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Architecture in Boston

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Freedom Trail
The famous Freedom Trail is a 2.5 mile red-brick trail through Boston’s historic neighborhoods that tells the story of the American Revolution. From the Old North Church to Faneuil Hall, and through resonant burying grounds, visit the temples and landmarks of the Revolutionary Era.
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Adams National Historical Park
Adams National Historical Park, Quincy, MA, is comprised of the birthplace homes of Presidents John and John Quincy Adams; the Old House, home to four generations of the Adams family; and the Stone Library. Many park programs and special events are offered to give kids of all ages an opportunity to Picture Themselves in the Past and see themselves in their nation's future. Contact the park for dates and details.
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Marble House
Marble House was built between 1888 and 1892 for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt. It was a summer house, or "cottage", as Newporters called them in remembrance of the modest houses of the early 19th century. But Marble House was much more; it was a social and architectural landmark that set the pace for Newport's subsequent transformation from a quiet summer colony of wooden houses to the legendary resort of opulent stone palaces. The house was designed by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The cost of the house was reported in contemporary press accounts to be $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. Upon its completion, Mr. Vanderbilt gave the house to his wife as a 39th birthday present. The Vanderbilts divorced in 1895 and Alva married Oliver H.P. Belmont, moving down the street to Belcourt. After his death, she reopened Marble House, and had a Chinese Tea House built on the seaside cliffs, where she hosted rallies for women's right to vote. She sold the house to Frederick H. Prince in 1932. The Preservation Society acquired the house in 1963 from the Prince estate. In 2006, Marble House was designated a National Historic Landmark.
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St. Patrick
St. Patrick's Cathedral is the Mother Church of the Archdiocese of New York and the seat of the Archbishop. Located on Fifth Avenue, across from Rockefeller Center, the sanctuary is the largest Gothic Catholic cathedral in the US. This international landmark, dedicated in 1879, welcomes more than five million visitors each year. With its 330-foot spires, it is one of the City's most spectacular architectural sights. Inside, it boasts a seating capacity of 2,400, numerous altars and stained glass windows, and a giant organ with 7,855 pipes.
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Rockefeller Center
A visit to New York City wouldn't be complete without a trip to Rockefeller Plaza, where skaters glide across the rink and thousands of lights gleam from the always-enormous Christmas tree in the winter, and outdoor dining options abound in the warmer months. No matter the season, come for the shops (from the FDNY Fire Zone store and museum to Swarovski), the eats (from Dean & DeLuca to Mendy's Kosher Deli) and the stargazing here in NBC Studios' backyard. The three observation decks at Top of the Rock showcase the City's spectacular skyline.
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Times Square
Flashing neon lights and giant digital billboards. Brilliant Broadway marquees. Costumed characters and musicians. Times Square is big, bright and unforgettable. Its main junction is filled with popular retailers—plus the TKTS discount booth, which offers up to 50 percent off theater tickets. Walk to the top of its red steps—you may know them from the "Empire State of Mind" video—for a sweeping view of the area, including One Times Square, the building from which the ball drops on New Year's Eve.
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Empire State Building
The world-famous Empire State Building located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, our 86th and 102nd floor observatories provide unforgettable 360° views of New York City and beyond. Whether you’re in town for a week or a day, no visit to NYC is complete without experiencing the top of the Empire State Building. The Empire State Building is more than a spectacular view. It’s an immersive experience inside a world famous landmark. In addition to our Observation Decks, your visit includes the newly restored lobby with its stunning art deco ceiling murals, the historical Dare To Dream Exhibit, and the Sustainability Exhibit.
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Brooklyn Bridge
Stretching across the East River, the iconic Brooklyn Bridge opened up back in 1883 to carry traffic (nonautomotive at the time) between Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn. One of the most recognizable parts of the New York City skyline, the bridge has been featured in movies and on television shows, and is a real piece of New York City history. A stroll across the elevated pedestrian walkway provides a true New York City experience. The Manhattan-side entrance is at Park Row and Centre Street, across from City Hall Park, east of City Hall; over on the Brooklyn side, enter at Cadman Plaza East or where Boerum Place meets Tillary Street.
