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Boston

Population:571,281
Time Zone:UTC-4
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Museum of African American History
The Museum of African American History is New England’s largest museum dedicated to preserving, conserving and interpreting the contributions of African Americans. In Boston and Nantucket, the Museum has preserved four historic sites and two Black Heritage Trails® that tell the story of organized black communities from the Colonial Period through the 19th century.
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Fenway Park
Fans of America's favorite pastime won't want to miss a game at Fenway Park. Home to the Boston Red Sox, this stadium has been the site of home runs, stolen bases and grounders since 1912.
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Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Over 70 retailers and 40 office tenants occupy the 200,000 square feet of retail and 160,000 square feet of space on Boston’s iconic mixed use festival marketplace. Customers enjoy unique, locally loved, and nationally recognized shops while indulging in the worldwide cuisine at our restaurants, pubs, and in the world-famous Quincy Market Colonnade. The cobblestone promenades are filled with the music and jaw-dropping routines of world-renowned street performers and musicians. Faneuil Hall Marketplace is at the top of the list of things to see in Boston!
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Freedom Trail
The famous Freedom Trail is a 2.5 mile red-brick trail through Boston’s historic neighborhoods that tells the story of the American Revolution. From the Old North Church to Faneuil Hall, and through resonant burying grounds, visit the temples and landmarks of the Revolutionary Era.
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Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
After Isabella Stewart Gardner's husband died in 1898, the art enthusiast bought land in Boston's Fenway area to open a museum to display her impressive collection of Italian art. The museum, which was fashioned after the Palazzo Barbaro in Venice, was completed in 1902, at which point Gardner moved in to the fourth floor and began installing her collection.
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New England Aquarium
The New England Aquarium in Boston is located right on Boston's scenic waterfront. Colorful & educational exhibits feature more than 8,000 aquatic creatures, including the playful penguin pool. A unique central tank as the main attraction complete with small sharks, many varieties of fish and a huge sea turtle. The Trust Family Foundation Shark and Ray Touch Tank features sharks and rays in a 25,000-gallon tank surrounded by shallow edges and viewing windows, allowing visitors to experience a close encounter with these animals. This beautiful space replicates a large mangrove area. The rays glide around the tank where visitors have the opportunity to reach right in and touch these graceful creatures. The Aquarium also runs a Whale Watch in Boston Harbor from April through October. Their high-speed catamaran takes participants to Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary - the only whale feeding sanctuary in the United States!
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Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)
The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston is one of the world's great art museums with masterpieces from around the world and across the ages, including more Monets than any museum outside of Paris, an unrivaled Japanese art collection, treasures from Egypt and the ancient world, and American art from colonial to modern times. At every turn, travel to a time and a place that will inform, enlighten, and inspire. Now open is the spectacular Art of the Americas Wing. Paintings, sculpture, furniture, works on paper, textiles, and decorative arts tell the story of the art of the Americas from the prehistoric times to the present day. More than 5000 glorious examples of art produced in North, Central, and South America are displayed—some for the first time.
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Boston Public Garden
The Boston Public Garden is one of the most popular tourist attractions in downtown Boston, for more reasons than just offering free admission to the public. It is a family and couple friendly park that allows visitors to absorb the rich history in one of America's first great cities. Located in the heart of Boston, the Public Garden is an ideal tranquil getaway from the surrounding hustle and bustle of the busy downtown streets. There are dozens of restaurants surrounding the park which offer great take out options for enjoyable picnics. Built in 1837 as the first botanical garden open to the public in the United States, the Boston Public Garden has gradually been filled with several statues commemorating the city's and nation's history. Of course, carefully selected trees such as weeping willows and Elms have been added to beautify the park. Erected in 1869, the bronze equestrian statue of George Washington dominates the western side of the park, allowing visitors to sit on benches on open space lawns and reflect. The walkways of the Public Garden are lined up with other statues such as of Boston politician Charles Sumner and the Ether monument. The focal point of the park is the small pond, which can be crossed over on a pedestrian bridge. The Swan boat rides on the pond, which have been offered since the 19th century, have become trademark activities of Boston. For a small fee, visitors can ride along floating swans, which make the Public Garden their seasonal home in spring and summer.
