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WildlifeAreas in San Pedro de Atacama

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Chile
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El Tatio Geysers
Get up before dawn to enjoy the show just as the sun rises, with the craters of El Tatio as the main attraction. Located 4,200 meters above sea level, its fumaroles (smoke from the geysers) create amazing white steam columns which are at their best between 6 and 7 in the morning. On your morning outing see how the local endemic wildlife (viscachas, vicunas, nandues) and other birds leave their hiding spots, looking for their breakfast among the yaretas (fern like plants) and giant cacti. Tired? Finish your day in the healing hot springs that the destination offers.
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Los Flamencos National Reserve
In the enormity of the desert, you’ll find lagoons, salt flats, and mountains that are intertwined with the landscape. Together they create magical sights! The Los Flamencos National Reserve invites you to enjoy the beauty of the landscape around it. The diverse climatic conditions of its seven areas will surprise you as you become one with your surroundings. You can see its variety of flora and fauna where flamingos take center stage. Walk along the trails around the spectacular altiplanic lagoons, discover the Chaxa Tourist Center and see how the sun sets behind Moon Valley (Valle de la Luna).
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Atacama Salt Flat
Center-stage of many surprises, the 3,000 square kilometer salt lake is an unbeatable sight. Home to Andean birds and a large lithium reserve, its thick crust forms heaps that crackle at sundown when temperatures drop quickly. The Atacama Salt Flat is one of the main attractions of the Los Flamencos National Reserve. Be amazed by the large number of long-legged birds that nest and feed in its “watery eyes”, like those of the Chaxa Lagoon. Keep your eyes wide open to try to spot the differences between the Andean, Chilean and James flamingos.
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Sao Paulo Zoo
Since its inauguration in 1958, Sao Paulo Zoo has already attracted more than 70 million visitors. Located at the heart of more than 900,000 m of original Atlantic forest, the grounds are home to 3,000 different animal species, each evolving in a dedicated biotope which closely reflects its natural surroundings. This institution is the ideal tool for increase awareness among the general public of the problems related to protecting the species to which the Amazonian forest is home.
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Roberto Burle Marx Park
Roberto Burle Marx Municipal Park, better known as "Parque da Cidade", located in São José dos Campos - SP, occupies an area of ​​about one million square meters that was part of the former Parahyba Weaving Farm. In this vast perimeter are sheltered a great diversity of plant species and a beautiful landscape composed of gardens, imperial palm trees, lakes, artificial islands, woods and boulevards. The gardens, by Roberto Burle Marx, and the Olivo Gomes Residence, designed by Rino Levi, make up an important work of modern architecture. One of the main attractions of the park is the contact with nature. It provides the user with pleasant walks on paths surrounded by dense vegetation consisting of native and exotic species and inhabited by rich wildlife.
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Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park
Open in 1961, the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park in Alto Paraíso de Goiás, aims to protect a portion of the Brazilian Cerrado. In 2001, the Park was declared a Natural Heritage by Unesco. With almost 66 thousand hectares, it is home to beautiful waterfalls, natural pools and rock formations (some with more than a billion years). It is the brightest point seen from Earth’s orbit, according to Nasa, because of its quartz crystals. Birds are always present: parakeets, toucans, macaws, among others. Wildlife includes armadillos, veados-campeiros, jaguars, among others, and, on the Park’s trails, you can find a diverse flora. The Park’s main attractions are its waterfalls, such as the Prata and Santa Bárbara. The trails (Sete Quedas, dos Saltos, dos Cânions and da Seriema) also attract those who like to walk among nature. Each trail has different degrees of difficulty, ranging from 230 m (track with accessibility) to 23.5 Km.
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Parque das Dunas
Area of environment preservation, it maintains threatened species, being one of the biggest parks of Natal! Parque das Dunas, in Natal, was created in 1977 with an area of 1,172 hectares and it is the first Environment Preservation Unit implemented in the state of Rio Grande do Norte. The Park receives annually around 150 thousand visitors. It has Bosque dos Namorados, where it is possible to walk and do gymnastics. There are also picnic and exhibit areas. The Park has Atlantic forest plant formations and over 270 tree species, such as pau-brasil (Caesalpinia echinata), peroba (Aspidosperma polyneuron), and sucupira (Pterodon emarginatus), as well as bromeliads and orchids. Regarding fauna, it is possible to observe timbu (Didelphis albiventris), gato-maracajá (Leopardus wiedii), foxes, sagui (Callithrix jacchus), jiboia (Boa constrictor), snakes and a large amount of insects.
