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Dublin

Country: Ireland
Population:1,024,027
Time Zone:UTC1
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National Museum of Ireland-Decorative Arts & History
Collins Barracks in Dublin City could be said to be the National Museum of Ireland's largest artefact, having had a unique history all of its own in another life.
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Dublin Castle
Erected in the early thirteenth century on the site of a Viking settlement, Dublin Castle served for centuries as the headquarters of English, and later British, administration in Ireland. In 1922, following Ireland’s independence, Dublin Castle was handed over to the new Irish government.
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Dublin Christ Church Cathedral
Christ Church Cathedral is Dublin's oldest building, a leading visitor attraction and a place of pilgrimage for almost 1,000 years. Renowned for its beauty, architecture and exquisite floor tiles, it is home to the famous 12th Century crypt, one of the oldest and largest in Britain and Ireland. Perfectly located in the heart of Medieval Dublin, it was founded in 1030 by Sitriuc, King of the Dublin Norsemen and was incorporated into the Irish Church in 1152 and eventually led by the famous Archbishop and patron saint of Dublin, Laurence O’Toole. Over the years, Christ Church has borne witness to many significant events including the crowning of Lambert Simnel as Edward VI in 1487. Today, it houses the important Treasures of Christ Church which features manuscripts and ancient artifacts as well as a spectacular exhibition of original 16th Century costumes from the historical series 'The Tudors'. Designed by Emmy award winning designer Joan Bergin, the opulent costumes from the drama have travelled the world including a display in Macy’s New York.
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Phoenix Park
The Phoenix Park is the largest enclosed public park in any capital city in Europe. It was originally formed as a royal hunting Park in the 1660s and opened to the public in 1747. A large herd of fallow deer still remain to this day. The Park is also home to the Zoological Gardens, Áras an Uachtaráin, and Victorian flower gardens The Phoenix Park is only a mile and a half from O’Connell Street. Both passive and active recreational pursuits may be viewed or pursued such as walking, running, polo, cricket, hurling, and many more. The Glen Pond is set in very scenic surrounds in the Furry Glen. There are many walks and cycle trails available to the public.
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Guinness Storehouse
Guinness is synonymous with Ireland and no visit to Dublin is complete without a trip to the Guinness Storehouse – the Home of Guinness. Located in the heart of the legendary St. James’s Gate Brewery in Dublin, this production site has been home to the Guinness Brewery since 1759, when Arthur Guinness signed a lease for 9,000 years. The Guinness Storehouse building dates back to 1904 and is built in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture. It was once the fermentation plant of the brewery and is now a seven-storey visitor experience dedicated to the history of the making of this world famous beer. The Guinness Storehouse is the Home of Guinness, where you will discover what goes into the making of each and every pint, and learn about the incredible brand history stretching over 250 years.
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St Stephen's Green Park
St Stephen’s Green Park is a historical park and garden, located in the centre of Dublin city. Cared for by the Office of Public Works, the park is an important public resource in the area, and provides an oasis of green calm in the middle of a bustling city. Its four centuries of history are eventful and complex, involving such important figures as Arthur Guinness, 1st Baron Ardilaun, and Countess Constance Markievicz. The park itself hosts a large number of important sculptural monuments to Irish history. Many species of birds and plants also call the park their home. Public facilities at St Stephen’s Green Park include a playground and a garden for the visually impaired.
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Kilmainham Gaol
Kilmainham Gaol opened in 1796 as the new County Gaol for Dublin. It closed its doors in 1924. Today the building symbolises the tradition of militant and constitutional nationalism from the rebellion of 1798 to the Irish Civil War of 1922-23. Leaders of the rebellions of 1798, 1803, 1848,1867 and 1916 were detained and in some cases executed here. Many members of the Irish Republican movement during the Anglo-Irish War (1919-21) were also detained in Kilmainham Gaol, guarded by British troops. Names such as Henry Joy McCracken, Robert Emmet, Anne Devlin, Charles Stewart Parnell and the leaders of 1916 will always be associated with the building. It should not be forgotten however that, as a county gaol, Kilmainham held thousands of ordinary men, women and children. Their crimes ranged from petty offences such as stealing food to more serious crimes such as murder or rape. Convicts from many parts of Ireland were held here for long periods waiting to be transported to Australia. Kilmainham Gaol Museum is operated and managed by the Office of Public Works.