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Harpoon Brewery
Our beer hall is a premier Boston venue overlooking our brewery production and the city skyline. We can host evening events for up to 400 guests and have a unique, semi-private daytime event space for up to 70 guests. Our space is a great option for corporate, social, alumni events, fundraisers and private parties with catering and brewery tours available.
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Boston Children's Museum
For 100 years, Boston Children's Museum has been a leader in Boston and within the museum community worldwide. The Museum is a private, non-profit, educational institution that is recognized internationally as a research and development center and pacesetter for children's exhibitions, educational programs and curriculum. Designed for children and families, our exhibits focus on science, culture, environmental awareness, health & fitness, and the arts. In addition to extensive child-centered exhibits, Museum educators develop programs and activities that address literacy, performing arts, science and math, visual arts, cultures, and health and wellness. The Museum is also one of the few children's museums in the world to maintain a collection, with more than 50,000 items.
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Adams National Historical Park
Adams National Historical Park, Quincy, MA, is comprised of the birthplace homes of Presidents John and John Quincy Adams; the Old House, home to four generations of the Adams family; and the Stone Library. Many park programs and special events are offered to give kids of all ages an opportunity to Picture Themselves in the Past and see themselves in their nation's future. Contact the park for dates and details.
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Legoland Discovery Center Boston
LEGOLAND Discovery Center Boston is a new, indoor attraction, for children between 3 to 10 years old and their families. The interactive experience includes rides, a 4D cinema, Master Model Builder workshops and more! You can also see iconic attractions from Boston and surrounding areas in MINILAND. While all adults must be accompanied by a child, there are Adult Nights every month.
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Boston Fire Museum
The mission of the Museum is to preserve and display fire fighting memorabilia from the Greater Boston area, educate and inform the general public on fire safety, maintain our home in the historic Congress Street Fire Station, and to support the fire service in general. The Boston Fire Museum has occupied the old firehouse at 344 Congress St in Boston’s seaport district since 1983. The Museum Committee, which oversees the operation of the Museum, is an all-volunteer group dedicated to informing friends and visitors about the history of fire fighting. Since the Boston Fire Department is one of the oldest in the nation, there is a rich tradition to salute. The home of our parent group, the Boston Sparks Association, is on the second floor. Our museum collection comprises fire alarm displays and artefacts, firefighting equipment, antique fire apparatus, and photographs.
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Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum
At the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum, you can be a part of the famous event that forever changed the course of American history through a multi-sensory experience that includes live actors, interactive exhibits, and full-scale replica 18th-century sailing vessels! Enter the Meeting House and step back in time to rebellious 1773 Boston and meet Samuel Adams and your 18th century host! Discover what role you will play in the “single most important event leading up to the American Revolution” – the Boston Tea Party – as you take part in the colonial town meeting. Experience life at sea aboard an 18th-century sailing vessel as you join a Son of Liberty and take part in the “Destruction of the Tea”! Throw tea into the very same body of water where the Boston Tea Party took place over 240 years ago.
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Rhode Island School of Design Museum (RISD)
The RISD Museum acquires, preserves, exhibits, and interprets works of art and design representing diverse cultures from ancient times to the present. Distinguished by its relationship to the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), the Museum educates and inspires artists, designers, students, scholars, and the general public through exhibitions, programs, and publications. RISD Museum's collection currently contains more than 100,000 works of art and design dating from ancient times to today including paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, costume and textiles, and furniture from all over the world. Of these objects, 3,352 of them are on view in the Museum now, 81,343 of them are available online, and there are 3,867 recent acquisitions.
