active-pinPinned places
active-placeAdd a New Place
active-pinPinned places
active-placeAdd a New Place

Architecture in Dublin

unpinned
Kilmainham Gaol
Kilmainham Gaol opened in 1796 as the new County Gaol for Dublin. It closed its doors in 1924. Today the building symbolises the tradition of militant and constitutional nationalism from the rebellion of 1798 to the Irish Civil War of 1922-23. Leaders of the rebellions of 1798, 1803, 1848,1867 and 1916 were detained and in some cases executed here. Many members of the Irish Republican movement during the Anglo-Irish War (1919-21) were also detained in Kilmainham Gaol, guarded by British troops. Names such as Henry Joy McCracken, Robert Emmet, Anne Devlin, Charles Stewart Parnell and the leaders of 1916 will always be associated with the building. It should not be forgotten however that, as a county gaol, Kilmainham held thousands of ordinary men, women and children. Their crimes ranged from petty offences such as stealing food to more serious crimes such as murder or rape. Convicts from many parts of Ireland were held here for long periods waiting to be transported to Australia. Kilmainham Gaol Museum is operated and managed by the Office of Public Works.
unpinned
Malahide Castle
Malahide Castle, set on 250 acres of park land in the pretty seaside town of Malahide,w as both a fortress and a private home for nearly 800 years and is an interesting mix of architectural styles. The Talbot family lived here from 1185 to 1973, when the last Talbot died. The house is furnished with beautiful period furniture together with an extensive collection of Irish portrait paintings, mainly from the National Gallery. The history of the Talbot family is recorded in the Great Hall, where portraits of generations of the family tell their own story of Ireland's stormy history. Many additions and alterations have been made to this romantic and beautiful structure, but the contours of the surrounding parklands have changed little in 800 years, retaining a sense of the past. A major feature of Malahide Castle Demesne is the beautiful Talbot Botanic Gardens. The gardens, as they exist today, were largely created by Lord Milo Talbot between 1948 and 1973.
unpinned
Dublin Christ Church Cathedral
Christ Church Cathedral is Dublin's oldest building, a leading visitor attraction and a place of pilgrimage for almost 1,000 years. Renowned for its beauty, architecture and exquisite floor tiles, it is home to the famous 12th Century crypt, one of the oldest and largest in Britain and Ireland. Perfectly located in the heart of Medieval Dublin, it was founded in 1030 by Sitriuc, King of the Dublin Norsemen and was incorporated into the Irish Church in 1152 and eventually led by the famous Archbishop and patron saint of Dublin, Laurence O’Toole. Over the years, Christ Church has borne witness to many significant events including the crowning of Lambert Simnel as Edward VI in 1487. Today, it houses the important Treasures of Christ Church which features manuscripts and ancient artifacts as well as a spectacular exhibition of original 16th Century costumes from the historical series 'The Tudors'. Designed by Emmy award winning designer Joan Bergin, the opulent costumes from the drama have travelled the world including a display in Macy’s New York.
unpinned
Dublin Castle
Erected in the early thirteenth century on the site of a Viking settlement, Dublin Castle served for centuries as the headquarters of English, and later British, administration in Ireland. In 1922, following Ireland’s independence, Dublin Castle was handed over to the new Irish government.
unpinned
National Museum of Ireland-Decorative Arts & History
Collins Barracks in Dublin City could be said to be the National Museum of Ireland's largest artefact, having had a unique history all of its own in another life.
Have we missed one?
You can add a new place,
sight, landmark, attraction,
things to see
Add a Place
Explore more places related to this search:
unpinned
Caernarfon Town Walls
Don’t overlook Caernarfon’s medieval town walls. Visitors flock here, of course, to see the world-famous fortress. But Caernarfon’s story is not complete without including a chapter on its ring of ancient walls. They were an essential part of King Edward I’s masterplan to create a complete fortress town settled by incomers. The circuit of walls, studded with eight towers and two gateways, survives almost complete. Extending for almost half-a-mile, the walls threw a security blanket around Edward’s new town. The East Gate was the main landward entrance to the medieval borough. This is matched, at the opposite end of the High Street, by the West (or Water) Gate, which could only be approached from the sea in the 13th century. Some of the best-preserved sections of wall can be seen just north of the East Gate, though to get a sense of the original atmosphere of the town take a walk on the quay or along the shady Hole in the Wall Street.
