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Things to do in Amalfi Coast

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Amalfi Cathedral
Amalfi Cathedral is a 9th-century Roman Catholic structure in the Piazza del Duomo, Amalfi, Italy. It is dedicated to the Apostle Saint Andrew. Predominantly of Arab-Norman Romanesque architectural style, it has been remodelled several times, adding Romanesque, Byzantine, Gothic, and Baroque elements. The cathedral includes the adjoining 9th-century Basilica of the Crucifix. Leading from the basilica are steps into the Crypt of St. Andrew. A wooden 13th-century Crucifix hangs in the liturgical area. Another crucifix, made of mother-of-pearl, was brought from the Holy Land and is located to the right of the back door. The High Altar in the central nave is formed from the sarcophagus of the Archbishop Pietro Capuano (died in 1214). Above the altar is a painting by Andrea dell'Asta of The Martyrdom of St. Andrew. The front facade was rebuilt in 1891 after the original one collapsed. It is of striped marble and stone with open arches that have lace detailing not commonly found in Italian sacred architecture while the tiled cupola is quite common amongst churches of the area. The tympanum's mosaics portray “The triumph of Christ” in a work created by Domenico Morelli and whose original designs are retained in the Town Hall.
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Path of the Gods
The Path of the Gods links Agerola, a small village over the hills of the Amalfi Coast, to Nocelle, a fraction of Positano which is located on the slopes of Monte Pertuso. The name hints at the spectacle of the path: follow it in the direction that goes from Agerola to Nocelle so walking slightly downhill and get in front of the scenery of the Amalfi Coast and Capri. The Path of the Gods starts from Bomerano, fraction of Agerola. To reach Agerola there are Sita buses leaving from Amalfi, ask the driver for the stop Bomerano. From there follow the road signs that will take you at the entrance of the path. The Path of the Gods can also be reached from Praiano but you have to face a long flight of steps to go from sea level to 580 meters high to the pass of Colle Serra.
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Cathedral of Ravello
Built in the 11th century with support from the Rufolo family, the Duomo is a combination of Baroque and Romanesque styles. Dedicated to St. Pantaleone, the church has undergone extensive modifications and restorations over the past 900 years. The Duomo’s shining white façade dates back to the last major restoration in 1931. The Duomo’s bell tower, which dates back to the 13th century, shows Moorish and Byzantine influence. Today, the Duomo is primarily remembered for five attractions: The first is the bronze door, which was temporarily removed for restoration in 2010. Constructed in 1179 by Barisano da Trani, the door is of special interest because fewer than two dozen bronze church doors are still extant in Italy, three of them by Trani. The second item of special note is the pulpit, which is supported by six spiraled columns sitting atop marble lions. Across from the pulpit, to the left, is the Ambo of the Epistles that boasts two wonderful mosaics of Jonah and the Whale. The fourth area of special interest is the Chapel of St. Pantaleone the Healer, a 3rd century physician who was beheaded, on orders of the Emperor Diocletian, after he converted to Christianity. The Chapel has a small ampoule of the saint’s blood, which is said to liquefy every year on July 27th, the anniversary of his martyrdom. The chapel also has a silver bust of the town’s venerated saint. The final attraction is the cathedral's museum, which is accessible through a side entrance on the Via Richard Wagner.
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Cilento and Vallo di Diano National Park
Cilento e Vallo di Diano National Park is the second-largest park in Italy. It stretches from the Tyrrhenian coast to the foot of the Apennines in Campania and Basilicata, and it includes the peaks of Alburni Mountains, Cervati and Gelbison and the coastal buttresses of Mt. Bulgheria and Mt. Stella. The extraordinary naturalistic richness of the heterogeneous territory goes hand in hand with the mythical and mysterious character of a land rich in history and culture: from the call of the nymph Leucosia to the beaches where Palinuro left Aeneas, from the ruins of the Greek colonies of Elea and Paestum to the wonderful Certosa of Padula. And everything else you can find in such an unexplored territory. The National Park of Cilento and Vallo di Diano houses many animal species. Their undisputed queen is undoubtedly the golden eagle that nests on the highest peaks. But other birds fly over the territory of the Park, including peregrine falcons, buzzards, sparrow hawk, owl and the owl. The territory is also inhabited by wolves, wild boars, foxes, martens, badgers, weasels and other mammals that bear witness to the progressive enrichment of the ecosystem of the Park of Cilento.
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Villa Cimbrone
Sitting high atop a promontory that offers stunning views of the Mediterranean and the dramatic coastline below, the Villa Cimbrone is the crown laurel of Ravello. Its origins date back to the 11th century, but the villa and the gardens were extensively renovated by a British nobleman, Lord Grimthorpe, in the early 20th century. With its expansive gardens and dramatic views, the villa is a popular place for weddings, honeymoons, and receptions. The villa is a private 5-star hotel (Hotel Villa Cimbrone), but the gardens are open to the public and it ranks, perhaps, as the most memorable sight on the Amalfi Coast. A century ago, shortly after it was renovated by Grimthorpe, the Villa Cimbrone became a popular retreat for London’s famed Bloomsbury Group, a circle of early 20th century intellectuals that featured Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey. Other noted guests, included Winston Churchill, author E.M Forster, and famed economist Maynard Keynes. D.H. Lawrence, the author of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, literally left his mark on the villa’s garden, when he and a friend decided to give the Statue of Eve a fresh, and unauthorized, coat of paint.
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Villa Rufolo
Built by a wealthy merchant family in the 13th century, the villa has a rich and storied past. Boccaccio, one of the earliest authors of the Italian renaissance, wrote a story about the villa and its owner in his Decameron, which was published in 1353. In its prime, it was one of the largest and most expensive villas on the Amalfi Coast, and legends grew about hidden treasure on its premises. In the 14th century, the Rufolo family hosted banquets for King Robert II of Naples and other Norman royalty. The gardens and grounds of the Villa Rufolo are open year around and attract visitors from all over the world. Juxtaposed against the sea, the sky, umbrella pines, and the Church of the Annunziata below, the gardens, with their profusion of flowers, have a magical quality to them.
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Amalfi Paper Museum
Among the first towns where it was discovered in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries the existence of the paper, if you want to take for granted the information contained in notarial deeds discussing of the existence of paper products, while not specifying whether these were imported from other places and traded in the above-mentioned places, there were the territories of the Maritime Republics: Amalfi, Pisa, Genoa and Venice who had warehouses both in Syria, both on the coast of Palestine, where they were precisely located the major centres for the production of paper. These republics also had intense trade relations with the East and they could learn from the Eastern art of making paper without too much difficulty, or it is possible that on board the galleys, which in medieval times shuttled between our coasts and the Holy Land to transport crusaders and merchandises, they are embarked "Magisters in art cartarum" which as skilled labour have introduced this type of work. Amalfi is the oldest of the Maritime Republics, as early as the ninth century had its warehouses in Palermo and Messina and Syracuse, where the Amalfitana is still present in local place names. Age-old remains the question on the primacy of paper in Italy and then in Europe and in contention are mainly Amalfi and Fabriano.
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