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Statue of Liberty
The Statue of Liberty is perhaps New York City's most familiar landmark and the easiest one to overlook since it's only accessible by boat. This historic monument has welcomed so many generations of hopeful Americans to our shores. The American Family Immigration History Center at Ellis Island contains more than 25 million Port of New York passenger arrival records and 900 ship pictures circa 1892–1924.
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Mary Queen of the World Cathedral
Nestled among busy office buildings in Montréal’s downtown core, lies Mary Queen of the World Cathedral, the third largest church in Québec after Saint Joseph’s Oratory and the Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré. Built at the end of the 19th century in the heart of what was then the city's Anglo-Protestant sector, this ornate Renaissance cathedral is replica of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, a departure from the Gothic Revival style so popular at the time. Covering nearly 4,700 square meters, the cathedral is built in the shape of a Latin cross, with a large portico built in coursed ashlar and topped by a green copper dome. From high above, statues of the patron saints from Montréal’s thirteen parishes watch over all who enter. Inside, a superb neo-baroque baldachin in red copper and gold leaf overlooks the high altar. In the transept, paintings by Georges Delfosse illustrate the historic beginnings of Montréal while numerous works throughout bear witness to the city’s religious legacy.
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Notre-Dame Basilica of Montreal
Growing from a humble stone church in the 17th century to a minor basilica erected to welcome some 8,000 parishioners, Notre-Dame Basilica of Montréal stands as a majestic testament to the importance of religion and art throughout the city’s history. A jewel of Québec’s religious heritage, it is a masterpiece of Gothic Revival architecture. Built between 1824 and 1829, this site of national historic significance features dual towers reminiscent of Notre-Dame-de-Paris. The West Tower houses the famous 10,900-kg Jean-Baptiste bell, while the East Tower rings with a carillon of ten bells. Three large statues – Saint-Joseph, the Virgin Mary and Saint-Jean-Baptiste – keep vigil over the entrance to this religious sanctuary that welcomes millions of visitors each year.
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Place Jacques-Cartier and Place De La Dauversiere
No stroll through Old Montréal would be complete without a stop at Place Jacques-Cartier, a lively spot steeped in heritage. A meeting place for centuries, Montrealers and visitors alike gather here to admire the view of the Old Port, sit for a spell at an outdoor terrasse, take in performances of the many street artists and enjoy entertainment at every time of year. In fact, one could say that Place Jacques-Cartier is at its most magical during the Christmas season. Today, Place Jacques-Cartier teems with artists, artisans, portrait painters and musicians, however it offers more than just entertainment: history buffs appreciate the Nelson Monument, a 35-metre column erected in 1809, as well as the black pavement denoting the outline of the Château de Vaudreuil, former 18th-century governor’s mansion in New France. Continue your stroll east along Notre-Dame Street and you will come to Place De La Dauversière, across from City Hall. Today, it is a magnificent public garden where passers-by like to while away the hours, immersed in its rich history that begins with the very founding of Montréal. Named in honour of Jérôme Le Royer de La Dauversière, founder of the Société de Notre-Dame, it was the site of the Lemoine-Despins family home in 1750, then of James McGill in 1805.
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St. Patrick's Basilica
Better known as "The Irish Church", the Basilica was constructed between 1843 and 1847, and is a fine evocation of the Gothic style of the 14th and 15th centuries. It is characterized by its huge pine columns, the oak carving in the nave as well as the carved pulpit and choir loft.
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The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
At over a hundred years old and still going strong, the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is more avant-garde and relevant than ever before. Driven by a daring and innovative approach, it has developed into a venerable museum complex revered by lovers of art, music and cinema from here and abroad. Founded in 1860, it was one of the first museums in North America to establish an encyclopedic collection. Today, it comprises over 43 000 works from Antiquity to modern day. Its five pavilions, each with a distinct vocation and architectural style, meld beautifully into the city’s urban fabric. The oldest of them all, the Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion, dates back to 1912. Its majestic marble staircase takes you to the Museum’s temporary exhibitions.
