. and James L. Knight Building, which adjoins the 1899 building. Spanning three centuries, like the museum’s collection, together they symbolize the museum’s dual role as preserver of the past and herald of the future.
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Richard Howe house
As the resident engineer of the Ohio & Erie Canal from 1825 to 1832, Howe supervised the completion of the Ohio & Erie Canal from Cleveland to Massillon. Howe's responsibilities included engineering and designing the canal prism and locks between Massillon and Cleveland, including the fifteen-step lift locks built in the Cascade Locks Park.
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Seneca Buffalo Creek Casino
Seneca Buffalo Creek Casino is the latest attraction in the rapidly developing Cobblestone District along with Buffalo, N.Y.’s Inner Harbor and is located just minutes from the Peace Bridge to Fort Erie, Canada, and a half-hour from Niagara Falls. The property is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. Guests can enjoy more than 800 slot machines and 20 table games, The Creek, The Creek Stop, Stixx Sports Bar and WD Bar & Grille. Exit 6 offers Tax-Free retail shopping with all your favourite brands including local Buffalo and sports team apparel. More information is available by calling or visiting the website.
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Buffalo Lighthouse
Located at the mouth of the Buffalo River at the north entrance to Buffalo Harbor. Grounds with historic artefact displays and cell phone tour open to the public during scheduled daylight hours. Tower open on scheduled tour days posted on Facebook or by appointment, for per-person or group fees. Group tours may be scheduled at buffalolightshines@gmail.com, subject to availability on days the tower is not open for general admission. Groups tours have more time to view the panoramic Buffalo waterfront vista from the premier view atop the 1833 lighthouse.
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Buffalo City Hall
From the architects George J. Dietel and John J. Wade, Buffalo City Hall was built between 1929-1931. Buffalo City Hall is an Art Deco masterpiece with outstanding murals depicting the city’s history and industry. Common Council Chamber with exquisite skylight and sculptures are a must-see. Observation Tower gives a spectacular view of the waterfront and the Ellicott radial street design for Buffalo. Closed weekends and holidays.
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The Buffalo History Museum
This National Historic Landmark building was built in 1901 during the Pan-American Exposition, and now houses The Buffalo History Museum (renamed in 2012). Research library includes a repository of genealogical information; the museum features exhibits and an extensive collection of artefacts, manuscripts, books and photographs chronicling the development of Buffalo and the Niagara Frontier.
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Geva Theatre Center
Founded in 1972, Geva serves up to 160,000 patrons annually, including more than 16,000 students. Geva’s productions are created and rehearsed in and for Rochester.
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Blue Cross Arena at War Memorial
Sports and entertainment facility. Host of family shows, professional sports, and concerts. Meeting rooms and catering available.
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Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village
When you explore Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village, you travel back to a time when life moved at a gentler pace, when families shared work and played together, when the proud heritage of our region was just beginning. You can experience that heritage as it comes to life on our beautiful 35-acre grounds. Enjoy interactive local history exhibits, including a replica canal packet boat and port town. Tour 11 historic buildings from the Buffalo Niagara region and interact with life as it was in the 19th century. Immerse yourself in the excitement of special events that celebrate the culture and history of the Buffalo Niagara region. Engage in the immersive programming of our robust educational events. Join a Guild and dive into our many maker arts opportunities in brewing, blacksmithing, woodworking, quilting, lacemaking, weaving, and music. Register for hands-on workshops in time-honoured trades and bring history to life with your very own hands. And more! Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village’s mission is to preserve and interpret the story of Buffalo Niagara for the people of today and the community of tomorrow.
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German Village
And for family, friends, and visitors, it’s also a home away from home. That’s because you don’t have to live in German Village to live here. In German Village, its mission is simple: preserve, protect and promote life among the bricks. German Village Business Community is a collection of independent businesses, sharing resources and working together to promote the historic business community of German Village. Whether you’re planning a night out on our bricks or visiting for the weekend, you’ll find what you’re looking for when you click Shop. Dine. Stroll. above.
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NASCAR Hall of Fame
Conveniently located in Uptown Charlotte, North Carolina, the NASCAR Hall of Fame is an interactive entertainment attraction honoring the history and heritage of NASCAR. The high-tech venue, designed to educate and entertain race fans and non-fans alike, opened May 11, 2010, and includes artifacts, hands-on exhibits, a 278-person state-of-the-art theater, Hall of Honor, Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant, NASCAR Hall of Fame Gear Shop, NASCAR Productions-operated broadcast studio and an attached parking garage on Brevard Street. The 5-acre site also includes a privately developed 19-story office tower and 102,000-square-foot expansion to the Charlotte Convention Center, highlighted by a 40,000-square-foot ballroom. The NASCAR Hall of Fame is owned by the City of Charlotte, licensed by NASCAR and operated by the Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority. The goal of the facility is to honor NASCAR icons and create an enduring tribute to the drivers, crew members, team owners and others that have impacted the sport in the past, present and future.