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Roger Williams Park
Since the 1890’s, Roger Williams Park has been the premier playground for both Providence and Rhode Island residents. Designed in 1874 by landscape architect Horace W.S. Cleveland, the entire park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The park’s 435 acres feature over 100 acres of ponds that weave their way through the rolling landscape. Major attractions include the nationally-recognized Roger Williams Park Zoo, the Museum of Natural History and Planetarium, the Botanical Center, the Casino, the Carousel Village, the Temple to Music, the Todd Morsilli tennis courts, and the Tim O’Neil baseball fields.
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Marble House
Marble House was built between 1888 and 1892 for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt. It was a summer house, or "cottage", as Newporters called them in remembrance of the modest houses of the early 19th century. But Marble House was much more; it was a social and architectural landmark that set the pace for Newport's subsequent transformation from a quiet summer colony of wooden houses to the legendary resort of opulent stone palaces. The house was designed by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The cost of the house was reported in contemporary press accounts to be $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. Upon its completion, Mr. Vanderbilt gave the house to his wife as a 39th birthday present. The Vanderbilts divorced in 1895 and Alva married Oliver H.P. Belmont, moving down the street to Belcourt. After his death, she reopened Marble House, and had a Chinese Tea House built on the seaside cliffs, where she hosted rallies for women's right to vote. She sold the house to Frederick H. Prince in 1932. The Preservation Society acquired the house in 1963 from the Prince estate. In 2006, Marble House was designated a National Historic Landmark.
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Bronx Zoo
The Bronx Zoo of the Wildlife Conservation Society is the premier place to study and appreciate the world's many creatures. Home to more than 6,000 animals, the zoo spans 265 acres that re-create the diverse natural habitats of its numerous residents. Open year-round, it’s a great experience in any season. During the winter, be sure to stop by Tiger Mountain or Himalayan Highlands to see big cats enjoying the chilly outdoors—then head to World of Reptiles or JungleWorld for a warm up with tropical wildlife.
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art presents over 5,000 years of art from around the world for everyone to experience and enjoy. The Museum lives in three iconic sites in New York City—The Met Fifth Avenue, The Met Breuer, and The Met Cloisters. Since it was founded in 1870, The Met has always aspired to be more than a treasury of rare and beautiful objects. Every day, art comes alive in the Museum's galleries and through its exhibitions and events, revealing both new ideas and unexpected connections across time and across cultures. On January 13, 2015, the Trustees of The Metropolitan Museum of Art reaffirmed this statement of purpose and supplemented it with the following statement of mission: The Metropolitan Museum of Art collects, studies, conserves, and presents significant works of art across all times and cultures in order to connect people to creativity, knowledge, and ideas.
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St. Patrick
St. Patrick's Cathedral is the Mother Church of the Archdiocese of New York and the seat of the Archbishop. Located on Fifth Avenue, across from Rockefeller Center, the sanctuary is the largest Gothic Catholic cathedral in the US. This international landmark, dedicated in 1879, welcomes more than five million visitors each year. With its 330-foot spires, it is one of the City's most spectacular architectural sights. Inside, it boasts a seating capacity of 2,400, numerous altars and stained glass windows, and a giant organ with 7,855 pipes.
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Rockefeller Center
A visit to New York City wouldn't be complete without a trip to Rockefeller Plaza, where skaters glide across the rink and thousands of lights gleam from the always-enormous Christmas tree in the winter, and outdoor dining options abound in the warmer months. No matter the season, come for the shops (from the FDNY Fire Zone store and museum to Swarovski), the eats (from Dean & DeLuca to Mendy's Kosher Deli) and the stargazing here in NBC Studios' backyard. The three observation decks at Top of the Rock showcase the City's spectacular skyline.
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Times Square
Flashing neon lights and giant digital billboards. Brilliant Broadway marquees. Costumed characters and musicians. Times Square is big, bright and unforgettable. Its main junction is filled with popular retailers—plus the TKTS discount booth, which offers up to 50 percent off theater tickets. Walk to the top of its red steps—you may know them from the "Empire State of Mind" video—for a sweeping view of the area, including One Times Square, the building from which the ball drops on New Year's Eve.