unpinned
Caernarfonn Castle
A brute of a fortress. Caernarfon Castle’s pumped-up appearance is unashamedly muscle-bound and intimidating.
unpinned
Ulster Museum
Come face to face with dinosaurs, meet an ancient Egyptian mummy and see modern masterpieces with a visit to the Ulster Museum. As Northern Ireland's treasure house of the past and the present, the Ulster Museum is home to a rich collection of art, history and natural sciences and is free to all visitors. The museum tells the story of the people of the north of Ireland from earliest times to the present day. Impressive galleries and interactive discovery zones bring history, science and art collections to life for visitors of all ages. Enjoy a bite to eat in the cafe, then get face to face with dinosaurs and up close Takabuti, the famous ancient Egyptian mummy, who experts believe suffered a violent death by a knife attack. Learn about who she was and how she came to arrive in Belfast in 1834. The Ulster Museum is part of National Museums Northern Ireland, which also includes the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum, Ulster American Folk Park, the W5 Science Centre and Armagh County Museum. And best of all, admission is free.
unpinned
Mount Stewart House
Mount Stewart, located on the shores of Strangford Lough in County Down, is Northern Ireland’s much-loved family home. Following a three year £8 million restoration programme, this 19th- century house has been significantly transformed, making it a must-see attraction on the island of Ireland. Voted as one of the top ten gardens in the world, Mount Stewart reflects a rich tapestry of design and planting artistry bearing the hallmark of its creator. Edith, Lady Londonderry’s passion for bold planting schemes coupled with the mild climate of Strangford Lough allows rare and tender plants from across the globe to thrive in this celebrated garden. Each of the formal gardens exudes a distinct character and appeal. Mount Stewart is a delight for the senses with a series of formal themed garden compartments around the house including The Italian, Spanish, Mairi and Shamrock Garden.
unpinned
Belfast City Hall
One of Belfast's most iconic buildings, Belfast City Hall first opened its doors in August 1906 and is Belfast's civic building. Free public tours of Belfast City Hall are available. Led by an experienced guide, they last around one hour and uncover the history of Belfast City Hall, while exploring some of its finest features. You can also visit the Titanic Memorial Garden and a number of monuments and memorials in the grounds. Look out for the Belfast City Hall illuminations as they light up the building in a variety of colours and combinations at night, showing off the building's beautiful architectural features.
unpinned
Albert Clock
rected in 1865 in Gothic style to commemorate Queen Victoria’s consort, Prince Albert, the Albert Memorial Clock was built on reclaimed land from the River Lagan on wooden piles, causing the characteristic list.
unpinned
Belfast Cathedral
The building itself is Romanesque, giving it a lofty grandeur associated with that style; semi-circular arches and massive pillars, vast and high single windows, and possessing an uncluttered spaciousness. The Cathedral contains mosaics designed by Sir Charles Nicholson, as well as sculptures by Rosamund Praegar and Maurice Harding.
unpinned
Scrabo Tower
At the top of Scrabo Hill, overlooking Strangford Lough and the whole of North Down, is Scrabo Tower. The tower, which was built in 1857, is one of Northern Ireland’s best known landmarks and the views from the top are spectacular.
unpinned
Titanic Belfast
Titanic Belfast is the world's largest Titanic visitor experience and a must-see on any visit to Belfast and Northern Ireland. Titanic Belfast, named the World's Leading Tourist Attraction at the prestigious World Travel Awards in 2016, is located beside the Titanic Slipways, the Harland and Wolff Drawing Offices and Hamilton Graving Dock, the very place where Titanic was designed, built and launched in 1912. Titanic Belfast tells the story of the Titanic, from her conception in Belfast in the early 1900s, through her construction and launch, to its maiden voyage and subsequent place in history. The self-guided Titanic Experience extends over nine interpretive and interactive galleries, which explore the sights, sounds, smells and stories of RMS Titanic, as well as the city and people who made her.
unpinned
Dolbadarn Castle
Welsh castle and solitary guardian of Snowdonia’s Llanberis Pass Occupying a lofty, lonely spot overlooking the waters of Llyn Padarn, native-built Dolbadarn Castle was once a vital link in the defences of the ancient kingdom of Gwynedd. Most likely constructed by Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (Llywelyn the Great) in the late 12th or early 13th century, it stood to watch over the strategic route inland from Caernarfon to the upper Conwy Valley. Today the site is dominated by the sturdy round tower, very different in style to the unmortared slate slabs which make up the castle’s curtain walls. Standing 50ft/15.2m high, the tower’s design was probably inspired by that of similar fortresses built by Llywelyn’s rivals in the borderlands of the Southern Marches.