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Saint Joseph Oratory of Mount Royal
Rising majestically above the cityscape is Saint Joseph’s Oratory of Mount Royal. It is the largest sanctuary dedicated to Saint Joseph and one of the world’s most visited pilgrimage sites with over 2 million visitors per year. In 1904, Brother André, a simple porter renowned for his miracle cures (which he attributed to Saint Joseph), set out to construct a small wooden chapel, which would ultimately become one of the city’s most impressive religious buildings. It wasn’t until 1967, thirty years after his death, that the immense sanctuary was completed. The shrine includes a majestic basilica for close to 2,000 worshippers, with a dome that reaches a soaring 97 metres, the original chapel, a votive chapel, and a crypt. Here lies Brother André, canonized in 2010 as Saint André of Montréal by Pope Benedict XVI in Rome. The Museum of Saint Joseph’s Oratory, primarily dedicated to sacred art, houses an exceptional collection of crèches, a must-see during the holidays.
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Co-Cathedral Saint Anthony of Padua
The museum first opened in November 1998 and was renovated in 2016. Its permanent exhibition, located in the lower level of the Co-Cathedral of Saint-Antoine, houses nine separate sections highlighting our rich historical and religious heritage. Certain objects on display date back to the earliest days of the Saint-Antoine-de-Padoue Parish, which was founded in 1698. The museum’s 1998 inauguration was the culmination of a nearly three-year effort to seek funding, inventory objects, conduct research, produce a catalogue, and organize the opening. In 2016, committed to make the Co-Cathedral known to future generations, the fabrique decided to renovate the museum and the crypt. Museologists and the Longueuil Historical Society combined their talents and skills to ensure the successful completion of the project.
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Church of La Visitation-de-la-Bienheureuse Vierge Marie
The church of La Visitation, the oldest church on the island of Montreal, is a heritage treasure that makes us discover our roots and our common history. It has come down to us from the time of New France to this day. It is up to us to protect it in order to pass it on to future generations.
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Fairmount Park
Fairmount Park boasts many architectural treasures, seven of which are maintained as historic house museums open to the public. Located on the banks of the Schuylkill River, these homes originally served as the rural summer villas for well-to-do families during the eighteenth- and early-nineteenth century.
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Boathouse Row
Local boating clubs take great pride in their historic 19th-century boathouses, which line the Schuylkill River just west of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. At night, lights outline one of the city’s loveliest views, aptly named Boathouse Row. Rowers of all ages and skill levels flock to the Schuylkill River to practice, compete, learn and explore the sport of rowing along Boathouse Row, be it a single rower on a peaceful early morning or an exciting weekend regatta with lots of noise, colors and fanfare. Sandwiched between Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill River, Boathouse Row features a series of historic structures. Sandwiched between Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill River in Fairmount Park, Boathouse Row features Lloyd Hall recreation center and historic rowing clubs claiming the next 10 buildings all the way to the Sedgely Club, a private social enclave, which rounds out the Row.
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Absecon Lighthouse
The view from New Jersey’s tallest lighthouse is just what you’d expect: breathtaking. It’s perhaps the only fitting reward for climbing the 228 stairs it will take you to get to the top. The Absecon Lighthouse was the brainchild of Dr. Jonathan Pitney, who many refer to as “the father of Atlantic City.” Pitney first proposed the lighthouse in 1830; the government was late in responding to the request and concluded more than a decade later that a lighthouse was unnecessary. Pitney wrote letters and gathered petition signatures for several years before the lighthouse was finally approved and completed in 1857. The 171-foot lighthouse (the third-tallest in the U.S.) shone with a kerosene flame through a French-made first-order Fresnel lens, though the kerosene light was eventually replaced with an electric one. Today the lighthouse is a landmark tourism attraction, drawing visitors from around New Jersey and the country.
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Military Communications and Electronics Museum
If you haven’t been to the Military Communications and Electronics Museum, you might be surprised at how large it is. Its huge collection includes military jeeps, tanks, equipment for laying cable, radar built so well that it served the Air Force for over 50 years and displays telling the story of the incredibly difficult conditions that soldiers worked under. In the Passchendaele display, you learn about the soldiers who manned the wireless sets under heavy fire, seeing their aerial shot down on average twenty times a day. In another section of the museum, you peer into the back of a truck, built in Windsor, but radically transformed to meet the needs of the Communications and Electronics (C & E) Branch of the Canadian Military to operate its mobile telephone exchange.
