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Oceania

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Australia
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Sydney Opera House
Fusing ancient and modernist influences, and situated on a site sacred to the Gadigal people for thousands of years, the sculptural elegance of the Sydney Opera House has made it one of the symbols of twentieth century architecture - a building that, to quote US architect Frank Gehry, “changed the image of an entire country.”
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Bondi Beach
The day begins early at Bondi Beach. As a glorious sunrise edges above the ocean horizon, surfers gracefully carve up waves, joggers limber up on the promenade and swimmers flip turn in Bondi Baths. The famous beach is buzzing from dawn to dusk and then Bondi’s night-time scene sparkles.The beautiful sandy beach is perfect for travel snaps or selfies at any time of the year. Just 8km from the city centre, Bondi is easy to get to by public transport – the trip from Town Hall is 30 minutes. Or you can take a scenic ferry ride from Circular Quay to Watsons Bay for a connecting bus to Bondi.
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Murrays Beach
Known as the jewel in the Booderee National Park, Murrays Beach offers swimmers and snorkelers alike, pristine clear waters and pearly white sand. Perfect for families, Murrays Beach is situated in a protected bay which is sheltered by Bowen Island. Accessed via Jervis Bay Road through Booderee National Park, there are many self-guided walks around Murrays Beach from which to explore. From the Munyunga waraga dhugan (loop walk) to the various low tide walks, you are sure to leave with breathtaking views and sightings of Booderee's plants, animals, culture and history
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Bare Island Fort - La Perouse
Captain Cook first spotted the area now known as Bare Island in 1770, and referred to it in his journal as 'a small bare island'. The fort was built in the early 1880s to protect Sydney’s back door. It was in operation until 1908, after which time it became Australia's first war veterans' home.
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Bronte Beach
Bronte is just over a kilometer’s walk south of Bondi. The beach itself faces east and picks up swell from any direction, but bulky headlands to the north and south and clusters of underwater rocks make conditions challenging, especially for swimmers. The south headland shapes Bronte’s premium wave, but it breaks across rocks so it’s for confident board-riders only.Those same rocks create a sheltered natural pool beloved of parents with young kids, while an ocean-fed lap pool tucked in beneath the south headland provides one of Sydney’s finest saltwater swim experiences (free entry). A wide grassy park behind the beach has barbecues and picnic tables and gives way to a wooded gully between rows of expensive houses on the opposing hillsides.
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Darling Harbour
For amazing entertainment, delicious waterside dining and incredible wildlife, Darling Harbour is the perfect destination in the heart of Sydney. Meet penguins and dugongs at SEA LIFE Sydney Aquarium and get up close to koalas and a giant saltwater crocodile at WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo. You’ll find plenty more exciting things to do and see, from Sydney Harbour cruises and tall ships at the Australian National Maritime Museum to the Chinese Garden of Friendship, a tranquil haven. You can even walk the red carpet with your favourite star at Madame Tussauds, a wax museum.
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Australian Museum
Established in 1827, the Australian Museum (AM) is Australia’s first museum and has been at the forefront of scientific research, collection and education for more than 185 years. Through exhibitions and other public programs the AM continues to inform and amaze generations of visitors about the unique flora, fauna and cultures of Australia and the Pacific.
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Blue Mountains National Park
Scattered over more than 260,000 hectares and part of the UNESCO-protected Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, Blue Mountains National Park is the most visited national park in NSW and a favourite playground for Sydneysiders.Renowned for the Three Sisters rock formation, the park incorporates many other spectacular landmarks and offers opportunities for exploration and immersion into nature. Explore exhilarating walks, discover Aboriginal history, hike to tumbling waterfalls and enjoy picnics in parks with stunning, far-reaching vistas of ancient escarpments and forest-clad valleys.
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Manly Beach
You're spoilt for choice when it comes to Manly Beach. Whether you want to spread a towel out and enjoy the soft white sand all day, surf its waves or explore its depths while snorkelling or diving, there's something for everyone. For those that prefer to look at it, it also makes a great backdrop for picnics or walking and cycle tracks. Manly is where the world's first surfing contest was held in 1964, making it one of Australia's most famous beaches. The iconic beach curves from South Steyne to North Steyne and Queenscliff, where a submerged reef, or bombora, creates the waves that inspire the world's best surfers to travel to our shores.
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Sea Life Sydney Aquarium
Located in the heart of Darling Harbour, SEA LIFE Sydney Aquarium is an underwater journey of amazing discovery with 12 extraordinary themed zones. Meander through the Jurassic Seas, Great Barrier Reef, Bay of Rays and Dugong Island (just to name a few), then, immerse yourself in the underwater world of Shark Valley, the majestic ocean tunnel walk-through.
