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Wildlife Areas in Honolulu

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Honolulu Zoo
The Honolulu Zoo is 42 lush tropical acres of mammals, reptiles, birds and more! A children's zoo, African Savannah exhibit, playground and snack bar complete the visit. The Zoo is 42 acres and home to almost 1000 different animals from the tropics. Komodo Dragons, orangutans, elephants, primates, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and a variety of African animals can be seen daily. Be sure to see the wildest place in Waikiki!
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Muir Woods
Walk among old growth coast redwoods, cooling their roots in the freshwater of Redwood Creek and lifting their crowns to reach the sun and fog. Federally protected as a National Monument since 1908, this primeval forest is both refuge and laboratory, revealing our relationship with the living landscape. Muir Woods National Monument is world renowned for its old-growth coastal redwoods, attracting over one million visitors each year. With the park’s popularity come pressures on a fragile ecosystem representing more than 380 different plants and animals. The incredible diversity of flora and fauna at Muir Woods can be daunting sometimes, elusive at other times. The redwoods themselves dominate the scene, but the Steller's jay often steals the show. Ladybugs clustering by the thousands on ancient horsetail ferns boggle the imagination, while the slimy banana slug is able to disgust and fascinate all at once. Plants adapt to low light levels on the forest floor, while whole plant and animal communities bustle in the canopy above our heads.
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Golden Gate Park
Golden Gate Park is the third most visited park in the United States. While the park is free to visit during the day, popular attractions charge admission, such as deYoung Museum, California Academy of Sciences and Conservatory of Flowers. The park is filled with gardens, museums, art, flowers, trees, lakes, birds and wildlife. There are also plenty of opportunities to participate in sports, clubs and other activities. Browse the site for information on parking, maps, weddings, hotels, permits, making reservations, transportation, contact numbers, and the history of Golden Gate Park.
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Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area
Think there’s no wide-open countryside left in Los Angeles? Think again. The Santa Monica Mountains stretch for 80km across the northwestern boundary of the Los Angeles basin. Within the range lie more than 60,000 largely undeveloped hectares of grassy swales, rock-studded hillsides, tree-shaded glens, and windswept beaches. A mosaic of state, local, and federal preserves protects this land, all managed under the umbrella of Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, the nation’s largest urban national park. One of the few mountain ranges in the United States to run east to west rather than north to south, the Santa Monicas can claim big nature bragging rights. Considered to be a “botanical island” in L.A.’s urban corridor, the slopes that run straight down to the Pacific are covered in chaparral, coastal sage, springtime wildflowers, and oak and sycamore forests. More than 20 species of endangered plants and animals thrive here. This is a place where you might see a bobcat stalk its prey, a coyote lope across the grasslands, or a golden eagle fly overhead.
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San Diego Zoo
An urban paradise for all ages, the San Diego Zoo is a must-see in Southern California, with more than 4,000 rare & fascinating animals. See giant pandas, Komodo dragons, orangutans, koalas, flamingos, polar bears, and more. With animal encounters, interactive experiences, and a lively atmosphere, it's a great place for family fun and gathering friends.
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Stanley Park
Welcome to Stanley Park, Vancouver's first, largest, and most beloved urban park! Designated a national historic site of Canada, Stanley Park is a magnificent green oasis in the midst of the heavily built urban landscape of Vancouver. Explore the 400-hectare natural West Coast rainforest and enjoy scenic views of water, mountains, sky, and majestic trees along Stanley Park's famous Seawall. Discover kilometres of trails, beautiful beaches, local wildlife, great eats, natural, cultural and historical landmarks, along with many other adventures. The park offers a wide range of unforgettable experiences for all ages and interests, including Canada’s largest aquarium.