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Fort Henry
Step back in time and experience 19th-Century military life at Fort Henry. As one of Ontario’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Fort Henry is a hotbed of historic activity. Take a guided tour, fire a rifle, sit in on a class in a Victorian schoolroom, watch a parade of traditional marching music, and stick around in the evening for a dramatic reenactment during the Sunset Ceremony. Visit Fort Henry throughout the year as it plays host to a number of Kingston’s favourite events like the YGK Craft Beer Fest, Cannonball Crush, and Fort Fright. Fort Henry is a can’t-miss stop during your time in Kingston.
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Murney Tower
Built in 1846, Murney Tower is one of the finest Martello Towers in North America and served as military housing for more than 40 years after its completion. A museum since 1925, it has an extensive collection of military and domestic artefacts of 19th-century Kingston.
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Kingston Grand Theatre
One of the main cultural venues in the greater Kingston region, the City of Kingston’s Grand Theatre serves as the prime performing arts venue for hundreds of professional and amateur performances annually including ballet, modern dance, theatre, variety, musicals, comedy and more. The building houses an array of performance and reception spaces including the Regina Rosen Auditorium, the Baby Grand, a black box theatre, two lounges used for receptions and art exhibits; as well as a lobby and backstage facilities. Located in the heart of downtown Kingston on Princess St., the Grand Theatre is a year-round destination for residents and visitors.
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Bellevue House
As a Father of Confederation and Canada’s first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald has had a direct impact on how Canada has grown from a small colony into a world leading democratic country. Tour the gardens of historic Bellevue House knowing that seeds were planted there for the birth of a country. Sir John A. Macdonald, and his family made Bellevue House their home from 1848 to 1849. Wander through the family’s preserved kitchen garden to help the costumed gardeners, watch them wielding scythes to cut the lawn in the method of the 1840s and bite into an apple in the heirloom orchard. Be escorted on a journey back in time, following a maid on an Estate Tour to hear tales about the past at Bellevue House and its most famous residents. Explore the juicy deets of Canadian history through an interactive discussion led by an interpreter, while jumping on an Alternative Facts Tour or simply sip a cup of tea relaxing on the grounds and enjoying the view.
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Rue Saint Jean
A stroll along rue Saint-Jean is a must for anyone visiting Québec City. Starting from centrally located Place D’Youville, a string of boutiques, restaurants, churches, and historic buildings create a unique and eclectic ambiance. And when the street is closed to traffic in summer, pedestrians take over and a festive atmosphere reigns. Religion, politics, and education converge at Place de l’Hôtel-de-Ville, home to City Hall and just steps from Notre-Dame de Québec Cathedral-Basilica and the historic Séminaire de Québec. In summer, you can watch the performances of the public entertainers while the charming wooden kiosks of the German Christmas Market settle there from late November to end of December. The ice rink at Place D'Youville is the perfect place to experience Québec City's winter. From mid-November, put on skates and enjoy its magical atmosphere!
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Petit Champlain District
Rue du Petit-Champlain, one of the oldest commercial streets in North America, is lined with one-of-a-kind boutiques and restaurants. The Petit-Champlain district isn’t just illuminated for the holidays—it stays decorated all winter long, much to everyone’s delight. It’s the ideal place to bundle up for a winter evening stroll in an enchanting atmosphere straight out of a Christmas fairy tale. The French influence is evident everywhere you look in Place Royale and along Rue du Petit-Champlain. The two—and three—storey plastered stone homes with their dormer windows, gabled roofs, large chimneys and firewalls rising above the rooftops make it hard to believe you’re not in France.
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Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac
More than a hotel, the Fairmont Le Château Frontenac is a Québec City icon. For over a century, it has perched atop Cape Diamond overlooking Dufferin Terrace and the St. Lawrence River. You can come inside and admire the recently renovated lobby along with historical artifacts going back 400 years displayed in specially designed cases. The Château was the brainchild of William Van Horne, president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, who wanted to build a hotel to draw travellers as a way to promote luxury train travel. Many famous people have made the Château Frontenac their residence during their time in Québec City. From Queen Elizabeth II to Céline Dion, via Princess Grace of Monaco, Leonardo DiCaprio, Paul McCartney and Charlie Chaplin, celebrities have made the Château Frontenac their home away from home.