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The Rocks
With many things to do and see, a great way to see The Rocks is on foot. There are markets, museums, galleries and delicious food and wine experiences. Take a self-guided tour or join The Rocks Walking Tours. The I’m Free Tour starts at 6pm from outside Cadmans Cottage, built in 1816. Dave’s Pub Walks will take you to the colonial pubs in the area. The Rocks Dreaming Aboriginal Heritage Tour provides insights into indigenous culture. In a restored colonial sandstone warehouse is The Rocks Discovery Museum. You can also hire bicycles and pedal around the harbour foreshore.
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Palm Beach
There's a reason that Palm Beach doubles up as the setting for Summer Bay, the fictional beach in TV show Home & Away, the golden sand and sparkling blue sea make it look too good to be true. But there's more than just sea and sand here, explore Barrenjoey Head, Sydney’s northernmost seaside point and lots more. What makes Palm Beach, a narrow peninsular, so spectacular is its unbeatable location. It won nature's lottery and is surrounded by water on three sides: Pittwater to the west, the Pacific Ocean to the east, and Broken Bay to the north at the mouth of the Hawkesbury River, which meanders inland to historic Windsor. If you're planning on spending the day at Palmy, as the locals call it, bring your board because you'll enjoy excellent surf at the northern end of the beach. The southern end is more lo-fi, offering less active beachgoers a protected area for swimming in the ocean pool and pretty picnic spots under the pine trees.
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Bondi to Coogee Coastal Walk
Offering visitors to Sydney an opportunity to join in and do what the locals do - the Bondi to Coogee Walk is a popular coastal walk offering beautiful coastline vistas, cosy beaches and cafe strips for refuelling. It is six kilometres long and takes about two hours to complete at a good pace, but why not break it up with a freshly squeezed juice or a relaxed coffee, then finish with a swim at Coogee Beach. The walk passes one of the world's more scenic operational cemeteries, the Waverley Cemetery where graves of famous Australians such as Henry Lawson can be found.
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Taronga Zoo
One of Sydney's most famous attractions, the award-winning Taronga Zoo is home to over 4,000 animals, including Australian native wildlife, as well as rare and endangered exotic animals. Overlooking the magnificent Sydney Harbour, Taronga Zoo is just 12 minutes from the city by ferry. Open 365 days a year, admission includes daily keeper talks and shows, and access to the Sky Safari, Sydney's only cable car. Enjoy the QBE Free-Flight Bird Show overlooking Sydney Harbour, featuring some of the world's most spectacular birds and be delighted by the Daily Seal Show where Australian and Californian Sea-lions and the New Zealand Fur-seals will impress you with their grace and skill. Challenge yourself on Taronga's exciting new sky high adventure, Wild Ropes. Tackle obstacles, cross suspension bridges and soar through the trees while enjoying breath-taking views of Sydney Harbour.
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Collaroy Beach
Collaroy has great swimming conditions and is excellent for beginner surfers. While advanced surfers are more likely to look at nearby wave-magnets such as Narrabeen and Long Reef, Collaroy does offer a considerable advantage in amenities for visitors. Collaroy Beach has a fully accessible beach reserve and playground complete with disabled toilets, accessible picnic areas, rockpool and paths. For those in a wheelchair, it has a freewheeler wheelchair that can go in the water, and a liberty swing.
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Freshwater Beach
Freshwater is part of the Manly-Freshwater National and World Surfing Reserve that recognises the historical, cultural and environmental values of famous surfing beaches. It is where Duke Kahanamoku held his famous 1915 surfing demonstration that popularised surfing in Australia. Freshwater has some pretty reasonable waves in the one to two-metre mark. It can be busy on a summers day with people learning to surf, and families sticking in groups. For less experienced surfers, the break at the middle-northern end of the beach is an ideal spot for you. More experienced surfers may not get the wave they’re looking for but you can try the southern end which can get pumping with the right swell.
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Long Reef Beach
Long Reef is a perfect stretch of white sand. At the north end there is Long Reef Headland, a protected aquatic reserve, and a golf course. A walk to the top of the headland can often be rewarded by views of migrating whales. There are offshore reefs in the north (the Long Reef Bomboras) and beach breaks running the entire 1.6 kilometres south to Dee Why and, on weekdays there's every chance of getting a quality wave to yourself. The Long Reef Bomboras starts to break at one metre or so and in a big south swell can produce a beautiful wave up to five metres. Reliable sandbanks shape beach breaks that are great for beginners and intermediate surfers. North Long Reef is also a favourite for windsurfing and kitesurfing.
