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Theaters in Johannesburg

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Gold Reef City
Living and breathing 24 hours a day, Gold Reef City has something for everyone. Our casino complex is constantly alive with excitement and energy. Enjoy thrilling gaming in the casino and stand a chance to win in one of its many exciting promotions. Watch world-class productions at The Lyric, or catch the latest blockbusters in a Victorian train station-themed movies@ cinema complex. Have fun in a action-packed Ten-Pin Bowling alley and enjoy mouth-watering dining at a wide variety of restaurants and fast food outlets. Gold Reef City exhilarating Theme Park includes 18 thrill rides, 13 dedicated rides for the kiddies, Jump City Trampoline Park, the only authentic underground mine tour in Johannesburg and other great attractions. Gold Reef City gives you an incredible variety of fun things to do in Johannesburg, all in one exciting destination. Come and play, relax and enjoy world-class entertainment.
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The Labia Theatre
The Labia Theatre is one of Cape Town’s favourite lesser-known attractions. The locals, of course, know it very well. It’s one of Cape Town’s favourite things to do, especially on nights when there’s a dinner special running.
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Habima Theater
The Habima Theater has been Israel’s National Theater since 1935. It was originally the conception of organizers Hannah Rubina and Aaron Baskin, who brought with them from Moscow to Tel Aviv the idea of promoting a unique Hebrew-language theatre and local actors. In keeping with its original purpose, the Habima Theater hosts live theatre, unique events and seminars. Plays chosen at the Habima Theater most often deal with issues important to the State of Israel and its diverse mixture of population. Recurring themes include tensions between Arab and Jewish Israelis, religious and secular Jews, new immigrants and native-born Israelis, and Holocaust memoirs, government corruption or the issue of foreign workers. In order to reach out to all audiences, the Habima Theater also features classic international plays and organizes acting workshops and activities for Israeli youth. Simultaneous translation is available for most live performances. Additionally, the Habima Theater is a member of the Union of the Theatres of Europe and is often invited to join in world tours as a result of this prestigious membership. The original Habima Theater building, which is located at the end of Rothschild Boulevard, has been renovated and was recently inaugurated in the art complex next to the Helena Rubinstein Pavilion for Contemporary Art and the Mann Auditorium, home of the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra.
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Kourion Ancient Amphitheater
One of the most beautiful and interesting for visiting amphitheatres is located in Kourion. It will amaze travellers with its majestic appearance, the beauty of the preserved antique mosaics and the magnificent panoramic view that opens from spectators’ seats.
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Ancient Theater of Milos
The Theater of Milos is one of the most important archaeological findings of the island of Milos. It is located in the area of Tripiti and its construction dates back to the Hellenistic Age (3rd century BC). As archaeological investigations are completed, its Roman phase apparent phase of the Roman theatre. The excavations have unearthed 7 rows of marble seats as well as the stage. Today it holds around 700 spectators, while in antiquity it is estimated that it was 7.000. It is worth visiting the ancient theatre of Milos or any of the representations or breakfast before your bath.
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Odeon of Herodes Atticus
One of the legendary sites that sits beneath the slopes of the Acropolis on the southwest side, is the stunning open-air theatre, Odeon of Herodes Atticus. In ancient times, Odeons were built for musical contests and this ancient stone theatre has gone on to host some of the world’s best musical performances during the last 60 years since its modern day re-opening, including Nana Mouskouri, Luciano Pavarotti and Frank Sinatra to name a few. Widely known by locals as simply “Herodeon”, it was built between 160AD – 174AD by the wealthy benefactor of Athens, Herodes Atticus as an ode to his late wife Rigilla. It was the third Odeon to be built in Athens and was distinctively Roman in contrast to the nearby Theatre of Dionysos. With its Roman arches and three story stage building, it was originally partly covered with a wood and tiled roof. The circular orchestra has now become a semi-circle, paved with black and white marble. With 35 rows, the marble auditorium extends slightly beyond a semi-circle with a diameter of 80 metres and today seats 4680 people.
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Teatro Massimo
An artwork of imposing beauty that welcomes tourists and Palermitans who make an appointment every day on the steps of what is considered an inevitable stage of the city center.