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American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog
The AKC Museum of the Dog has returned to New York City where it began over 35 years ago. The museum, with one of the finest collections of canine-related art, will occupy new purpose-built galleries in midtown Manhattan, just steps from Grand Central Station. Combining fine arts with cutting edge technology and interpretation, the Museum of the Dog provides unique and engaging experiences for visitors of all ages. The permanent collection of the museum is one of the finest and largest collections of canine-related fine art and artifacts in the world. It comprises paintings, watercolors, drawings, prints, ceramics and bronzes. Additionally, objects such as trophies, collars and other dog-related works are included in the collection. Representations of dogs in ceramic goes back centuries, and the collection reflects that rich history. One can encounter works from Staffordshire spill vases to modern day productions of many breeds from factories such as Meissen, Rosenthal, and Royal Doulton. The core experience in the museum is the touch screen interactive table that allows you to explore AKC registered breeds. Follow the breeds as they move across the screen; find your favorite and pull it down to your dog house. There you can learn about each breed’s unique physical features, personality traits, purpose/common jobs and history, and find the breeds depicted in artworks in the collection.
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Empire State Building
The world-famous Empire State Building located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, our 86th and 102nd floor observatories provide unforgettable 360° views of New York City and beyond. Whether you’re in town for a week or a day, no visit to NYC is complete without experiencing the top of the Empire State Building. The Empire State Building is more than a spectacular view. It’s an immersive experience inside a world famous landmark. In addition to our Observation Decks, your visit includes the newly restored lobby with its stunning art deco ceiling murals, the historical Dare To Dream Exhibit, and the Sustainability Exhibit.
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The High Line
When the weather is pleasant, there’s nothing quite like walking the High Line. NYC’s elevated park is certainly one of more popular New York attractions everyone needs to check off their list, and it's the perfect activity to take visitors from out of town. To give you a bit of history, the High Line was once a rail track, which went out of use in 1980. In 2009, the 1.45-mile-long strip was transformed into what is now considered one of the most unique parks in NYC. The urbanite playground features wildflowers, greenery and outdoor art installations in addition to killer views of New York’s skyline. Below, you’ll find everything you need to know as well as our recommendations for things to do on the High Line, including where to grab a bite and go shopping nearby.
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Brooklyn Bridge
Stretching across the East River, the iconic Brooklyn Bridge opened up back in 1883 to carry traffic (nonautomotive at the time) between Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn. One of the most recognizable parts of the New York City skyline, the bridge has been featured in movies and on television shows, and is a real piece of New York City history. A stroll across the elevated pedestrian walkway provides a true New York City experience. The Manhattan-side entrance is at Park Row and Centre Street, across from City Hall Park, east of City Hall; over on the Brooklyn side, enter at Cadman Plaza East or where Boerum Place meets Tillary Street.
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Brooklyn Botanic Garden
The Brooklyn Botanic Garden is as committed to education and conservation as it is to inspiration. Whether you’re looking to learn something or just want to soak up 52 acres of natural beauty, the BBG has more than 18,000 kinds of plants from all over the world. The garden is open year-round and has plants for every season, plus indoor tropical gardens and bonsai trees.
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Statue of Liberty
The Statue of Liberty is perhaps New York City's most familiar landmark and the easiest one to overlook since it's only accessible by boat. This historic monument has welcomed so many generations of hopeful Americans to our shores. The American Family Immigration History Center at Ellis Island contains more than 25 million Port of New York passenger arrival records and 900 ship pictures circa 1892–1924.
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Staten Island Zoo
The Staten Island Zoo might not be the largest or most exotic zoo around (its nickname is the "biggest little zoo"), but it is highly educational and acclaimed for its Serpentarium, housing an extensive collection of rattlesnakes. The zoo also cares for many warm-blooded creatures, with more than 800 species in all.