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Barbados Wildlife Reserve
This is the animal kingdom of Barbados, where you can stroll freely among animals feeding and playing in their natural environment. Here you can see agouti, armadillo, Brocket deer, pelicans, and caimans. Monkeys are most abundant at afternoon feeding time. Reptiles include snakes, iguanas, turtles, and tortoises. parrots, flamingos, and peacocks share the premises, adding bright splashes of colour. Only the more dangerous animals, such as pythons are kept enclosed. Top Tip: Arrive by 2 pm to see the monkeys, especially the babies being fed!
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Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary
Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary (CBWS) is recognized internationally as the world’s first jaguar preserve. It is also known for its spectacular waterfalls, mountain views, nature trails, and rich diversity of neotropical birds. The tracks of wildcats, tapir, deer, and other wildlife are often seen on hiking trails or along the bank of South Stann Creek. Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary is a reservoir for biodiversity. Hundreds of species of plants with exotic leaves and flowers, colorful insects, singing birds, furry mammals, scaly reptiles, and wide-eyed amphibians live in this complex tropical forest community. Each one has a function that serves the community as a whole. Each one is adapted to the conditions that make the community unique. The mosaic of ecosystems in this rugged landscape suggests the limited extent of our knowledge of the Sanctuary’s biodiversity.
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The Belize Zoo
The Belize Zoo was started in 1983, as a last ditch effort to provide a home for a collection of wild animals which had been used in making documentary films about tropical forests. Today, The Belize Zoo and Tropical Education Center exhibits over 175 animals, representing over 45 native species. The Zoo keeps animals which were orphaned, rescued, born at the zoo, rehabilitated animals, or sent to The Belize Zoo as donations from other zoological institutions. A visit to the Zoo is the best way to get an introduction to the animals of Belize, and to understand why it is important to protect the habitats that sustain them. We hope this website will be the next best thing to visiting us in person.
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Guanacaste National Park
Guanacaste National Park (GNP) is a popular getaway, located only two miles from the capital city of Belmopan at the confluence of the Belize River and Roaring Creek. The park’s small size of 50 acres allows visitors to observe wildlife and tropical vegetation readily. At GNP, it is easy to learn about plants and their traditional uses, fungus farming leaf-cutter ants, or the mini-ecosystem inside a bromeliad. Its habitat is known as a secondary broadleaf forest, which benefits many birds and wildlife, including the shy and secretive “tiger cat” or Jaguarundi and Black howler monkeys. Visitors can enjoy various recreational and educational activities throughout the year at GNP. The park provides a picnic area, interpretive displays, two miles of maintained trails, a bird watching deck, and a clean swimming area. It is a perfect environment for a class field trip or family gathering.
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Bivens Arm Nature Park
Bivens Arm Nature Park is 57 acres of marsh and oak hammock with a wildlife sanctuary, shaded family picnic grounds, an observation pavilion and a mile-long nature trail with a 1,200 foot boardwalk. The wetlands and creeks bordered by beautiful upland mixed forests is a true natural treasure. The Park connects the southernmost Gainesville creeks to the wetlands of Paynes Prairie State Preserve. The park’s trail meanders through uplands past numerous large live oaks, while the boardwalk and main pavilion border a small marsh. Birders especially enjoy the Bivens Arm Nature Park, where wading birds, including great blue herons, little blue herons, cattle egrets, great egrets and snowy egrets can be seen. You will also see purple gallinules, common moorhens, and a variety of native turtles. You may hear barred owls or great horned owls, and in April and October you may see migratory songbirds such as hermit thrushes and American redstarts.
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Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center
A 103-acre facility dedicated to conservation, education, recreation and tourism. It houses an award-winning, 9500-square-foot building filled with live animal exhibits; photographic presentations of the site's flora and fauna; natural artefact and mineral displays; and a sizeable, vintage waterfowl decoy carving collection. Ecology and art exhibits are featured periodically. Over a mile of gravel paths and boardwalks link varied habitats such as the cypress-tupelo swamp, beech-magnolia and hardwood forests. Wildlife is plentiful at Bluebonnet Swamp, including hundreds of bird species utilizing the site throughout the year. Birders can view seasonal species during peak migrations, as well as year-round residents. While snakes and turtles are commonly seen from the trails, raccoons, rabbits, opossums, armadillos, squirrels, foxes, coyotes, deer and otter are also known to inhabit the site. Nature programs and environmental education are conducted throughout the year including educational group tours, live animal encounters, holiday and summer day camps, toddler activities, birding walks, field trips and special events.