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Free Palermo Theater
A place of research and experimentation, identification and presentation of new dramas, elaboration and production of own works, promotion and dissemination of theater
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Ancient Theatre of Ankara
The theatre was built on a semicircular plan, and the hillside of the citadel supported its audience. Two vaulted passages still lead to the orchestra, a semicircular space occupied by the choir during the performances. In the case of the theatre in Ankara, it has a diameter of about 13 meters and is surrounded by a thick wall. Unfortunately, it is not known what material was used for the floor of the orchestra. A proscenium, i.e. the platform where the actors performed, has also been preserved. Only the northern part of skene, the structure at the back of a theatre stage housing changing rooms and warehouses of props, has survived in Ankara. The choir used the passages called parodoi, of which the eastern one survived to our times in its entirety, and the western one - only in fragments. The seats in the theatre and radially ascending stairs were made of stones, debris, and plaster. The auditorium was divided into four horizontal sections. It is estimated that the theatre had from 20 to 22 rows of seats and it could accommodate between three and five thousand spectators. Therefore, it is a relatively small example of such a building in Asia Minor. The seats from the audience were later used to build the walls of the citadel, although archaeologists managed to excavate two of them in their original location. They were made of andesite, and their height was about 40 cm.
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Piazza Sant
Piazza Sant'Oronzo narrates the city's entire history. The Roman period is visible in the ruins of the Amphitheatre that becomes the exceptional stage for theatrical performances in summertime, and in part by the high Column - on which stands a bronze of St. Orontius, depicted in the act of blessing - erected in the 17th Century utilizing some of the Roman columns positioned on the Ancient Appian Way.
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Ancient Theatre of Ohrid
The builders of Ohrid’s ancient theater have estimated very precisely where to put the building - in the center of the elevated old town. The open theater holds a perfect location, as the two hills (Gorni Saraj and Deboj) keep it protected from winds that could interfere with acoustics during performances. The Ancient theatre of Ohrid of the Hellenistic period was built in 200 BC and is the only Hellenistic-type theatre in the country as the other three in Scupi, Stobi and Heraclea Lyncestis are from Roman times. It is unclear how many people the original theatre used to seat, as only the lower section still exists. During Roman times, the theater was also used for gladiator fights. However, since the theater was also a site of executions of Christians by the Romans, it rapidly turned to a highly disliked site by the locals. In fact, as a result of this dislike, the theatre was abandoned and buried by the locals after the demise of the Roman Empire. Discovered accidentally and later excavated completely, this 4, 000 square meter monument to antique Greco-Roman culture is being used today during the annual Ohrid Summer Festival for performances of ancient tragedies and comedies. The Theatre offers a wonderful view of Lake Ohrid and Mt. Galichica to the southeast.
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Teatro Lirico (Opera House)
Designed in the 1960s to replace the Civic Theatre devastated by the bombing in 1943, Teatro Lirico (Opera House) offers high level concert seasons and cultural events.
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Teatro Kursaal Santa Lucia
Strolling along the seaside promenade Goffredo di Crollalanza, you’ll come across one of the most beautiful late-Liberty buildings ever made in Bari, overlooking the gardens of Adua square and the sea.
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Teatro Petruzzelli
Much like La Fenice in Venice, the Teatro Petruzzelli has a story of destruction and rebirth. Originally constructed in 1903, the theater was destroyed by arson in 1991. It took years to get construction re-started, but finally, in 2009, ownership of the theater passed from private hands to the city of Bari and the theater re-opened with a performance of the Ninth Symphony by Beethoven.
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The Ancient Theatre of Philipoppol
The Ancient theatre of Philipoppol is one of the best-preserved ancient theatres in the World. It is located on the Southern slope of the Three Hills, in the saddle between Taksim and Dzhambaz tepe. Discovered by archaeologists from Plovdiv and reconstructed in the beginning of the 80s of XX century, the Ancient theatre of Philipoppol is among the most significant findings from the Roman period. Recently found and deciphered inscription on a monumental pedestal reveals that the theatre has been constructed in the 90s of I century A.D., when Philippolol was under the rulership of Titus Flavius Cotis – an heir of a Thracian Royal Dynasty, the high priest of the Tracian province, representative of the Metropolitan Court of Justice and a person in charge of the construction sites. Nowadays, the Ancient theatre is symbolical for Plovdiv and adjusted to the city’s modern cultural life. It is operating as a stage of opera, music and drama. Some of the best annual events are the International Folklore Festival, the Opera Festival "Opera Open", the Rock Festival "Sounds of Ages" and many others.