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Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center
At the 200-acre Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center, jaws drop in awe-even those of longtime Alaskans who've studied grizzlies and other animals up close. AWCC's mission is to preserve Alaska’s wildlife through conservation, research, education and quality animal care. The center, which opened to the public in 1993, also educates visitors about Alaska's wildlife. Coyotes peer out from behind the brush while a bald eagle swoops in on the salmon remains left by a grizzly bear. Wood Bison plod through 65 acres of tidal flat terrain, as part of a program that will one day restore the species to the Alaskan wilderness. Animals that cannot be released into the wild are given a permanent home at the center. Come be a part of these exciting programs and watch these animals display their natural, “wild”, behaviour. Set on the shores of Turnagain Arm, surrounded by mountains and hanging glaciers, the center is the perfect setting to learn about Alaskan wildlife. The animals are located in different areas grouped around several road loops. Perhaps the best way to view the facility is to first drive around to get your bearings, then park by the gift shop and walk. Each habitat area has a sign explaining the history and habits of the particular animals.
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Admiralty Island
No trip to Alaska is complete without bears. Just twenty minutes from Juneau by floatplane is Admiralty Island, home to one of the world's highest density brown bear populations. Nicknamed “Fortress of the Bears,” there are approximately 1,600 bears — one for every square mile of the island. The most popular place to see these big, fuzzy creatures in action is Pack Creek Bear Sanctuary. Watch bears feed on salmon during the peak viewing season (July through August). In addition to bear viewing, you might spot seabirds, harbor seals, sea lions, whales, Sitka black-tail deer, or sea otters. The island is also home to the world’s greatest concentration of nesting bald eagles.
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Juneau Whale Watching
Hop on a boat for a classic Alaska whale watching adventure. At the right time of year, you’re bound to see humpbacks and orcas congregate in the calm waters and put on a show. See them flip their tails above water or breach (when they leap all the way out of the water and then splash back down). With luck, you’ll get the breathtaking sight of bubble net feeding—a unique technique used by humpback whales circling and blowing bubbles to bring fish to the surface of the water when they spontaneously swim upward together. The best time to whale watch is from April to November, when approximately 600 humpbacks inhabit the waters of the northern Inside Passage. Whale watching tours are offered in Juneau and near Glacier Bay. The orca, or killer whale, is also common to Juneau. But our Shamu doesn't jump through hoops like he does at Sea World. These whales, though much smaller than humpbacks, have been known to pursue seals, moose, and even other whales.
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Veterans Oasis Park and Environmental Education Center
Chandler unveiled another dynamic, mixed-use facility in April 2008 with the Veterans Oasis Park and Environmental Education Center located in the northeast corner of the city at the intersection of Lindsay and Chandler Heights Roads. The center includes four classrooms for wildlife preservation and environmental awareness, exhibit areas, outdoor amphitheatre, nature store and an urban fishing lake, all surrounded by more than four miles of trails. A primary purpose of the facility is to recharge reclaimed water into the ground for later use. The staff works with local schools to develop nature-oriented activities that complement their curriculum. Programs offered for residents and visitors cover topics such as birdwatching, green living, gardening, water conservation, nature photography, orienteering, alternative energy and stargazing. Entrance to the Environmental Education Center is free and visitors are welcome to view the exhibits and walk the trails around the urban fishing lake.
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Inglewood Bird Sanctuary
This 36-hectare wildlife reserve is visited by more than 270 species of birds, 21 species of mammals (including deer), 2 amphibians, 2 reptiles, 7 species of fish and 27 species of butterflies. The sanctuary is a short drive (5 km) east of downtown on the Bow River. It offers two kilometres of trails through open grasslands and forests. Trails are open from dawn to dusk every day of the year. Bring your binoculars and be ready to spot the Mourning Warbler, the Western-Wood Pewee and – if you're lucky – the Hairy Woodpecker. A Nature Centre with an exhibit hall is an educational resource for families and wildlife lovers, and records recent sightings in the area.
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El Paso Zoo
Locally recognized as the Best Place to Take the Kiddos, the El Paso Zoo sits on 35 acres of fun and adventure. Bigger and better than ever, the El Paso Zoo is an expansive green space that is home to exotic animals from around the world and features family attractions such as the African Star Train and the Hunt Family Desert Spring water feature and the Foster Tree House Playground. Accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA), the El Paso Zoo celebrates the value of animals and natural resources and creates opportunities for people to rediscover their connection to nature.