unpinned
Movilla Abbey
As with many early monasteries, it was refounded as an Augustinian abbey in the Norman 12th century. It possesses the best collection of 13th Century coffin lids with foliate lids, in the Province.
unpinned
Belfast Castle Estate
Belfast Castle is located in the Cave Hill area of north Belfast. It was built in the 1860s and is one of the city's most famous landmarks. For generations, Cave Hill has been synonymous with Belfast, with its imposing outline visible throughout the city. The landmark, named for the five caves located on the side of the cliffs, contains a wealth of natural, archaeological and historical features, including Belfast Castle. Its most famous feature, known locally as Napoleon's Nose, is believed to have been the inspiration for Jonathan Swift's novel, Gulliver's Travels. The park is home to the Cave Hill Adventurous Playground, archaeological sites, Visitor Information Area in Belfast Castle, eco trails, walking and orienteering routes. The estate contains landscaped gardens and mature mixed woodland and offers superb views of the city from a variety of vantage points. It is home to many different species of wildlife, including long-eared owls, sparrowhawks and Belfast's rarest plant; the town hall clock.
unpinned
Bangor Castle
This impressive building was built for the Hon Robert Edward Ward and his family in 1852. The building is situated in the grounds of Castle Park alongside the North Down Museum and is just a short walk from Bangor Castle Walled Garden.
unpinned
Antrim Castle Gardens and Clotworthy House
The gardens are a complex living museum containing over four centuries of culture and heritage. Within the heart of the 60 acre gardens is a unique visitor experience, Clotworthy House.
unpinned
Haverfordwest Town Museum
The museum of the county town is located in the Governors House, within the walls of Haverfordwest Castle. It contains an informative local history exhibition as well as a collection of paintings in the museum gallery and an exhibition of artefacts discovered at Haverfordwest Priory.
unpinned
Picton Castle
Perhaps the most spectacular Castle in the area is Picton. The original castle was probably built during the 12th century and over the years has been extended and altered into the building we see today, a half fortified manor house and half fully developed medieval castle. Besides the actual castle visitors can visit the gallery along with the extensive gardens and restaurant.
unpinned
Royal Albert Dock
With the iconic Royal Albert Dock Liverpool being one of the prime locations to visit during a visit to Liverpool, visitors can take advantage of the impressive retail and leisure offering at the Dock, world class museums and attractions and some of the city’s finest independents. Visitors to Tate Liverpool will find British and international modern and contemporary art, activities for families as well as a Tate café and shop. Uncover objects from the Titanic, find out about life at sea and learn about the port of Liverpool at Merseyside Maritime Museum. The International Slavery Museum tells the untold stories of enslaved people and learn about historical and contemporary slavery. At the award-winning The Beatles Story, the world's largest permanent exhibition purely devoted to the lives and times of The Beatles, visitors can find everything they need to know about four lads from Liverpool who shook the world.
unpinned
Liverpool Cathedral
Liverpool Anglican Cathedral is Britain's biggest Cathedral and the 5th largest in Europe. The cathedral is free to enter, however the tower and audio tour is highly recommended.
unpinned
Blackpool Tower
The Blackpool Tower is a true British institution. It is the iconic feature of Blackpool’s famous seafront and continues to bring as much joy to visitors as it did when it was first constructed in 1894. Few attractions prove that #BlackpoolHasItAll quite like The Blackpool Tower, with stunning attractions for all the family to enjoy. Best of all, with amazing deals like our Blackpool Resort Pass and special midweek offers for mothers and toddlers, enjoying the perfect day out has never been more affordable. For a truly spectacular view of Blackpool, you need to head to the top of the tower. At 518ft tall, you’ll be pleased to know that there are lifts to the summit, where superb panoramic views await. Here, you can gaze out at the beautiful Irish Sea and get a unique bird’s-eye view of Blackpool itself, while on clear days you can see as far as North Wales, the Lake District and the Isle of Man. The brave amongst you can also try out the glass floor, where you can peek straight down to the streets below.