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Hamilton Museum of Steam & Technology
Witness the social and mechanical life of Canada’s early industrial revolution. Housed in a 150-year-old Waterworks, this National Historic Site preserves two 70-ton steam powered water pumping engines, perhaps the oldest surviving Canadian-built engines. The historic Hamilton Waterworks is a Civil and Power Engineering Landmark. The museum offers guided tours, various permanent and changing exhibits, and features special events for the whole family
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Whitehern Historic House & Garden
Discover one of the finest examples of an intact historic home in Canada during a guided tour with a costumed interpreter. Three generations of the McQuesten family lived at Whitehern from 1852 until 1968. Among the last generation were six children who never married. In 1959 the three surviving members of the family bequeathed the home to the City with all its original contents. It contains elements from many time periods – Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian – dating up to 1939 when the Honourable Thomas McQuesten was Minister of Highways. Explore the heritage of Victorian ideas and possessions that influenced life at Whitehern on the eve of World War II.
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Art Gallery of Hamilton (AGH)
Founded in 1914 the Art Gallery of Hamilton is the oldest and largest art museum in southwestern Ontario with a permanent collection that is recognized as one of the finest in Canada. Embracing Canadian historical, international and contemporary art, the collection consists of more than 10,000 works. You can see superb pieces by Alex Colville, Tom Thomson, the Group of Seven, Emily Carr, James Tissot, Jean-Léon Gérôme, Gustave Doré, Norval Morrisseau, Keith Haring, Edward Burtynsky, Kim Adams, or Tyler Tekatch, to name a few. Whether you’re looking for a specific artist or spending time in one of our galleries, you’re sure to find works that inspire, intrigue, challenge and engage you. The AGH is renowned for presenting outstanding exhibitions and complementary programming for visitors of all ages. There is so much to see and do! In addition to AGH Tours and AGH Talks, the Gallery offers studios for adults and kids , family activities, school programs, film programming, performances and more.
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Dundurn National Historic Site
Experience a guided tour of this 40-room Italianate-style villa built in the 1830’s on Burlington Heights; the former site of a fortified military encampment established by the British in 1813. Once home to Sir Allan Napier MacNab, railway magnate, lawyer and Premier of the United Canadas (1854-1856) and his family, today Dundurn Castle tells the story of the family who lived above stairs and the servants who lived and worked below stairs to support their affluent lifestyle. Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall is the museum’s Patron and the great, great, great granddaughter of Sir Allan MacNab.
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CN Tower
The CN Tower is Toronto’s tallest and most defining landmark. Photos of Toronto are often defined by the building, which stretches more than 550 metres into the sky. Today, aside from serving as a hub for telecommunications across the city, the CN Tower has become a major tourist destination. Visitors can test their courage by walking across the glass floor 113 stories above the ground. The first of its kind in the world, the glass floor gives you that dare-to-walk-on-air experience, with only 2.5 inches of glass holding you 342 metres in the air. The glass floor is actually stronger than most commercial floors and has the strength to hold 38,556 kg (85,000 lbs) or 14 hippos! Or, if you dare, travel higher up the tower to the Sky Pod, another 33 storeys above ground. The latest features at the tour is EdgeWalk, the world’s highest full-circle, hands-free walk. Visitors are attached through safety rails and harnesses and walk along the Tower’s ledge, 116 storeys above ground, to experience breathtaking views of the city below. EdgeWalk is open from spring through until fall, and is closed for the winter. Get more details at the CN Tower’s EdgeWalk site.
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Distillery Historic District
Toronto’s newest centre for arts, culture, food and entertainment. This national historic site includes 44 heritage buildings and numerous brick-lined courtyards. Explore the district’s many restaurants, art galleries, artisan boutiques, specialty retail stores and more.
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Marble House
Marble House was built between 1888 and 1892 for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt. It was a summer house, or "cottage", as Newporters called them in remembrance of the modest houses of the early 19th century. But Marble House was much more; it was a social and architectural landmark that set the pace for Newport's subsequent transformation from a quiet summer colony of wooden houses to the legendary resort of opulent stone palaces. The house was designed by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The cost of the house was reported in contemporary press accounts to be $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. Upon its completion, Mr. Vanderbilt gave the house to his wife as a 39th birthday present. The Vanderbilts divorced in 1895 and Alva married Oliver H.P. Belmont, moving down the street to Belcourt. After his death, she reopened Marble House, and had a Chinese Tea House built on the seaside cliffs, where she hosted rallies for women's right to vote. She sold the house to Frederick H. Prince in 1932. The Preservation Society acquired the house in 1963 from the Prince estate. In 2006, Marble House was designated a National Historic Landmark.