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McKinney Falls State Park
McKinney Falls is a 641-acre park features over 80 campsites, including developed (RV) and hike-in sites. Screened shelters, group shelters and a group dining hall are also available. Outdoor recreation opportunities include hiking, mountain biking, bicycling, swimming, birding and wildlife observation. Onion Creek, which flows 1.7 miles through the park, offers both swimming and fishing opportunities.
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Fortwhyte Alive
Six hundred-forty acres of pristine prairie beauty are waiting to welcome you to this natural oasis, which is located right inside the city. In the summer feel the wind in your hair canoeing or sailing on one of FortWhyte’s several lakes; in the fall sip a locally brewed beer on their restaurant patio while witnessing North America’s largest animal (the bison) roam in its natural habitat as migrating birds fill the sky; in winter go cross country skiing on their many trails or take the kids out for a ridiculously fun day of sliding on the Richardson Rrrun Toboggan slide. No matter what the season, there is always an adventure to be had at FortWhyte Alive.
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Fukushimagata Wetlands
Fukushimagata Wetlands is a vast nature reserve stretching over 193 hectares. It is home to a number of endangered species of animals and plants and is listed on Japan’s 100 greatest natural environments. The park is a paradise for bird and plant lovers. In spring, the carpet of rapeseed flowers is impressive. Indulge yourself in the vivid yellow colour and scent of the flowers while listening to birds singing. In summer, giant pink lotus flowers are in bloom. The rarely seen Euryale ferox, a massive lotus with two-metre leaves and thorns, can be found here. In winter, the snowy scene of the wetlands with migratory swans is a favourite. Along with flocks of swans, the greatest concentration of Eastern Taiga Bean geese, a recognised national natural treasure, resides here. Fukushimagata Wetlands is also designated as a wildlife sanctuary for the Japanese white crucian carp.
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Jigokudani Monkey Park
The Jigokudani Monkey Park (Jigokudani Yaen Kōen) offers visitors the unique experience of seeing wild monkeys bathing in a natural hot spring. The park is inhabited by Japanese Macaques, which are also known as Snow Monkeys. Visitors will likely already encounter monkeys along the path to the pool. The monkeys live in large social groups, and it can be quite entertaining to watch their interactions. Accustomed to humans, the monkeys can be observed from very close and almost completely ignore their human guests.
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Minnesota Zoo
Located just minutes south of Mall of America, the Minnesota Zoo brings education and entertainment to life! The zoo is home to penguins, a lush tropical forest and aviary, marine center, boreal forest, tundra and a family farm. With more than 4,300 animals, you're bound for a new adventure on every visit! The zoo also has banquet facilities and picnic rentals available and group discounts for 20 or more.
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Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center
A 103-acre facility dedicated to conservation, education, recreation and tourism. It houses an award-winning, 9500-square-foot building filled with live animal exhibits; photographic presentations of the site's flora and fauna; natural artefact and mineral displays; and a sizeable, vintage waterfowl decoy carving collection. Ecology and art exhibits are featured periodically. Over a mile of gravel paths and boardwalks link varied habitats such as the cypress-tupelo swamp, beech-magnolia and hardwood forests. Wildlife is plentiful at Bluebonnet Swamp, including hundreds of bird species utilizing the site throughout the year. Birders can view seasonal species during peak migrations, as well as year-round residents. While snakes and turtles are commonly seen from the trails, raccoons, rabbits, opossums, armadillos, squirrels, foxes, coyotes, deer and otter are also known to inhabit the site. Nature programs and environmental education are conducted throughout the year including educational group tours, live animal encounters, holiday and summer day camps, toddler activities, birding walks, field trips and special events.
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Port Moresby Nature Park
The Port Moresby Nature Park is a haven of greenery and lawns spread over 30 acres, boasting two kilometres of boardwalk threading beneath a jungle canopy, plus excellent wildlife exhibits, plant collections, and cultural demonstrations. You may find yourself passing by a wedding, a friendly soccer match and a class trip all in one single visit to the park. Bring a picnic to enjoy in the large grounds, under a 'haus-win' with a barbecue area. Or rest a while in the Park’s well-appointed and popular café before browsing the souvenir shop as you leave. Port Moresby Nature Park is open 365 days a year!