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McKinney Falls State Park
McKinney Falls is a 641-acre park features over 80 campsites, including developed (RV) and hike-in sites. Screened shelters, group shelters and a group dining hall are also available. Outdoor recreation opportunities include hiking, mountain biking, bicycling, swimming, birding and wildlife observation. Onion Creek, which flows 1.7 miles through the park, offers both swimming and fishing opportunities.
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Tacugama Chimpanzee Sanctuary
Tacugama Chimpanzee Sanctuary situated outside of picturesque Regent Village is only 30 minutes from Freetown. Located along the Regent/Bathurst mountain road, this sanctuary for orphaned and habituated chimpanzees is a refuge for human visitors as well. Offering daily scheduled visits, as well as 6 eco-huts for overnight stays, Tacugama is the perfect place for those wishing to escape the heat and hustle of Freetown and enjoy fragrant forest breezes in the company of some extraordinary creatures. The Sanctuary now offers self-catering accommodation in the form of 6 beautifully crafted lodges. Established to rescue orphaned and captured chimps, the facilities expanded to encompass two large reserves. Tacugama has been featured in various wildlife programmes and magazines. A rescued albino chimp at the sanctuary also helped to bring it to international attention. Sadly, the albino chimp is no longer alive but the sanctuary continues to grow from strength to strength. These endangered animals share 98.6 per cent of their DNA with humans and their complex social behaviours and human-like tendencies are fascinating to behold. The story behind Tacugama is just as riveting. Established in 1995, this sanctuary, which covers 100 acres of rain-forest and watershed, is home to 90 chimpanzees that have been victimized by the illegal hunting, capturing, and selling of their species. During the conflict, Tacugama staff smuggled food to the chimpanzees and pleaded with the rebels to spare their lives. Don’t miss the extraordinary experience of viewing these intelligent beings up-close in their natural habitat.
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Bronx Zoo
The Bronx Zoo of the Wildlife Conservation Society is the premier place to study and appreciate the world's many creatures. Home to more than 6,000 animals, the zoo spans 265 acres that re-create the diverse natural habitats of its numerous residents. Open year-round, it’s a great experience in any season. During the winter, be sure to stop by Tiger Mountain or Himalayan Highlands to see big cats enjoying the chilly outdoors—then head to World of Reptiles or JungleWorld for a warm up with tropical wildlife.
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El Paso Zoo
Locally recognized as the Best Place to Take the Kiddos, the El Paso Zoo sits on 35 acres of fun and adventure. Bigger and better than ever, the El Paso Zoo is an expansive green space that is home to exotic animals from around the world and features family attractions such as the African Star Train and the Hunt Family Desert Spring water feature and the Foster Tree House Playground. Accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA), the El Paso Zoo celebrates the value of animals and natural resources and creates opportunities for people to rediscover their connection to nature.
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McLaughlin Bay Wildlife Reserve
McLaughlin Bay Wildlife Reserve is named after the automakers' founder, Col. Sam McLaughlin, the Reserve has become a popular attraction for lovers of nature and peaceful surroundings. The Reserve occupies in excess of 41 ha (108 acres) of land owned and operated by General Motors of Canada Limited. An additional 40 ha of the same tract has been set aside for the office complex, parking and services, along with adequate buffer zones. Home to almost 400 different varieties of plants, trees, shrubs and wildflowers, as well as a great number of native birds, mammals and fish, the McLaughlin Bay Wildlife Reserve features a number of walking trails, viewing platforms for photographers and birdwatchers as well as the Dogwood Trail, for use by partially-sighted or visually-impaired visitors. It is open to the public seven days a week, year-round, free of charge, and is wheel-chair accessible. A series of 11 trails in network of McLaughlin Bay Wildlife Reserve - connected to Second Marsh Wildlife Area and Darlington Provincial Park - part of provincial waterfront system.