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Pointe-a-Calliere Montreal Archaeology and History Complex
Travel back in time to experience the life of Montréal's first inhabitants and settlers at Pointe-à-Callière, Montréal Archaeology and History Complex. The birthplace of Montréal and a National Historic and Archaeological Site, Pointe-à-Callière presents centuries of history, from Indigenous settlements to the present day. The experience begins with an avant-garde multimedia show on the city’s history. Projected onto an incredible, immersive set space created especially for the show, Generations MTL will dazzle you with its technological wizardry and artistic sensibility. From seats overlooking impressive archaeological remains, get wrapped up in this captivating narrative and learn how, over the centuries, borrowings and exchanges helped forge the city’s identity, making it a true hub at the crossroads of Europe and North America. In addition to the permanent exhibitions where history comes to life through the innovative use of multimedia technologies, the museum presents temporary exhibits on the world's great civilizations, near and far, and a full calendar of cultural activities for the whole family. When it’s time to take a break, L’Arrivage Bistro on the second floor of the main building offers a delicious menu with an exceptional view of the Old Port.
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Mary Queen of the World Cathedral
Nestled among busy office buildings in Montréal’s downtown core, lies Mary Queen of the World Cathedral, the third largest church in Québec after Saint Joseph’s Oratory and the Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré. Built at the end of the 19th century in the heart of what was then the city's Anglo-Protestant sector, this ornate Renaissance cathedral is replica of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, a departure from the Gothic Revival style so popular at the time. Covering nearly 4,700 square meters, the cathedral is built in the shape of a Latin cross, with a large portico built in coursed ashlar and topped by a green copper dome. From high above, statues of the patron saints from Montréal’s thirteen parishes watch over all who enter. Inside, a superb neo-baroque baldachin in red copper and gold leaf overlooks the high altar. In the transept, paintings by Georges Delfosse illustrate the historic beginnings of Montréal while numerous works throughout bear witness to the city’s religious legacy.
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Notre-Dame Basilica of Montreal
Growing from a humble stone church in the 17th century to a minor basilica erected to welcome some 8,000 parishioners, Notre-Dame Basilica of Montréal stands as a majestic testament to the importance of religion and art throughout the city’s history. A jewel of Québec’s religious heritage, it is a masterpiece of Gothic Revival architecture. Built between 1824 and 1829, this site of national historic significance features dual towers reminiscent of Notre-Dame-de-Paris. The West Tower houses the famous 10,900-kg Jean-Baptiste bell, while the East Tower rings with a carillon of ten bells. Three large statues – Saint-Joseph, the Virgin Mary and Saint-Jean-Baptiste – keep vigil over the entrance to this religious sanctuary that welcomes millions of visitors each year.
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Place Jacques-Cartier and Place De La Dauversiere
No stroll through Old Montréal would be complete without a stop at Place Jacques-Cartier, a lively spot steeped in heritage. A meeting place for centuries, Montrealers and visitors alike gather here to admire the view of the Old Port, sit for a spell at an outdoor terrasse, take in performances of the many street artists and enjoy entertainment at every time of year. In fact, one could say that Place Jacques-Cartier is at its most magical during the Christmas season. Today, Place Jacques-Cartier teems with artists, artisans, portrait painters and musicians, however it offers more than just entertainment: history buffs appreciate the Nelson Monument, a 35-metre column erected in 1809, as well as the black pavement denoting the outline of the Château de Vaudreuil, former 18th-century governor’s mansion in New France. Continue your stroll east along Notre-Dame Street and you will come to Place De La Dauversière, across from City Hall. Today, it is a magnificent public garden where passers-by like to while away the hours, immersed in its rich history that begins with the very founding of Montréal. Named in honour of Jérôme Le Royer de La Dauversière, founder of the Société de Notre-Dame, it was the site of the Lemoine-Despins family home in 1750, then of James McGill in 1805.
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St. Patrick's Basilica
Better known as "The Irish Church", the Basilica was constructed between 1843 and 1847, and is a fine evocation of the Gothic style of the 14th and 15th centuries. It is characterized by its huge pine columns, the oak carving in the nave as well as the carved pulpit and choir loft.