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Ambury Regional Park
Ambury farm park lies among the southern suburbs fronting the Manukau Harbour. Take in the various farm animals as you wander around the open pasture. Ambury is a significant habitat for shorebirds and the coast has excellent examples of basalt lava flows.
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Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary
While staying at Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary, a 16-acre nature park, feed the unique Mount Tutu Sheep which are a closed flock of Heritage Sheep. The preservation of heritage flocks is considered to be very important. Mount Tutu Sheep, unique to Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary, are characterised by their majestic horns and piebald markings. They have been selectively bred over 18 years. The lambs look like little panda bears, and are equally as cuddly! Get up close and personal with these special sheep!
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Paradise Valley Springs Wildlife Park
Paradise Valley Springs is Rotorua's must-see wildlife park where visitors of all ages can interact closely with a range of New Zealand’s wild animals, native birds, farm animals and trout, as well as view and get up close to a large pride of African Lions. The wildlife park is set amongst beautifully maintained New Zealand native bush, offering easy walking along flat accessible walkways in all types of weather. You can hand-feed animals that are found wild around the country such as Deer, Goats, Tahr and Wallabies. Visit the Kea, New Zealand’s infamous and comical alpine parrot in their walk-through aviary. Stroll through the waterbird wetland for great views of native and introduced waterfowl, and look out for the different native birds living wild around the park. Pat and feed the very sociable farm animals - alpacas, donkey, emus, sheep and more. Hundreds of Rainbow and Brown trout can be fed in the natural stream as well as in the spring-fed display pools, and viewed at eye level through an underwater window below their pool. Spot some of the large native long-finned eels lazing in their pools. Drink straight from the cool waters of the freshwater spring, or purchase some of their bottled ‘Paradise Pure’ to take away with you. Take the elevated treetops to walk in a secluded area, putting you up near the canopy of the trees. In a separate area of the park, there is also a pride of African Lions that can be seen all day in an enclosure that allows visitors to get very close to these wild animals. Lion pride feeding is at 2.30pm, followed by kea and possum feeding at 3pm every day. 10-15 minutes drive from central Rotorua. Open every day of the year including all public holidays.
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Guanacaste National Park
Guanacaste National Park (GNP) is a popular getaway, located only two miles from the capital city of Belmopan at the confluence of the Belize River and Roaring Creek. The park’s small size of 50 acres allows visitors to observe wildlife and tropical vegetation readily. At GNP, it is easy to learn about plants and their traditional uses, fungus farming leaf-cutter ants, or the mini-ecosystem inside a bromeliad. Its habitat is known as a secondary broadleaf forest, which benefits many birds and wildlife, including the shy and secretive “tiger cat” or Jaguarundi and Black howler monkeys. Visitors can enjoy various recreational and educational activities throughout the year at GNP. The park provides a picnic area, interpretive displays, two miles of maintained trails, a bird watching deck, and a clean swimming area. It is a perfect environment for a class field trip or family gathering.
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Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary
Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary (CBWS) is recognized internationally as the world’s first jaguar preserve. It is also known for its spectacular waterfalls, mountain views, nature trails, and rich diversity of neotropical birds. The tracks of wildcats, tapir, deer, and other wildlife are often seen on hiking trails or along the bank of South Stann Creek. Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary is a reservoir for biodiversity. Hundreds of species of plants with exotic leaves and flowers, colorful insects, singing birds, furry mammals, scaly reptiles, and wide-eyed amphibians live in this complex tropical forest community. Each one has a function that serves the community as a whole. Each one is adapted to the conditions that make the community unique. The mosaic of ecosystems in this rugged landscape suggests the limited extent of our knowledge of the Sanctuary’s biodiversity.