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Veterans Oasis Park and Environmental Education Center
Chandler unveiled another dynamic, mixed-use facility in April 2008 with the Veterans Oasis Park and Environmental Education Center located in the northeast corner of the city at the intersection of Lindsay and Chandler Heights Roads. The center includes four classrooms for wildlife preservation and environmental awareness, exhibit areas, outdoor amphitheatre, nature store and an urban fishing lake, all surrounded by more than four miles of trails. A primary purpose of the facility is to recharge reclaimed water into the ground for later use. The staff works with local schools to develop nature-oriented activities that complement their curriculum. Programs offered for residents and visitors cover topics such as birdwatching, green living, gardening, water conservation, nature photography, orienteering, alternative energy and stargazing. Entrance to the Environmental Education Center is free and visitors are welcome to view the exhibits and walk the trails around the urban fishing lake.
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Lake Laurentian Conservation Area
The Lake Laurentian Conservation Area is a scenic natural area located only ten minutes from downtown Sudbury. Easily accessible by car, the area offers 2,415 acres (950 hectares) of protected green space. Imagine the remote tranquility of a wilderness setting, a man-made lake and pond, scenic lookouts, a self-guided nature trail, numerous wetland areas, hiking trails, bird watching areas, and snowshoeing and cross-country ski trails in winter. The Lake Laurentian Conservation Area offers the photographer, nature watcher, and recreationist boundless opportunity to experience the wilds. At Lake Laurentian children can: touch a frog, eat juicy blueberries, feed the birds, learn to survive if lost in the woods, see animal displays or plant a tree. The Lake Laurentian Conservation Area has something for everyone. Providing environmental education for over 40 years, is only one of the many benefits this facility provides.
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Minnesota Zoo
Located just minutes south of Mall of America, the Minnesota Zoo brings education and entertainment to life! The zoo is home to penguins, a lush tropical forest and aviary, marine center, boreal forest, tundra and a family farm. With more than 4,300 animals, you're bound for a new adventure on every visit! The zoo also has banquet facilities and picnic rentals available and group discounts for 20 or more.
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San Diego Zoo
An urban paradise for all ages, the San Diego Zoo is a must-see in Southern California, with more than 4,000 rare & fascinating animals. See giant pandas, Komodo dragons, orangutans, koalas, flamingos, polar bears, and more. With animal encounters, interactive experiences, and a lively atmosphere, it's a great place for family fun and gathering friends.
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Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area
Think there’s no wide-open countryside left in Los Angeles? Think again. The Santa Monica Mountains stretch for 80km across the northwestern boundary of the Los Angeles basin. Within the range lie more than 60,000 largely undeveloped hectares of grassy swales, rock-studded hillsides, tree-shaded glens, and windswept beaches. A mosaic of state, local, and federal preserves protects this land, all managed under the umbrella of Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, the nation’s largest urban national park. One of the few mountain ranges in the United States to run east to west rather than north to south, the Santa Monicas can claim big nature bragging rights. Considered to be a “botanical island” in L.A.’s urban corridor, the slopes that run straight down to the Pacific are covered in chaparral, coastal sage, springtime wildflowers, and oak and sycamore forests. More than 20 species of endangered plants and animals thrive here. This is a place where you might see a bobcat stalk its prey, a coyote lope across the grasslands, or a golden eagle fly overhead.
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Penguins at Boulders Beach
The beautiful Boulders Beach is one of Cape Town’s most visited beaches and the only place in the world where you get close to African Penguins. Cape Town definitely has no shortage of amazing beaches, but Boulders Beach in False Bay offers something extra special – a colony of African Penguins in all their smartly dresses, waddling glory, right under your nose. In fact, it’s the only place in the world where you can get close to African Penguins. In 1982 a couple of these little crowd-pleasers settled on the soft white sand between the large granite boulders that protect the beach from wind and large, stormy waves, and currently the population is estimated between 2,000 and 3,000 birds. Sadly the African Penguin has been classified as an endangered species, due to things like overfishing, habitat destruction, pollution, and irresponsible tourism activities, and the Boulders Beach colony has also felt the effect, with numbers dwindling over the last couple of years. Boulders Beach isn’t just a great place for penguins, it’s also a popular family-friendly swimming beach where kids can climb over the boulders, explore the rock pools, or swim in the cool, clear False Bay water. It’s also a great place for a leisurely picnic. Due to the R65 conservation fee, the beach is rarely packed.