unpinned
Blackpool Grand Theatre
When you enter the Victorian auditorium of the Blackpool Grand Theatre you will understand what people mean by ‘the glorious Grand’. There’s the incredibly ornate, gilded plasterwork, baroque ceiling, cavorting cherubs, cantilevered balconies allowing every seat a clear view of the stage and elegant new seats all creating a real ‘wow’ factor. Blackpool Grand Theatre is one of the few remaining theatres of great architectural character, designed by Frank Matcham. It has a magnificent 4-level auditorium with 1,100 seats. An all-year-round programme covering all live art forms. At Blackpool Grand Theatre, Lancashire's premier touring theatre and arts centre you will catch a wide-ranging programme of shows throughout the year.
unpinned
Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King
No trip to Liverpool is complete without a visit to the awe-inspiring Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. This dramatic icon of faith, architecture and human endeavour is spectacular in both scale and design. Explore the Cathedral's majestic interior which includes modern works of art and stunning design features, such as its striking Lantern Tower - the world’s largest area of coloured glass. Along with daily Masses and Services, the Cathedral runs a diverse programme of wonderful music concerts, exhibitions and special events.
unpinned
St Chad's Church
St Chad's Church, Shrewsbury occupies a prominent position in the county town of Shropshire. The current church building was built in 1792, and with its distinctive round shape and high tower, it is a well-known landmark in the town. It faces The Quarry area of parkland, which slopes down to the River Severn. The church is a Grade I listed building. The motto of the church is "open doors, open hearts, and open minds". This indicates the aspiration of the church to be a welcoming church, involved in the community, and on a collective journey seeking after God.
unpinned
Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery
Re-opened at the old Music Hall in April 2014, Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery tells the stories that make Shropshire unique through its’ amazing galleries: Roman Gallery, Shropshire Gallery, Medieval, Tudor and Stuart Galleries and the Special Exhibition Gallery. Come and explore millions of years of history through over one thousand remarkable objects in the extraordinary set of building that house Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery. From key Shropshire finds like the Roman tombstones and headstones and the Shropshire Mammoth to a fine geology and Tudor collection, Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery intimately depicts local history using all senses. Since opening, Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery has established itself as the perfect family museum and holds events and activities throughout the week that are ideal for children. Children and their families can take part in great activities like Mini-Mammoths to following the trail of Maximo Mouse through the museum – there’s always something in this family Museum for children to have fun and learn.
unpinned
St Alkmund's Church
St Alkmund’s is the only remaining open Anglican Church in the historic heart of Shrewsbury. St. Alkmund’s Church was founded in the 10th century, possibly by Aethefleda, daughter of King Alfred. She claimed descent from Alkmund, a Northumbrian prince murdered circ AD 800 near Derby.
unpinned
Shrewsbury Castle
The castle stands at the top of a hill and was built as a defensive fortification for Shrewsbury, which was otherwise protected by the River Severn. Founded by Roger de Montgomery in 1074, the castle has undergone many transformations, the last one being by Thomas Telford who 'modernised' the building in the 18th century. Climb the walls of the castle for amazing views and some people watching from high above the town. The grounds are free to visit and perfect for picnics too. The Castle houses the spectacular collections of the Shropshire Regimental Museum Trust including pictures, uniforms, medals, weapons and other equipment from the 18th Century to the present day. One of the prize exhibits is the baton of the German Admiral Doenitz, captured by soldiers of the King's Shropshire Light Infantry at the very end of World War II. Doenitz had been nominated as Hitler's successor. There are also stories about the British burning down the White House in 1814. The displays include a brief history of the castle through the centuries.
unpinned
Swansea Grand Theatre
Since 1897 to the present day, Swansea's Grand Theatre has been providing the public with a broad range of cultural, artistic and general entertainment events. The Grand Theatre was designed by the architect William Hope of Newcastle in 1897. It was built by D. Jenkins and was opened by Madam Adelina Patti - an Opera Diva of her day - under the original proprietors Morell and Mouillot. The Swansea Corporation leased the building in May 1969 and bought it outright in 1979. The Theatre was then refurbished and updated during the period 1983 - 1987 at a cost of £6.5m. A further £1m was spent for the Arts Wing to open its doors for the first time in 1999. Over the last twenty years, the fabric of 'The Grand' has been improved and enhanced considerably, thanks to the support of the former Swansea Corporation, Swansea City Council and more recently the City and County of Swansea. However, none of the theatre's unique identity has suffered as a result of this improvement and today's Grand is as full of charm and atmosphere as was the case when the theatre first opened its doors all those years ago.