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Malahide Castle
Malahide Castle, set on 250 acres of park land in the pretty seaside town of Malahide,w as both a fortress and a private home for nearly 800 years and is an interesting mix of architectural styles. The Talbot family lived here from 1185 to 1973, when the last Talbot died. The house is furnished with beautiful period furniture together with an extensive collection of Irish portrait paintings, mainly from the National Gallery. The history of the Talbot family is recorded in the Great Hall, where portraits of generations of the family tell their own story of Ireland's stormy history. Many additions and alterations have been made to this romantic and beautiful structure, but the contours of the surrounding parklands have changed little in 800 years, retaining a sense of the past. A major feature of Malahide Castle Demesne is the beautiful Talbot Botanic Gardens. The gardens, as they exist today, were largely created by Lord Milo Talbot between 1948 and 1973.
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National Gallery of Ireland
Apart from the amazing art and exciting exhibitions, there are many more reasons to spend time at the National Gallery of Ireland! A visit to the National Gallery of Ireland is free. Since 1854, when it opened its doors for the first time, the National Gallery of Ireland has always believed that the National Collection is the nation’s collection and as such is available for your pleasure almost all year round.
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The Little Museum of Dublin
Discover the fascinating history of Dublin at the Little Museum of Dublin in the company of friendly experts. From the visit of Queen Victoria to the global success of U2, this handsome museum is full of amazing things to discover. From James Joyce to John F Kennedy, you will meet some fantastic characters on our famous guided tours. No wonder the critics agree: “The Little Museum is a brilliant new addition to the cultural map of Ireland's capital.” If you want to know all about Dublin, visit the Little Museum today.
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Bodowyr Burial Chamber
Standing on a hillock backed by panoramic views of Snowdonia, Bodowyr is a striking landmark. The massive, mushroom-shaped capstone was originally supported by four tall standing stones, one of which fell at some point over the last few millennia. A fifth, shorter stone is believed to mark what was once the tomb’s entrance. Originally covered in earth and built in Neolithic (New Stone Age) times it is most likely a passage grave used for communal burial. However, the site has never been excavated so exactly who or what is buried here remains a mystery.
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Castell Bryn Gwyn
Though all that remains of this Neolithic (New Stone Age) settlement is a single bank, excavations have revealed a site with a particularly long history. Its origins stretch back to a circular enclosure featuring a bank and external ditch built in the late Neolithic era or early Bronze Age. Originally thought to be a ceremonial henge monument, finds of pottery, post holes and flint and bronze tools are in fact those of a settlement. The locals must have liked the place. Castell Bryn Gwyn was used far beyond the Neolithic period, with archaeological finds suggesting it was still inhabited as late as 1st-century Roman times.
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Caer Leb
This rectilinear enclosure of double banks and ditches has a complex and sometimes murky history. Its location on low-lying marshland led some to believe that it may once have been a medieval moated homestead, while excavations have uncovered medieval coins and Roman artefacts dating from the 3rd century. However, it seems that these items were left by the settlement’s later occupants rather than its original builders, with investigations of similar sites elsewhere in Wales suggesting that Caer Lêb has Iron Age origins.
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Caernarfon Town Walls
Don’t overlook Caernarfon’s medieval town walls. Visitors flock here, of course, to see the world-famous fortress. But Caernarfon’s story is not complete without including a chapter on its ring of ancient walls. They were an essential part of King Edward I’s masterplan to create a complete fortress town settled by incomers. The circuit of walls, studded with eight towers and two gateways, survives almost complete. Extending for almost half-a-mile, the walls threw a security blanket around Edward’s new town. The East Gate was the main landward entrance to the medieval borough. This is matched, at the opposite end of the High Street, by the West (or Water) Gate, which could only be approached from the sea in the 13th century. Some of the best-preserved sections of wall can be seen just north of the East Gate, though to get a sense of the original atmosphere of the town take a walk on the quay or along the shady Hole in the Wall Street.
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Caernarfonn Castle
A brute of a fortress. Caernarfon Castle’s pumped-up appearance is unashamedly muscle-bound and intimidating.
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Segontium Roman Fort
Established nearly two millennia ago, this strategically-placed fort at the edge of the Roman Empire bustled with life for more than three hundred years. Segontium was founded by Agricola in AD77 after he brutally suppressed a rebellion by the native tribe known as the Ordovices. Designed to hold a 1,000-strong regiment of auxiliary infantrymen, it was linked by Roman roads to the main legionary bases at Chester and Caerleon. Thanks to excavated coins we know the Romans stayed until about AD394 – no other fort in Wales was held so long. Segontium not only controlled access to fertile and mineral-rich Anglesey but later helped defend the Welsh coast against Irish pirates.