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Fortwhyte Alive
Six hundred-forty acres of pristine prairie beauty are waiting to welcome you to this natural oasis, which is located right inside the city. In the summer feel the wind in your hair canoeing or sailing on one of FortWhyte’s several lakes; in the fall sip a locally brewed beer on their restaurant patio while witnessing North America’s largest animal (the bison) roam in its natural habitat as migrating birds fill the sky; in winter go cross country skiing on their many trails or take the kids out for a ridiculously fun day of sliding on the Richardson Rrrun Toboggan slide. No matter what the season, there is always an adventure to be had at FortWhyte Alive.
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Golden Gate Park
Golden Gate Park is the third most visited park in the United States. While the park is free to visit during the day, popular attractions charge admission, such as deYoung Museum, California Academy of Sciences and Conservatory of Flowers. The park is filled with gardens, museums, art, flowers, trees, lakes, birds and wildlife. There are also plenty of opportunities to participate in sports, clubs and other activities. Browse the site for information on parking, maps, weddings, hotels, permits, making reservations, transportation, contact numbers, and the history of Golden Gate Park.
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Muir Woods
Walk among old growth coast redwoods, cooling their roots in the freshwater of Redwood Creek and lifting their crowns to reach the sun and fog. Federally protected as a National Monument since 1908, this primeval forest is both refuge and laboratory, revealing our relationship with the living landscape. Muir Woods National Monument is world renowned for its old-growth coastal redwoods, attracting over one million visitors each year. With the park’s popularity come pressures on a fragile ecosystem representing more than 380 different plants and animals. The incredible diversity of flora and fauna at Muir Woods can be daunting sometimes, elusive at other times. The redwoods themselves dominate the scene, but the Steller's jay often steals the show. Ladybugs clustering by the thousands on ancient horsetail ferns boggle the imagination, while the slimy banana slug is able to disgust and fascinate all at once. Plants adapt to low light levels on the forest floor, while whole plant and animal communities bustle in the canopy above our heads.
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Inglewood Bird Sanctuary
This 36-hectare wildlife reserve is visited by more than 270 species of birds, 21 species of mammals (including deer), 2 amphibians, 2 reptiles, 7 species of fish and 27 species of butterflies. The sanctuary is a short drive (5 km) east of downtown on the Bow River. It offers two kilometres of trails through open grasslands and forests. Trails are open from dawn to dusk every day of the year. Bring your binoculars and be ready to spot the Mourning Warbler, the Western-Wood Pewee and – if you're lucky – the Hairy Woodpecker. A Nature Centre with an exhibit hall is an educational resource for families and wildlife lovers, and records recent sightings in the area.
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Cradle of Humankind
The Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site is an area of outstanding universal value. Its complex of fossil-bearing caves contains a superbly preserved record of the stages in the evolution of humankind over the past 4-million years. It's the world's richest early hominin site and is home to around 40% of the world's known human-ancestor fossils. The area is also home to a diversity of birds, animals and plants, some of which are rare or endangered.
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Croc City Crocodile & Reptile Park
Croc City Crocodile & Reptile Park is fast becoming one of the most exciting attractions in South Africa, where visitors take part in thrilling activities such as holding a baby crocodile, touching exotic snakes and getting up close and personal with a tarantula! Croc City was founded by Anton and Marietjie Lötter over a decade ago; the couple have been there for more than 16 years. The entrepreneurial duo soon discovered a huge tourist market for their industry and one of the founders and co-owner of the reptilian refuge Marietjie Lötter explained that the origin of the animals in the Park and their facilities are exclusively for the benefit of visitors. Croc City Crocodile & Reptile Park’s first Nile Crocodile Zip Line – A revolution for Africa – is turning heads as the brave of heart gear up to brave the new Croc City FlyOver! Built by Chimp and Zee, the Croc City FlyOver is an adrenaline-fuelled opportunity to fly or zip over crocodiles as they watch from below!
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Stanley Park
Welcome to Stanley Park, Vancouver's first, largest, and most beloved urban park! Designated a national historic site of Canada, Stanley Park is a magnificent green oasis in the midst of the heavily built urban landscape of Vancouver. Explore the 400-hectare natural West Coast rainforest and enjoy scenic views of water, mountains, sky, and majestic trees along Stanley Park's famous Seawall. Discover kilometres of trails, beautiful beaches, local wildlife, great eats, natural, cultural and historical landmarks, along with many other adventures. The park offers a wide range of unforgettable experiences for all ages and interests, including Canada’s largest aquarium.