unpinned
Dylan Thomas Centre
The Dylan Thomas Centre in Swansea is the focal point for exhibitions, studies and events on Dylan Thomas. The Centre is home to a permanent exhibition, ‘Love the Words’, which opened on 27 October 2014, Dylan’s 100th birthday. The interactive displays tell the story of the work, life and cultural context of one of the twentieth century’s most significant writers, and the exhibition includes a learning space, activities for children, and a temporary exhibition area. The Dylan Thomas Centre also runs a learning, outreach, and events programme. Guided tours of the exhibition at the Dylan Thomas Centre can be arranged for groups of all ages.
unpinned
National Waterfront Museum
At the National Waterfront Museum take in the sights and sounds of more than 300 years of Welsh industry and innovation. Using cutting-edge interactive technology, the Museum puts you in charge of the experience putting the past right at your fingertips. Located on the quayside of Swansea Marina - originally the South Dock of 1859 - the Museum stands in the former commercial heart of one of Wales's foremost industrial towns. Copper sheets made in Swansea once sheathed the hulls of the Royal Navy - to this day the term copper-bottomed implies quality and reliability! 15 themed galleries each tell a different aspect of this crucial period in Welsh history using a mix of touch screen technology and real objects, enabling visitors to be in charge of tracing their own experience of the fascinating - and still evolving - story of industrial Wales.
unpinned
Dunham Massey Hall
A house filled with treasures and stories, an ancient deer park and a garden for all seasons. Dunham's Lost Years: a Victorian Tale of Love and Abandonment. See the House transformed to revisit its Victorian past. Meet the 7th Earl and his new wife, skilled circus performer Catharine Cox. See their story of love, status and scandal played out throughout the House and discover how they altered the course of Dunham's history forever. The plantsman's garden, one of the finest in the North West, is a tranquil oasis with something to delight in all seasons. The herd of fallow deer wander amongst the tree-lined avenues in the ancient Deer Park. The Park is also home to the fully restored 400-year-old working sawmill powered by overshot water.
unpinned
IWM North
IWM North is part of Imperial War Museums – the world’s leading museum of war. Its unique purpose-built exhibition space gives powerful voice to the extraordinary experiences of ordinary people forced to live their lives in a world torn apart by conflict. Walkthrough a timeline of history from the First World War to the present day. Explore a vast collection of over 2,000 objects, each one with the power to move, surprise and inspire – from the First World War field gun that fired the opening British round on the Western Front, to the twisted rust-ridden steelwork retrieved from the rubble of the World Trade Center in New York. And immerse yourself in the award-winning 360-degree cinematic Big Picture Shows that bring a broad range of perspectives into poignant focus, reflecting not only on the immediate effects of war but also on what happens when the guns stop firing. This is a place where every object on display, every contemporary work of art and every special exhibition is designed to live long in the memory. This is IWM North.
unpinned
Ordsall Hall
Ordsall Hall is Salford's 'hidden gem'! Dating back over 600 years, it is one of the region's finest examples of an Elizabethan black and white half-timbered manor-house. Wander back through time soaking up the atmosphere of our fully-furnished Great Hall and Star Chamber Bedroom. Get the low-down on Tudor lifestyles; maybe reminisce in our Victorian showcase and kitchen; or unearth the wealth of new discoveries to be made in our exciting and informative family events and exhibitions programme. It's all happening at Ordsall Hall!
unpinned
People's History Museum
People’s History Museum (PHM) is the national museum of democracy, telling the story of its development in Britain: past, present, and future. The museum provides opportunities for all people to learn about, be inspired by and get involved in ideas worth fighting for; ideas such as equality, social justice, co-operation, and a fair world for all. 2020 will mark the tenth birthday of PHM being in its home on the bank of the River Irwell in city-centre Manchester; a site that combines a restored historic building and magnificent contemporary extension. It is from this location, with two permanent galleries, a state of the art conservation studio, a changing exhibition gallery, archive and study centre and extensive learning and community spaces, that the national museum of democracy invites people to discover over 200 years of ideas worth fighting for.
unpinned
The John Rylands Library
For those who set eyes on Deansgate's The John Rylands Library for the first time, 'library' might not be the first word that comes to mind. This masterpiece of Victorian Gothic architecture looks more like a castle or cathedral.