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The Belize Zoo
The Belize Zoo was started in 1983, as a last ditch effort to provide a home for a collection of wild animals which had been used in making documentary films about tropical forests. Today, The Belize Zoo and Tropical Education Center exhibits over 175 animals, representing over 45 native species. The Zoo keeps animals which were orphaned, rescued, born at the zoo, rehabilitated animals, or sent to The Belize Zoo as donations from other zoological institutions. A visit to the Zoo is the best way to get an introduction to the animals of Belize, and to understand why it is important to protect the habitats that sustain them. We hope this website will be the next best thing to visiting us in person.
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Lake Laurentian Conservation Area
The Lake Laurentian Conservation Area is a scenic natural area located only ten minutes from downtown Sudbury. Easily accessible by car, the area offers 2,415 acres (950 hectares) of protected green space. Imagine the remote tranquility of a wilderness setting, a man-made lake and pond, scenic lookouts, a self-guided nature trail, numerous wetland areas, hiking trails, bird watching areas, and snowshoeing and cross-country ski trails in winter. The Lake Laurentian Conservation Area offers the photographer, nature watcher, and recreationist boundless opportunity to experience the wilds. At Lake Laurentian children can: touch a frog, eat juicy blueberries, feed the birds, learn to survive if lost in the woods, see animal displays or plant a tree. The Lake Laurentian Conservation Area has something for everyone. Providing environmental education for over 40 years, is only one of the many benefits this facility provides.
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Australian Butterfly Sanctuary
The Australian Butterfly Sanctuary has been in operation for over 20 years and is the largest butterfly flight aviary in Australia. More than one million guests have enjoyed the Australian Butterfly Sanctuary since its inception. Come experience why the Australian Butterfly Sanctuary has been such a long lasting success. The aviary at the Australian Butterfly Sanctuary has been designed to recreate the butterfly's natural tropical habitat. Enjoy the tranquility of the flowing fresh water streams, complete with waterfalls and surrounded by exotic tropical plants and flowers. This is the perfect natural haven for the spectacular butterflies. As you wander along the large paths that snake through the aviary take time to appreciate the vast variety of Lepidoptera (species of butterflies and moths). The Australian Butterfly Sanctuary is also home to the world’s largest moth – the Hercules Moth. The Hercules Moth is endemic to Tropical North Queensland Australia and is a majestic creature of the jungle that really has to be seen to be believed! The Australian Butterfly Sanctuary is an all weather activity, perfect for rainy days typical of the tropics. For guests that want to gain a greater appreciation for butterflies 30 minute complimentary tours are conducted every 15 minutes, providing visitors with a greater understanding of the butterflies life cycle and behaviour.
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Bivens Arm Nature Park
Bivens Arm Nature Park is 57 acres of marsh and oak hammock with a wildlife sanctuary, shaded family picnic grounds, an observation pavilion and a mile-long nature trail with a 1,200 foot boardwalk. The wetlands and creeks bordered by beautiful upland mixed forests is a true natural treasure. The Park connects the southernmost Gainesville creeks to the wetlands of Paynes Prairie State Preserve. The park’s trail meanders through uplands past numerous large live oaks, while the boardwalk and main pavilion border a small marsh. Birders especially enjoy the Bivens Arm Nature Park, where wading birds, including great blue herons, little blue herons, cattle egrets, great egrets and snowy egrets can be seen. You will also see purple gallinules, common moorhens, and a variety of native turtles. You may hear barred owls or great horned owls, and in April and October you may see migratory songbirds such as hermit thrushes and American redstarts.
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McLaughlin Bay Wildlife Reserve
McLaughlin Bay Wildlife Reserve is named after the automakers' founder, Col. Sam McLaughlin, the Reserve has become a popular attraction for lovers of nature and peaceful surroundings. The Reserve occupies in excess of 41 ha (108 acres) of land owned and operated by General Motors of Canada Limited. An additional 40 ha of the same tract has been set aside for the office complex, parking and services, along with adequate buffer zones. Home to almost 400 different varieties of plants, trees, shrubs and wildflowers, as well as a great number of native birds, mammals and fish, the McLaughlin Bay Wildlife Reserve features a number of walking trails, viewing platforms for photographers and birdwatchers as well as the Dogwood Trail, for use by partially-sighted or visually-impaired visitors. It is open to the public seven days a week, year-round, free of charge, and is wheel-chair accessible. A series of 11 trails in network of McLaughlin Bay Wildlife Reserve - connected to Second Marsh Wildlife Area and Darlington Provincial Park - part of provincial waterfront system.