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Chateau Ramezay Historic Site and Museum of Montreal
Walk in the steps of important historical figures the likes of Benjamin Franklin and cross the threshold of the Château Ramezay, a prestigious residence from the 18th century that recounts over 500 years of history through numerous exhibits and extensive multimedia circuits. A portal to Montréal’s past and the first building in Québec classified as an historic monument, the Château Ramezay offers insight into the events of the pre-contact Amerindian era to the 20th century and demonstrates how our history was shaped by the Native People, the French, the British, and the Americans. A permanent collection of over 30,000 objects and an array of temporary exhibitions, intermingled with multimedia portrayals of historical figures telling fabulous tales about this centuries-old manor, bring 18th century New France to life for a modern audience.
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The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
At over a hundred years old and still going strong, the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is more avant-garde and relevant than ever before. Driven by a daring and innovative approach, it has developed into a venerable museum complex revered by lovers of art, music and cinema from here and abroad. Founded in 1860, it was one of the first museums in North America to establish an encyclopedic collection. Today, it comprises over 43 000 works from Antiquity to modern day. Its five pavilions, each with a distinct vocation and architectural style, meld beautifully into the city’s urban fabric. The oldest of them all, the Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion, dates back to 1912. Its majestic marble staircase takes you to the Museum’s temporary exhibitions.
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Old Port of Montreal
The Old Port of Montreal is the historic port of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Located in Old Montreal, it stretches for over two kilometres along the St-Lawrence River in Old Montreal. It was used as early as 1611, when French fur traders as a trading post. The Old Port was redeveloped in the early 1990s, under the direction of architects Aurèle Cardinal and Peter Rose. Today it is a recreational and historical area and draws six million tourists annually. Old Port offers access to a wide variety of activities, including the Montreal Science Centre, with an IMAX Theatre, and the Montreal Clock Tower. It offers riverfront access for walking, cycling, roller-blading, quadricycle, pedalo and Segway rentals.
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La Ronde
Where to start before such a vast choice? Right here. See all the fascinating things you can do at La Ronde, a roller coaster that will give you adrenaline rush to the sweet rides for toddlers. Take a break watching one of our shows or grab a bite at one of our restaurants. Do not forget to bring back memories of your day! The whole family finds its account in La Ronde. Be ready to laugh a big shot! From the highest peaks to the loveliest adventures, we have a host of rides that you can enjoy together. In La Ronde you will find the rides that will make your group happy. Nothing leaves memories as memorable as a great show, especially when you're there with friends or family. In addition to offering you the most exciting rides on the planet, La Ronde presents a variety of high caliber entertainment, which you will remember for a long time.
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Saint Joseph Oratory of Mount Royal
Rising majestically above the cityscape is Saint Joseph’s Oratory of Mount Royal. It is the largest sanctuary dedicated to Saint Joseph and one of the world’s most visited pilgrimage sites with over 2 million visitors per year. In 1904, Brother André, a simple porter renowned for his miracle cures (which he attributed to Saint Joseph), set out to construct a small wooden chapel, which would ultimately become one of the city’s most impressive religious buildings. It wasn’t until 1967, thirty years after his death, that the immense sanctuary was completed. The shrine includes a majestic basilica for close to 2,000 worshippers, with a dome that reaches a soaring 97 metres, the original chapel, a votive chapel, and a crypt. Here lies Brother André, canonized in 2010 as Saint André of Montréal by Pope Benedict XVI in Rome. The Museum of Saint Joseph’s Oratory, primarily dedicated to sacred art, houses an exceptional collection of crèches, a must-see during the holidays.
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Co-Cathedral Saint Anthony of Padua
The museum first opened in November 1998 and was renovated in 2016. Its permanent exhibition, located in the lower level of the Co-Cathedral of Saint-Antoine, houses nine separate sections highlighting our rich historical and religious heritage. Certain objects on display date back to the earliest days of the Saint-Antoine-de-Padoue Parish, which was founded in 1698. The museum’s 1998 inauguration was the culmination of a nearly three-year effort to seek funding, inventory objects, conduct research, produce a catalogue, and organize the opening. In 2016, committed to make the Co-Cathedral known to future generations, the fabrique decided to renovate the museum and the crypt. Museologists and the Longueuil Historical Society combined their talents and skills to ensure the successful completion of the project.