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Bryn Celli Ddu Burial Chamber
One of Anglesey’s most famous prehistoric landmarks, Bryn Celli Ddu (the ‘Mound in the Dark Grove’ in English) is actually two sites in one. In the early Neolithic (New Stone Age) period, a henge (bank and ditch) enclosing a circle of stones was built here, to be replaced later by a chambered tomb beneath a mound measuring up to 85ft/26m in diameter. Inside, a long, narrow passage leads to an octagonal chamber 8ft/2.4m across, where artefacts such as human bones, arrowheads and carved stones have been found. But Bryn Celli Ddu’s most unusual feature can only be seen once a year. As the sun rises on the summer solstice (the longest day of the year) shafts of light shine directly down the tomb’s passageway to illuminate the chamber within.
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Gypsy Wood Park
Everyone in the family will love a day out at Gypsy Wood Park! We are one of North Wales’ top family attractions, and with a huge range of attractions and things to do for all the family, you’ll be sure of a fun-filled family day out. Come and meet our friendly animals, take a ride on Woody’s Train, try your hand at one of our family games, run wild in our outdoor play areas, make some music in our treehouse and see if you can spot all of our fairies on the fairy hunt and lots more, all set in 20 acres of beautiful natural Welsh woodland. And don’t forget to pack your wellies for the woodland walk and write up your wishes for the Fairy Princess. So why not come and make happy holiday memories with us here at Gypsy Wood Park?
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Sir Thomas and Lady Dixon Park
Sir Thomas and Lady Dixon Park in south Belfast is one of the city's most popular parks. The park is home to the City of Belfast International Rose Garden, which attracts thousands of visitors to Rose Week celebrations which take place in July each year. Covering more than 128 acres, the park is made up of rolling meadows, copses, woodland and gardens and is home to a wide range of plants and animals. An ideal base for exploring nearby Lagan Valley Regional Park, it contains international camellia trials, a walled garden, a Japanese-style garden with water features for quiet contemplation, children's playground and orienteering and eco trails. There is also a bottle bank, barbecue area, picnic tables and full car parking facilities.
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Belfast Botanic Gardens
Botanic Gardens is an important part of Belfast's Victorian heritage and a popular meeting place for residents, students and tourists. Botanic Gardens was established in 1828 by the Belfast Botanic and Horticultural Society, in response to the public interest in horticulture and botany. Originally known as the Belfast Botanic Garden, the site contained exotic tree species and impressive plant collections from the southern hemisphere, many of which can still be seen in the park. Today, the park is popular with residents, students and visitors and is an important venue for concerts, festivals and other events. It is home to the Palm House and the Tropical Ravine.
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Ulster Museum
Come face to face with dinosaurs, meet an ancient Egyptian mummy and see modern masterpieces with a visit to the Ulster Museum. As Northern Ireland's treasure house of the past and the present, the Ulster Museum is home to a rich collection of art, history and natural sciences and is free to all visitors. The museum tells the story of the people of the north of Ireland from earliest times to the present day. Impressive galleries and interactive discovery zones bring history, science and art collections to life for visitors of all ages. Enjoy a bite to eat in the cafe, then get face to face with dinosaurs and up close Takabuti, the famous ancient Egyptian mummy, who experts believe suffered a violent death by a knife attack. Learn about who she was and how she came to arrive in Belfast in 1834. The Ulster Museum is part of National Museums Northern Ireland, which also includes the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum, Ulster American Folk Park, the W5 Science Centre and Armagh County Museum. And best of all, admission is free.
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Mount Stewart House
Mount Stewart, located on the shores of Strangford Lough in County Down, is Northern Ireland’s much-loved family home. Following a three year £8 million restoration programme, this 19th- century house has been significantly transformed, making it a must-see attraction on the island of Ireland. Voted as one of the top ten gardens in the world, Mount Stewart reflects a rich tapestry of design and planting artistry bearing the hallmark of its creator. Edith, Lady Londonderry’s passion for bold planting schemes coupled with the mild climate of Strangford Lough allows rare and tender plants from across the globe to thrive in this celebrated garden. Each of the formal gardens exudes a distinct character and appeal. Mount Stewart is a delight for the senses with a series of formal themed garden compartments around the house including The Italian, Spanish, Mairi and Shamrock Garden.
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Belfast City Hall
One of Belfast's most iconic buildings, Belfast City Hall first opened its doors in August 1906 and is Belfast's civic building. Free public tours of Belfast City Hall are available. Led by an experienced guide, they last around one hour and uncover the history of Belfast City Hall, while exploring some of its finest features. You can also visit the Titanic Memorial Garden and a number of monuments and memorials in the grounds. Look out for the Belfast City Hall illuminations as they light up the building in a variety of colours and combinations at night, showing off the building's beautiful architectural features.