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Sydney Tower Eye
Sydney Tower Eye takes you to the highest point above Sydney for breathtaking 360 degree views of the beautiful harbour city. From the golden beaches to the distant Blue Mountains, you'll be amazed by the views. Your ticket includes the 4D cinema experience - the first produced in Australia - where you can uncover a new dimension to Sydney through a whole new perspective.
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Centennial Parklands
Centennial Parklands is the 'green lungs' of Sydney. Comprising three urban parks – Centennial Park, Moore Park and Queens Park, almost 31 million people visit our parks annually.Dedicated to the people of NSW as an open space for recreation by Sir Henry Parkes in 1888, modern-day Centennial Park's sports fields, BBQs, playgrounds and picnic areas are aligned with his vision of ‘The People’s Park’.Popular with Sydney’s sport-lovers, Moore Park’s 115-hectares house the Hordern Pavilion, Hall of Industries, Entertainment Quarter, Equestrian Centre, E.S. Marks Athletics Field, a public golf course and sports centre.Queens Park is a haven for Sydney's sport lovers! Located in Centennial Parklands, the 26-hectare park features sports fields, a kids playground, free BBQ facilities, a café and spectacular views of the Sydney region.
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Ocean Beach Umina
Located between Umina Beach and Ettalong Beach at the southern end of the Central Coast and nestled within the protection of Broken Bay you will find over two kilometres of golden sand to relax on and enjoy. Ocean Beach provides the beauty of an ocean beach with the safety of an inland waterway, offering a perfect location for families. Picnic tables with seating are available, along with barbecue's and a children's playground. The beach is patrolled every day from October long weekend until the end of the April school holiday break. Public facilities are available as well as lovely grassed and under cover picnic areas.
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Bondi to Bronte coastal walk
Its combination of beaches, parks and spectacular views make this walk unique. It started out as a state project during the 1930s, it now extends from Ben Buckler Point to the southern end of Waverley Cemetery (and on to Coogee; for information call Randwick Council). It includes Bondi, Tamarama and Bronte beaches and a medium gradient cliff-top path from Bondi to Tamarama, with occasional seating and several staircases. The beachside parks offer picnic shelters, coin-operated barbecues, play areas, kiosks, toilets and change-rooms. The total length of the walk (Ben Buckler to Waverley Cemetery) is approximately 4 km; allow 1.5 hours walking time. Ben Buckler to Bondi Beach: about 0.5 km; allow 10 minutes.Bondi Promenade: 1 km; allow 15 minutes.South Bondi to North Bronte: about 1.5 km; allow 45 minutes.South Bronte to Waverley Cemetery: about 1 km; allow 20 minutes.
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Bronte House
Bronte House's story begins in 1836 when William Mortimer Lewis, Colonial Architect, bought 42 acres of land at 'Nelson Bay' (the name given to the bay at Bronte Beach). He began building a house but when an econmic depression hit in 1843, was forced to sell the property before its completion.Robert Lowe, an English barrister and later NSW parliamentarian bought the property as a 'country residence' and finished the house in 1845. He and his wife Georgiana were some of the Bronte House's most charismatic inhabitants, despite only being in resident for four years.The house change hands quickly over the next couple of years, until the Ebsworth family bought the property in 1882. They were the longest private owners of Bronte House; the family occupying the property over three generations. In 1948 the Ebsworths sold the house and its ground to Waverley Council.
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Bronte's Baths
The Bronte Baths story begins in 1883 when Waverley Council set aside 150 pounds to build sea baths at Bronte. Before the Baths there was an existing swimming spot in this location, known as "the bogey hole at South Nelson Bay".Construction of the Baths commenced in 1887 under the supervision of A. Williams, anengineer with the NSW Department of Public Works, Harbours and Rivers Branch. At the same time Williams was supervising the building of the Bondi Baths.
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Skipper a Clipper Boat Charter
At Skipper a Clipper we offer a wide range of boats for you to choose from - power boats, yachts and catamarans. We invite you to spend your holiday aboard our yachts and want to match you up with the best choice. Explore the breathtaking beauty of iconic Pittwater, with its charming bays and coves, just 40 minutes drive from Sydney's CBD. Swim in the clearest waters, sunbath on the snow-white deck, relax on the soothing bay waves and experience the peace of the starry night sky at sea.
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Queens Park
Queens Park is a 26-hectare urban park, set in a natural amphitheatre at the foot of dramatic sandstone cliffs, with panoramic views of the Sydney region.To this day Queens Park is used for informal recreation and organised sport, featuring cricket, rugby, soccer, and touch football fields bordered by sandstone outcrops and established trees. A viewing area located the sandstone ridge on the eastern edge of the Park offers spectacular views of Queens Park with the Sydney City skyline as a backdrop.Queens Park has cricket pitches, soccer, rugby and touch football fields available for hire on a casual or seasonal basis.