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Saint Laurent Boulevard
One of Montréal’s most iconic spots, Saint-Laurent Boulevard offers up an effusive, eclectic and multicultural mix of things to see and do, indoors and out, any time of the day. Which is exactly why everyone loves “The Main”! People of all stripes and colours converge at this buzzy hub—a north-south stretch that divides the city into east and west, to be exact—to shop, eat, drink and mingle, and check out some of the city’s hottest new trends. Its nightlife is legendary too, with crowds converging in laid-back brewpubs, trendy clubs, cheeky cabarets, karaoke bars, dance halls and divebars until the wee hours of the morning. The unique venues here are also choice picks for catching hot artists and up-and-coming acts: just think, you might be lucky enough to see the next big thing! In warmer weather, the strip is also host to colourful festivals, weekend-long sidewalk sales and art on a major scale with the incredibly popular MURAL Festival, the most important urban art festival in North America.
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Jean-Talon Market
The multicultural flavors and sights of the Jean-Talon Market have been attracting crowds to Little Italy since 1933. One of North America’s largest open-air public markets, its lively atmosphere, authentic character and wide selection of fresh, local produce and specialities from here and abroad always make for a pleasant – and appetizing – outing. True to its culture and spirit, the Jean-Talon Market showcases local and ethnic eats and a diverse array of merchants. Fruit, vegetable and flower stalls line the walkways alongside a tasty array of specialty shops that feature spices, oils, cheeses, meats, pastries and other exquisite Québec products. Butchers and fishmongers enthusiastically hawk their wares, always ready to share a recipe or recommend something new. Open year-round, the market changes with the seasons. In the spring, it blooms with a bouquet of annuals, perennials and seeds while the sugary scent of maple treats tickles the nostrils and the sweet tooth. Summertime starts with fresh asparagus and strawberries, then matures into a cornucopia of fresh produce picked daily. Come fall, the market is abuzz with the richness of the harvest, while in winter, it lights up with the festive spirit, Christmas trees, wreaths and all.
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Montreal Botanical Garden
The Jardin botanique de Montréal, one of the city’s jewels, is recognized as one of the world’s greatest botanical gardens. It offers a colourful program of events, exhibitions and activities all year long. With its collection of 22,000 plant species and cultivars, 10 exhibition greenhouses, Frédéric Back Tree Pavilion, and more than 20 thematic gardens spread out over 75 hectares, it’s also a perfect place to enjoy fresh air and natural beauty. Located just minutes from downtown Montréal, right near the Biodôme and Olympic Park, the Jardin botanique de Montréal is a veritable living museum of plants from the four corners of the globe.
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Tuckerton Seaport
A working maritime museum located along the historic Tuckerton Creek, Tuckerton Seaport is only 25-minutes from Atlantic City. The museum celebrates life on the Jersey Shore with many events and activities for all ages and interests. Watch history come alive as docents build boats, carve decoys, discuss clam digging, and more. Open 7-days a week.
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Church of La Visitation-de-la-Bienheureuse Vierge Marie
The church of La Visitation, the oldest church on the island of Montreal, is a heritage treasure that makes us discover our roots and our common history. It has come down to us from the time of New France to this day. It is up to us to protect it in order to pass it on to future generations.
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Venice Island Performing Arts and Recreation Center
Venice Island Performing Arts and Recreation Center's mission and priorities have emerged from the hopes and aspirations expressed by City of Philadelphia and Manayunk neighborhood leaders, the Executive Advisory Board, and over 500 residents who participated in surveying and community conversations.
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Reading Terminal Market
This indoor foodie paradise is an almost unbelievable one-stop shop for everything from local produce and meats to artisanal cheeses and desserts. The public space also provides open seating where customers can enjoy meals from more than 30 restaurants, ranging from hot roast pork sandwiches from DiNic’s to duck noodle soup from Sang Kee Peking.