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Dartmoor National Park
Dartmoor National Park is one of the last great wildernesses in the UK with an inspirational landscape of heather-clad moors and rugged tors. Dartmoor was designated as a National Park in 1951, a vast tract of the largely untamed countryside of huge richness and diversity stretching across 368 square miles. It's a landscape quite unlike any other, populated by lofty granite tors, mysterious hut circles and standing stones, ancient woodlands, sturdy clapper bridges, rushing streams, Dartmoor ponies, bustling stannary towns and secluded villages. This unique area has so much to see and do, but first of all, you must experience Dartmoor by actually getting out onto it, the National Park is most easily accessed by car, although there are options by bus if it’s a particular village you would like to see in general there is little public transport on to the moors. Walk, ride, cycle, canoe or even fish once you are on Dartmoor so that you can soak up its very special atmosphere. Another Dartmoor activity that has become very popular with families is letterboxing - you can find out more about this unique activity at the High Moorland Visitor Centre at Princetown. Dartmoor is also a wonderful landscape for you to enjoy Geocaching,
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The Donkey Sanctuary
No trip to Devon is complete without visiting The Donkey Sanctuary. There’s a tranquil corner of the Jurassic Coast near Sidmouth that hundreds of donkeys call home, and they’re all waiting to meet you. This free-to-visit, the award-wining attraction has something special to offer, whether you’re looking for quality time with the kids, or somewhere calming to kick back with coffee and cake. Explore everything the sanctuary has to offer, from award-winning gardens and scenic coast path walks to engaging exhibits and losing yourself in the maze - all year round, whatever the weather. With activities, trails, tours, talks and demonstrations, there’s so much to explore with your own herd. Friendly dogs on leads are welcome too! And there are lots of family events and donkey experiences throughout the year, including overnight camping if you fancy a ‘Bray and Stay’! Take sanctuary in the Taste of the West award-winning restaurant and enjoy fresh, local, seasonal produce while soaking in the unparalleled coast and country views. Hearty breakfasts, luscious lunches and tempting afternoon treats are dished up daily - best served with friends, family and fabulous views.
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Brownsea Island
Brownsea Island is a wildlife sanctuary that’s easy to reach but feels like another world from the moment you step ashore. There is wildlife to spot and woodland to explore; outdoor activities to try and beaches to picnic on; birds to watch and trails to wander. Sample the scouting life at the Outdoor Centre; spend a night under the stars on our Eco Adventure Camping experience, or learn about intriguing tales of survival and adventure at the Trading Post. Wildlife spotters can follow waymarked routes through a wealth of different habitats from the sheltered lagoon and sweeping shorelines, to woodlands and heathland. As you wander, keep an eye out for the famous red squirrel.
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Paradise Valley Springs Wildlife Park
Paradise Valley Springs is Rotorua's must-see wildlife park where visitors of all ages can interact closely with a range of New Zealand’s wild animals, native birds, farm animals and trout, as well as view and get up close to a large pride of African Lions. The wildlife park is set amongst beautifully maintained New Zealand native bush, offering easy walking along flat accessible walkways in all types of weather. You can hand-feed animals that are found wild around the country such as Deer, Goats, Tahr and Wallabies. Visit the Kea, New Zealand’s infamous and comical alpine parrot in their walk-through aviary. Stroll through the waterbird wetland for great views of native and introduced waterfowl, and look out for the different native birds living wild around the park. Pat and feed the very sociable farm animals - alpacas, donkey, emus, sheep and more. Hundreds of Rainbow and Brown trout can be fed in the natural stream as well as in the spring-fed display pools, and viewed at eye level through an underwater window below their pool. Spot some of the large native long-finned eels lazing in their pools. Drink straight from the cool waters of the freshwater spring, or purchase some of their bottled ‘Paradise Pure’ to take away with you. Take the elevated treetops to walk in a secluded area, putting you up near the canopy of the trees. In a separate area of the park, there is also a pride of African Lions that can be seen all day in an enclosure that allows visitors to get very close to these wild animals. Lion pride feeding is at 2.30pm, followed by kea and possum feeding at 3pm every day. 10-15 minutes drive from central Rotorua. Open every day of the year including all public holidays.
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Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary
While staying at Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary, a 16-acre nature park, feed the unique Mount Tutu Sheep which are a closed flock of Heritage Sheep. The preservation of heritage flocks is considered to be very important. Mount Tutu Sheep, unique to Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary, are characterised by their majestic horns and piebald markings. They have been selectively bred over 18 years. The lambs look like little panda bears, and are equally as cuddly! Get up close and personal with these special sheep!