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Charing Cross Hotel
Located in Bronte on Sydney's eastern beaches, the Charing Cross Hotel is a contemporary gastro pub influenced by modern European & Australian cuisine. Initially built by Irish convict William Newland who gained his freedom in 1833 & borrowed £600 to build the Charing Cross Hotel. The first Hotel in the area, it was regularly used as the first council meeting place in the area, while Newland St (named after our first publican) is still the home of Waverley Council's Bondi Junction office.These days, the pub has had a rejuvenation as a seamless drinking and dining venue, delivering fine local produce & a wide variety of craft beers, ciders & wines.The 'Charo' as its affectionately known; boasts an award winning menu available over multiple spaces throughout the Hotel. With a thriving Public Bar, Cocktail Parlour, Bistro Dinning area, daily specials, TAB, state of the art gaming room, beer garden & function spaces this neighbourhood Hotel has once again become a popular part of the local community. Charing Cross is a precinct in the suburb of Waverley, part of eastern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. The name "Charing Cross" is used to describe the intersection of Bronte Road and Carrington Road and the short shopping strip extending to the east along Bronte Road, and is used as a reference point for the homes and schools located around it.
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Port Phillip
Port Phillip is the entrance to Australia's busiest port and is one of Victoria's most popular recreational destinations. Every year millions of people enjoy its vast coastline, world-class swimming beaches and coastal parks. An entirely different perspective however is available to those who explore Port Phillip by boat. Island, shipwrecks and marine reserves dot Port Phillip, while scuba diving and fishing reveal the colourful diversity of Port Phillip's marine life.
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Melbourne Royal Botanic Gardens
Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria is one of the world's leading botanic gardens and a centre of excellence for horticulture, science and education. Melbourne’s Botanic Gardens was established in 1846 by Lieutenant Governor Charles La Trobe. Over the next 60 years this swampy site was transformed into the world-famous landscape we know today. In 1958, Queen Elizabeth II bestowed the ‘Royal’ prefix on the Gardens. Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria is dedicated to the conservation, display and enjoyment of plants and extends over two locations, Melbourne and Cranbourne, and incorporates the National Herbarium of Victoria.
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National Gallery of Victoria
The National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) is the oldest and most visited gallery in Australia. Situated over two magnificent buildings – NGV International and NGV Australia – the Gallery hosts a wide range of international and local artists, exhibitions, programs and events; from contemporary art to major international historic exhibitions, fashion and design, architecture, sound and dance.
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Ballarat Wildlife Park
Founded in February 1985 through a passion for conservation of wildlife and the environment. The Parker family have long realised the value of allowing people and animals to come together in a relaxing, friendly and educational environment. The selection of animals is truly unique and features animals that can only be described as natural wonders of the world.
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Eureka Skydeck 88
Nothing you have ever experienced will prepare you for the awe inspiring views from the highest viewing platform in the Southern Hemisphere at Melbourne's Eureka Skydeck 88. Eureka Skydeck 88 is Melbourne's must see attraction. Two dedicated lifts propel visitors to level 88 in under 40 seconds. Only Skydeck 88 can take you to The Edge, a switchable glass cube which slides out from the building, with you inside. Apart from the unforgettable panorama, Skydeck 88 entertains the entire family with a host of activities and fascinating facts. Located in Southbank, Eureka Skydeck 88 will change the way you look at Melbourne and beyond.
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Churchill Island Heritage Farm
Experience a piece of Victoria’s heritage on this historic island, where you can enjoy a relaxing stroll through the fragrant cottage gardens and lawns. Coastline walks offer magnificent views of Phillip Island and Western Port, while the restored farmhouse and cottages provide a glimpse into the past lives of early Australian settlers and past farming practices. Churchill Island, just off the coast of Phillip Island holds an important place in the history of European settlement in Victoria. The site of the first European agricultural pursuits in Victoria, the island has been farmed since the 1850’s and in 1872 was purchased by Samuel Amess, former Mayor of Melbourne. This tiny island of 57 hectares is now open to the public as an historic working farm that boasts significant natural and cultural values with world-class wetlands, ancient Moonah trees, heritage gardens and historic buildings.
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Puffing Billy Railway
The journey aboard Puffing Billy takes you through the magnificent Dandenong Ranges, located only one hour east of Melbourne. With lush fern gullies brushing past and Mountain Ash trees towering overhead, Puffing Billy makes for a wonderful opportunity to relax and breathe in the fresh air whilst the train makes its way through the temperate rainforest.
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