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Ivan Vazov National Theater
The “Ivan Vazov” National Theatre is Bulgaria’s biggest theatre, as well as the oldest and most stand out and most imposing theatre in the country. This theatre is one of the major landmarks in Sofia due to its prime location and grandiose architecture. The National theatre is located in the centre of Sofia and its edifice faces the City Garden. The Ivan Vazov National Theatre has a well-equipped main stage with 750 seats, a smaller 120-seat stage and an additional 70-seat one on the fourth floor. The theatre employs some of the country’s best actors and stage directors, many of whom are widely popular.
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Apollo Theater
There is no record of the date of the project or the name of the architect author. The only data found in the municipal archives and collected by the historian Emilio Villanueva (“Urbanism and Architecture in Modern Almería”) are proof that the new Apollo Theatre was built in 1881 on the site that had previously occupied the Teatro Calderón. At a time abounding recreational societies was one of them, the Society of Twenty, who promoted its construction becoming the first owner of the theatre. In January 1984, the Directorate General of Architecture and Housing, Ministry of Public Works, Transport and Environment, commissioned the architect Angel Jaramillo Esteban, performing some previous studies for the rehabilitation of the building, and then in 1985 the corresponding project.The works managed by the Hon. Almería City Council, beginning in 1987 under the direction of the same architect and then for various reasons remain stalled between 1989 and 1992, were completed in 1993, having taken part in financing the ministries of Public Works, Transport and Environment and Culture and the Departments of Public Works and Transport and Culture and the Environment of the Junta de Andalucía
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Roman Theatre
In 1990 the first remains of what would be one of the most interesting monuments of the city of Cartagena were discovered accidentally. It is one of the largest and most comprehensive theatres throughout Spain. It was built in 44 BC when Octavian Augustus was emperor and Cartagena was a Roman colony (Colonia Urbs Nova Carthago) going through a period of high population and economic development; at that time it was called Carthago Nova. From its location, the theatre has witnessed different periods of the history of Cartagena, since the Roman Empire, up to the present, overlapping constructions of each of the historical periods. The Roman Theatre faithfully followed the theatre model proposed by Vitruvius. It was built almost entirely in the rock on a hill.
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Sea Garden
Nowadays the Marine Gardens form an imposing park where you can visit the Natural Science Museum, the Naval Museum, the Copernicus Astronomy Complex planetarium, the first in the country, the zoo and the Terrarium. Here one can find the only Dolphinarium and Aquarium in the country. There are also a swimming pool, tennis court, an open-air theater and a new children's complex (opened on 1 May 2002) with a lot of amusements: water wheels, slide, archery, trampoline. Along the alley, which runs parallel to the coastline, there are a number of small cafes and restaurants, offering seafood specialties as well as attractive discos.
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Fort Lovrijenac
Fort Lovrijenac or St. Lawrence Fortress, often called “Dubrovnik’s Gibraltar”, is a fortress and theater located outside the western wall of the city of Dubrovnik in Croatia, 37 m above sea level. Famous for its plays and importance in resisting Venetian rule, it overshadows the two entrances to the city, from the sea and by land. Early in the 11th century the Venetians attempted to build a fort on the same spot where Fort Lovrijenac currently stands. If they had succeeded, they would have kept Dubrovnik under their power, but the people of the city beat them to it. The “Chronicles of Ragusa” reveal how the fort was built within just three months time and from then on constantly reconstructed. When the Venetian ships arrived, full of materials for the construction of the fort, they were told to return to Venice. The Croatian leg of the Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series takes place in Lovrijenac.
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Romea Theater
With more than 150 years of history, the eclectic building of the Romea Theater is one of the most important cultural references of the city. Built after an earlier one that suffered two fires, the current theater was inaugurated in 1900 thanks to the architect Justo Millán.