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Old Quebec
A UNESCO World Heritage treasure, Old Québec is the only fortified city north of Mexico. Bask in the European charm as you stroll through the old quarters and take in over 400 years of history in the birthplace of French North America.
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Musee du Fort
Through a 30-minute sound and light show, travel back in time to the foundation of Québec to revisit the six military sieges that shaped its history! This exciting historical period is brought to life with an impressive model of the city circa 1750. Located in the heart of Old Québec, start your visit to Québec City with a bang at the Musée du Fort!
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Saint-Roch District
Over $500 million was invested in Québec City's new downtown core, the revitalized Saint-Roch district. The spirit of innovation fostered by Saint-Roch makes it the hub of the Greater Québec Area. The many avant-garde businesses, shops and restaurants, local breweries, bars found here create a vibrant atmosphere that appeals to local residents and visitors alike. Saint-Roch owes its distinctive flair to its cultural, commercial and artistic vitality that rivals that of the greatest North American metropolises. Over 130 shops! In summer, young professionals from the web and video game industries blend in with the student crowd looking for a place to eat outside in Jardin Jean-Paul-L’Allier, a real oasis of greenery in the heart of the city. In winter, Saint-Roch is illuminated by a 15-metre Christmas tree; simply magical!
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Historic Cold Spring Village
Visit 26 restored historic buildings on 30 shaded acres where interpreters in period clothing bring the 1800s to life. Enjoy demonstrations of blacksmithing, basket weaving, book binding and more! Farm animals, carriage rides, and family activities from June-September. Special weekend events. Country Store, Ice Cream Parlor and Restaurant. Education and distance learning programs from October-May.
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Canada Science and Technology Museum
The all-new Canada Science and Technology Museum provides a highly digital experience for the whole family – igniting visitors with a passion for science and inspiring the next generation of Canadian innovators. After undergoing an $80.5-million renewal of its entire building, the museum features over 7,400 m2 (80,000 sq. ft.) of redesigned exhibition space, including an 850 m2 (9,200 sq. ft.) temporary exhibition hall to accommodate travelling exhibitions from around the world. Eleven new exhibitions – including the ZOOOM Children’s Innovation Zone, Artifact Alley and the Exploratek maker studio – as well as long-time visitor favourites, like locomotives and the Crazy Kitchen, delight visitors young and old. Museum highlights: A modern, spacious facility featuring 11 brand-new exhibitions including Artifact Alley, the ZOOOM Children’s Innovation Zone, the Exploratek maker studio, and three new apps. Long-time visitor favourites – the Crazy Kitchen and locomotives – will also make a comeback to the delight of visitors. A Demo Stage offers exciting, participatory science demonstrations. In addition, the museum has the capacity to showcase international travelling exhibitions from around the world.
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Bank of Canada Museum
Enter the heart of the economic system and explore fun, hands-on, interactive exhibits that cover everything from how people’s expectations affect the health of an economy to how inflation targeting works (hint: you get to fly a rocket ship!). Mixed in with all the high-tech inter actives are informative videos, multimedia stations and old-school exhibits featuring centuries’ worth of economic artifacts: from shells once used as money, to bank notes made from tree bark, together with their history and lore.Stimulating. Engaging. Most of all, fun. Come join us and explore the Bank’s role in the economy and your own, very important, place in it.
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Parliament Hill
Parliament Hill is one of Canada’s most iconic sites and a must-see when visiting Canada’s capital. The historic, neo-Gothic Parliament Buildings stand tall on a hill overlooking the majestic Ottawa River in downtown Ottawa. And although the buildings are home to the country’s federal government (Prime Minister Justin Trudeau works there), visitors are welcome on-site for free tours and programming all year-long. Whether you visit Parliament Hill for a selfie, for a tour, or to experience one of the many free events, you’ll never run out of things to discover!