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Albert Clock
rected in 1865 in Gothic style to commemorate Queen Victoria’s consort, Prince Albert, the Albert Memorial Clock was built on reclaimed land from the River Lagan on wooden piles, causing the characteristic list.
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Belfast Cathedral
The building itself is Romanesque, giving it a lofty grandeur associated with that style; semi-circular arches and massive pillars, vast and high single windows, and possessing an uncluttered spaciousness. The Cathedral contains mosaics designed by Sir Charles Nicholson, as well as sculptures by Rosamund Praegar and Maurice Harding.
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Golden Thread Gallery
Golden Thread Gallery is Northern Ireland's leading international contemporary visual arts organisation. The gallery is actively committed to enhancing and widening the cultural experience for those living in, working in and visiting the region. Golden Thread Gallery prides itself on offering a friendly, open space where everyone is welcome. For those who have never visited the gallery before, why not pay a visit and get a taste of what's available? From its beginnings in a former linen mill on a contested ‘peace line' in North Belfast, Golden Thread Gallery has delivered annual programmes of exhibitions and activities designed to make a real contribution to the visual arts and wider communities in Northern Ireland. Golden Thread Gallery has developed a reputation for its engagement with recent histories and re-imagined futures. Golden Thread Gallery publishes and sells a wide variety of art books, periodicals and journals. Artworks are also available for sale through the gallery's dedicated sales area for all art lovers and collectors to enjoy. The gallery also offers a unique artistic encounter and is located on Great Patrick Street between Belfast's Cathedral Quarter and the historic Sailor Town area of the city.
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Scrabo Tower
At the top of Scrabo Hill, overlooking Strangford Lough and the whole of North Down, is Scrabo Tower. The tower, which was built in 1857, is one of Northern Ireland’s best known landmarks and the views from the top are spectacular.
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W5
W5 is Belfast’s award-winning science and discovery centre and provides a unique experience as well as fantastic fun for visitors of all ages. Visitors can immerse themselves in W5’s new technological space ‘AMAZE’, scale the heights on the multi-storey climbing structure ‘Climbit’, meet W5’s humanoid robot ‘Robothespian, plus so much more. In addition to permanent exhibits, W5 also presents a changing programme of temporary exhibitions and events. Visitors can also enjoy a daily programme of live science demonstrations and shows throughout the day. W5’s seasonal events are FREE with admission and tickets are valid all day.
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Crumlin Road Gaol
The Crumlin Road Gaol is a 19th century Grade A listed jail, open to the public for tours, concerts and events. Take a tour to experience all aspects of the Gaol from the tunnel linking the courthouse on the other side of the Crumlin Road to the hanging cell, Governor's office, hospital and graveyard. Crumlin Road Gaol first opened its gates to prisoners in 1846 and for 150 years was a fully operational prison. On March 31, 1996, the Governor of Belfast's Crumlin Road Gaol walked out of the fortified prison and the heavy air-lock gates slammed shut for the final time. During those 150 years, the Gaol has housed murderers, suffragettes and loyalist and republican prisoners. It has witnessed births, deaths and marriages and has been the home to executions, escapes, hunger-strikes and riots.
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Titanic Belfast
Titanic Belfast is the world's largest Titanic visitor experience and a must-see on any visit to Belfast and Northern Ireland. Titanic Belfast, named the World's Leading Tourist Attraction at the prestigious World Travel Awards in 2016, is located beside the Titanic Slipways, the Harland and Wolff Drawing Offices and Hamilton Graving Dock, the very place where Titanic was designed, built and launched in 1912. Titanic Belfast tells the story of the Titanic, from her conception in Belfast in the early 1900s, through her construction and launch, to its maiden voyage and subsequent place in history. The self-guided Titanic Experience extends over nine interpretive and interactive galleries, which explore the sights, sounds, smells and stories of RMS Titanic, as well as the city and people who made her.
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Dolbadarn Castle
Welsh castle and solitary guardian of Snowdonia’s Llanberis Pass Occupying a lofty, lonely spot overlooking the waters of Llyn Padarn, native-built Dolbadarn Castle was once a vital link in the defences of the ancient kingdom of Gwynedd. Most likely constructed by Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (Llywelyn the Great) in the late 12th or early 13th century, it stood to watch over the strategic route inland from Caernarfon to the upper Conwy Valley. Today the site is dominated by the sturdy round tower, very different in style to the unmortared slate slabs which make up the castle’s curtain walls. Standing 50ft/15.2m high, the tower’s design was probably inspired by that of similar fortresses built by Llywelyn’s rivals in the borderlands of the Southern Marches.