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Bucharest National Opera House
Bucharest National Opera House needed headquarters since the beginning of the 19th century. The nowadays building housing the National Opera in Bucharest was designed in 1946. The first Italian theater was opened in Bucharest in 1843 and it has to do with the National Opera, for it was opened with the opera Norma by Vincenzo Bellini, followed by the Barber of Seville by Rossini. In 1870, the composer and conductor George Stefanescu tried to persuade the authorities to build a headquarters for the Opera. Thus he launches the Opera Company in 1885 with the performance of Linda di Chamonix by Donizetti, sung in Romanian. Only in 1921, the Opera Company receives the necessary funds in order to organize itself in the new institutional order, becoming the Romanian Opera. The premiere of Lohengrin by Richard Wagner, with George Enescu conducting, was the opening performance that year. The theater was built in classical style. The main hall ha 2200 seats, surrounded by lodges and amazing acoustics. There are four caryatids, four statues, Drama and Poetry statues, a bas-relief called Music and another one called The Dance. George Enescu’s monument is in front of the building.
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Romanian Athenaeum
Romanian Athenaeum is one of the most beautiful buildings in Bucharest and cultural center and also host for GEORGE ENESCU FESTIVAL. In 1886, authorities bought the land where the future Athenaeum was to be built. This is how the history of the Romanian Athenaeum begins. The French architect Albert Galleron and the Romanian architects Grigore Cerchez, Alexandru Orascu, Ion Mincu and I.N. Socolescu started the project. Works began in 1886 and were finished in 1889. It was built in neoclassical style, it has Greek temple elements but also French decorations from the end of the 19th century. A circus was on the land of the nowadays Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest. The entrance has 6 Greek columns, the dome is Baroque style, 41 meters high. The interior of the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest includes exhibits rooms, concert halls and conferences halls. 12 Greek columns sustain one of the main halls, the Rotonda. 4 monumental stairs start from here, imitating Carrara marble, made by the famous architect, Carol Stork. The honour stairs also start from here. The great circular hall is 16 meters high, 28,50 meters in diameter and 784 seat capacity. There is also an ensemble of 75 meters long and 3 meters high of paintings, made in alfresco style, representing 25 scenes from Romania’s history. In 1944, during the war, the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest was devastated by German and American bombs but it was rebuilt in 1945.
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The City of Arts and Sciences
The work of Valencia’s own Santiago Calatrava, this is an example of architecture at its most futuristic. The colossal structure houses an IMAX cinema (situated in the Hemisfèric), as well as Europe’s largest aquarium – the Oceanogràfic,
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Croatian National Theatre Zadar
The Croatian National Theatre has its ensemble that was founded 14 years ago when it starts with professional productions with Zadar acting forces. It has a prepaid and not prepaid programme as also the Zadar Theatre Summer. Croatian medieval liturgical dramas and liturgical games have been performed in Zadar already in the 11th century, so it is since then that begins the history of Croatian theatre. The first modern theatre dates back to the year 1783 (Nobile Teatro), while the New Theatre from the year 1865 was the most beautiful theatre building in Zadar. The first professional theatre from 1945 carries the name National theatre (Narodno kazalište), and today Croatian National Theatre (Hrvatsko narodno kazalište) Zadar. The total percentage of visits to its programmes is 85 per cent.
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Roman Theater Pula
On the northeastern slopes of the central hill of the city, below the Castle are the remains of a Roman theater: in addition to the Amphitheater, Pula had two other theaters during the Roman period. The larger one, which has not been preserved, was situated outside the city, on the slopes of Zaro hill (Monte Zaro), south of the city walls. The other theater known as the Small Roman Theater was situated within the city walls. The remains of scene, semicircular orchestra and tired section for the audience have partly been reconstructed. Below the theater is the building of the one-time German Royal Gymnasium, which in 1930 became the Archaeological Museum of Istria. Today the museum displays a rich collection of prehistoric, classical and early medieval monuments found in Istria.
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Arena Amphitheater
The most famous and important monument, the starting and ending point of every sightseeing tour is the Amphitheater, popularly called the Arena of Pula, which was once the site of gladiator fights. It was built in the 1st century AD during the reign of Emperor Vespasian, at the same time as the magnificent Colosseum in Rome. The ground plan is elliptical, the longer axis measuring about 130 m and the shorter one about 100 m. Gladiator fights took place in the central flat area called the arena, while the spectators could sit on the stone tiers or stand in the gallery. It is believed that the Amphitheater could seat about 20,000 spectators. Local limestone was used for its construction. In the Middle Ages, it was the site of knights tournaments and fairs. Today, it is the venue for many different events – Pula Film Festival, various concerts, opera, ballet, sports competitions… since its capacity is about 5000 spectators.