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Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
Only 12km from Brisbane City, Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary is the world’s first and largest koala sanctuary with 130 koalas. Hold a koala, hand feed kangaroos and meet a large variety of Australian wildlife in beautiful, natural settings. Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary opened in 1927 as a safe refuge for sick, injured, and oprhaned koalas, at a time when the species was being culled for the fur trade. Founder, Claude Reid, recognised something had to be done to help protect one of Australia's most iconic species. Today, Lone Pine remains as a destination for local and international guests to not only see native Australian animals, but to also connect and learn, and to leave feeling inspired to make small, positive changes in their daily lives to help protect their own native wildlife and habitats.
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Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary
Explore this iconic Gold Coast Wildlife Sanctuary. Immerse yourself into the wonder and natural beauty of 27 hectares of Currumbin rainforest, wandering through open animal enclosures, feeding kangaroos and cuddling koalas along the way. Experience the wild lorikeet feeding, free flight bird shows and Aboriginal performances. Test your physical ability on the TreeTops Challenge High Ropes Course, an exhilarating 90 challenge canopy ropes course and see the wonderful vets in action within the Wildlife Hospital precinct. With a huge outdoor themed playground, Wild Island, there is plenty of entertainment for kids to enjoy as they tour the sanctuary on a miniature train. Lost Valley a new exotic precinct features five hectares of stunning rainforest, Lost Valley takes you on a journey through the ancient supercontinent Gondwana. Explore a forgotten world and get up close and personal with some of the world's most unique and distinctive flora and wildlife including friendly Lemurs, Cotton-top tamarins, Red pandas, Capybaras along with free-flying birds and exotic reptiles.
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Billabong Zoo
At the multiple award-winning Billabong Zoo you can get up-close and personal to Australian and exotic animals. You can pat, stroke, feed, hold, hear and see over 80 species of mammals, reptiles and birds. They care for over 200 animals in this friendly 10 acre Koala and Wildlife Park. Enjoy their much loved Zoo Talks throughout the day. All free as they are included in the admission price. Learn about their passion for conservation as Ambassadors for Wildlife and their world-renowned koala breeding programme. Book one-on-one Up-Close personal encounters with some very special animals: cheetahs, snow leopards, koalas, red pandas, meerkats, snakes. Enjoy the playground and picnic areas set in beautiful lush gardens with tranquil koi ponds. Delicious hot food, snacks, ice-cream, coffee and drinks at the great Zoo Cafe. Souvenirs and retail therapy in the popular Zoo Shop.
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Bronx Zoo
The Bronx Zoo of the Wildlife Conservation Society is the premier place to study and appreciate the world's many creatures. Home to more than 6,000 animals, the zoo spans 265 acres that re-create the diverse natural habitats of its numerous residents. Open year-round, it’s a great experience in any season. During the winter, be sure to stop by Tiger Mountain or Himalayan Highlands to see big cats enjoying the chilly outdoors—then head to World of Reptiles or JungleWorld for a warm up with tropical wildlife.
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Hangzhou Safari Park
The Hangzhou Safari Park is a fully-fledged zoo and safari park with quite an array of exotic animals. Lions, Siberian Tigers, and the odd Hippo steal the show, but The Naughty Monkey Cage is good for giggles too: nit-eating Monkeys preening every conceivable part of their bodies will have you in stitches. You can take the train around the safari park or even drive yourself via private car entry. At every stop there are zookeepers, some feeding mulberry bushes to the Camels or apples the Brown Bear, or giving live chickens to the Cheetahs to squabble over. Circus, Bird and Elephant shows can be seen at various times throughout the day.