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Movilla Abbey
As with many early monasteries, it was refounded as an Augustinian abbey in the Norman 12th century. It possesses the best collection of 13th Century coffin lids with foliate lids, in the Province.
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Belfast Castle Estate
Belfast Castle is located in the Cave Hill area of north Belfast. It was built in the 1860s and is one of the city's most famous landmarks. For generations, Cave Hill has been synonymous with Belfast, with its imposing outline visible throughout the city. The landmark, named for the five caves located on the side of the cliffs, contains a wealth of natural, archaeological and historical features, including Belfast Castle. Its most famous feature, known locally as Napoleon's Nose, is believed to have been the inspiration for Jonathan Swift's novel, Gulliver's Travels. The park is home to the Cave Hill Adventurous Playground, archaeological sites, Visitor Information Area in Belfast Castle, eco trails, walking and orienteering routes. The estate contains landscaped gardens and mature mixed woodland and offers superb views of the city from a variety of vantage points. It is home to many different species of wildlife, including long-eared owls, sparrowhawks and Belfast's rarest plant; the town hall clock.
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Welsh Highland Railway- Rheilffordd Eryri
Take a 12-mile ride, from the coast to the slopes of Snowdon, on North Wales' newest railway. Enjoy the spectacular scenery while our massive locomotives take you past lakes, mountains and forest as they twist and turn on their way to the very heart of Snowdonia itself.
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Belfast Zoo
Belfast Zoological Gardens is home to more than 140 species of animal, many of which are in danger in their natural habitat. As one of the oldest visitor attractions in Northern Ireland, many visitors have fond memories of visiting the gardens, which have been home to the animals since 1934. Belfast Zoo is now a leading and award-winning visitor attraction in Northern Ireland, with more than 200,000 visitors each year. Popular attractions include the Asian elephants, Barbary lions, Rothschild's giraffes, California sea lions, penguins, apes, Malayan tapirs, giant anteater, Malayan sun bears, Visayan warty pigs, Goodfellow's tree kangaroo, red-backed bearded sakis, crowned sifaka, ring-tailed lemurs and reptiles.
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Ballycopeland Windmill
Late 18th-century tower mill in use until 1915 and still in working order. Ballycopeland Windmill is the only remaining working windmill in East Down. It was built in the late 18th or early 19th century and was worked until the First World War when it fell into disrepair. It was gradually restored between 1950 and 1978 to full working order. A small visitor centre is located inside the Millers house. Disabled access is not possible within the windmill. This is a group of traditional buildings on a sloping site with changes of level. Wheelchair users can gain access to the exhibition but may find this difficult. Some parts of the complex are inaccessible for wheelchairs.
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Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
Explore thatched cottages, farms, schools and shops as you experience life from over 100 years ago. Set in over 170 acres of rolling countryside overlooking Belfast Lough, chat to a costumed visitor guide, admire traditional crafts and meet farm animals.
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Bangor Castle
This impressive building was built for the Hon Robert Edward Ward and his family in 1852. The building is situated in the grounds of Castle Park alongside the North Down Museum and is just a short walk from Bangor Castle Walled Garden.
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Antrim Castle Gardens and Clotworthy House
The gardens are a complex living museum containing over four centuries of culture and heritage. Within the heart of the 60 acre gardens is a unique visitor experience, Clotworthy House.
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The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park
The Pembrokeshire coast is wild, gorgeous and beautifully looked after. For family activity holidays, it’s a nature lab one minute and an adventure playground the next. It’s heaven for wildlife-watching, watersports and walking, and lovely for romantic escapes, too. When you’re ready to chill out after all that fresh air, there are cosy pubs, spa treatments and fabulous sunsets to enjoy.
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Haverfordwest Castle
Haverfordwest Castle dominates the small riverside town of Haverfordwest. The wife of Edward 1 (Queen Eleanor) acquired the castle in 1289 and extended it on a large scale, but it was derelict by the 16th century. During the Civil War it was refortified and was occupied successively by Royalists and Parliamentarians, changing hands four times. Part of the castle was converted to a prison in the 18th century. This building now houses the County Archives.
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Haverfordwest Town Museum
The museum of the county town is located in the Governors House, within the walls of Haverfordwest Castle. It contains an informative local history exhibition as well as a collection of paintings in the museum gallery and an exhibition of artefacts discovered at Haverfordwest Priory.
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Haverfordwest Priory
Haverfordwest Priory was founded in 1200 on land donated by Robert Fitzancard, the Lord of Haverfordwest. Like many of the buildings from this era it was dissolved by Henry 8th and after passing through many owners is now under the care of Cadw. Recent excavations of the site have uncovered Britain’s only surviving ecclesiastical garden from the medieval period.