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Palais des Festivals et des Congres
The Palais des Festivals et des Congrès has been created to accommodate the largest festival of cinema in the world. The destiny of Cannes is then drawn naturally. The flagship destination of business tourism, Cannes, lives throughout the year at the rhythm of many international and professional events. The level of excellence is confirmed year after year. No need to attach to it the words "film" or "cinema", the Festival of Cannes for 60 years is the Festival of the 7th Art, the world's largest event of this art which became an industry. The history took life in 1946 after the painful interlude of the Second World War which had suspended the projects of the French State to have an international competition of films. Cannes takes the priority to Vichy, Biarritz or even Lucerne. Cannes sunshine and also the facilities that it offers made it win the project. And especially since Cannes promised the construction of a palace specially dedicated to the festival. With its 88 000 sq.m building, its 35,000 sq.m of exhibition space, and its 15 auditoriums, the Cannes Palais des Festivals et des Congrès rank Cannes as the second destination for business tourism in France only behind Paris. The Palais hosts each year approximately 300,000 congress delegates and around 40 to 50 international professional events. The Cannes Film Festival is today the cultural event with the most media coverage in the world. Only two sports events, the Football World Cup and the Summer Olympic Games run ahead with the media.
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La Llotja de Lleida
La Llotja is a monolithic construction, subdivided into three functional levels allowing it to serve different purposes. The central level is the interconnecting core, linking up the various programmes by means of the central stairway/ramp, which also provides illumination.
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Monte-Carlo Casino
As you arrive at the Place du Casino, the sight of this masterpiece by the famous architect Charles Garnier will take your breath away. Built in 1863, the Casino has been designed around an atrium surrounded by 28 onyx columns, behind which the Salle Garnier, an Italian theatre decorated in red and gold is the veritable miniature replica of the Paris opera house.
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La Criee
A fish market opened here in 1909 until 1975 when it was moved to the north of the city to the industrial port of Saumaty. The building’s interior was completely redesigned but its exterior was kept intact. The Théâtre National de Marseille was opened in 1981 by the Mayor of Marseille Gaston Defferre. La Criée was managed by Marcel Maréchal for over a decade and hosts an exciting schedule every season. Opposite the ferry boat pier lies the Bar de La Marine made famous by Marcel Pagnol. It is the main location in the “Marius, Fanny, César” film trilogy filmed at the Old Port in Marseille in the 30s.
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Open Air Theatre
Opatija, this jewel of the Adriatic Sea, with its tradition in tourism of more than 160 years is one of the best known destinations in Croatia. Situated on the eastern rim of the Mediterranean basin, on the coast of the Kvarner Bay, at the foot of the Učka Mountain slopes
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Ioan Slavici Classical Theater
The Ioan Slavici Classical Theatre (Teatrul Clasic Ioan Slavici) is a three-story, nineteenth century, neoclassical theatre located in the city of Arad. The building was named after one of Romania’s most renowned writers, journalist, and Arad native, Ioan Slavici. The theatre has put on thousands of shows throughout the decades that have delighted and dazzled guests from both near, and afar. The theatre’s inception took place in 1868 when Arad’s city mayor, Aztel Peter, and the baron, Béla Bánhidy, along with other city officials, decided that the city had to have a new theatre. After the decision was made they moved forward and replaced Arad’s old and outdated baroque style theatre, which had been functioning as the city’s primary theatre since 1817, with the new Ioan Slavici Classical Theatre.
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Teatro Colon
The Colón theatre is considered one of the best opera houses in the world, together with La Scala in Milán, the Opera Garnier in Paris and the Royal Opera House in London, and is renowned for its acoustics and architecture. Designed by Francesco Tamburini, Victor Meano and Jules Dormal, and built over 20 years, the theatre opened in 1908 and went on to host some of the most important conductors, singers and dancers of the twentieth century, including Igor Stravinsky, Herbert von Karajan, Daniel Barenboim, Maria Callas, Luciano Pavarotti, Plácido Domingo, Rudolf Nureyev, Julio Bocca and Maximiliano Guerra.