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Brisbane City Hall
Whether you are a local or a tourist to Brisbane, a guided tour provides an opportunity to learn something about the art, architecture and history of City Hall. The building known in Brisbane as "the People's Place", City Hall was built between 1920 and 1930. The heritage-listed Brisbane City Hall is seen as the heart of Brisbane and has been the backdrop to many cultural, social and civic events. City Hall is the civic seat of the city and is home to the Lord Mayor and Deputy Mayor, and plays host to community and corporate events daily. City Hall is a bustling, active working building, so you may find that some of the rooms and features are not open to the public on certain days. Accompanied by a professional guide, these tours provide further access to different parts of the building as possible.
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Art Deco
Napier's Art Deco town centre is unique. Rivalled only by Miami beachfront Streamline Moderne, it is the most comprehensive Art Deco styled town in the world. Fascination with cinema, Hollywood and exotic imagery from Africa and South America mixed with expressions of new and exciting transport engineering; railway, steamships, cars and airplanes, is what gives Art Deco its distinct look. Other period styles such as Spanish Mission and Stripped Classical were also tested and mixed in. Notable Architect J. A. Louis Hay also experimented with the palette of Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie Style. Despite this altogether global influence, the town retains its kiwi nature in building and street scale, bright colour, and New Zealand's typically quirky and innovative appropriation of international trends. An architecture that embodies an era's optimism in the face of such a tragedy; enjoy this town's many architectural treasures with a variety of walks and guided tours, or take it in at your own pace as you stroll down the palm-lined Marine Parade.
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Cibodas
Away from Cibodas, and further down the road is the town of Cipanas. Here is the Cipanas Palace, the President’s mountain residence set amidst manicured lawns and refreshing hot springs. Cipanas has grown into a sizable town, where is a market where tourists come to shop for fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers, decorative plants and souvenirs. And everywhere along the Bogor-Cipanas route up to Bandung, there are plentiful hotels, from the most exclusive accommodation complete with meeting facilities, to housing estates, to the more simple accommodation. There are also many flower gardens, fruit gardens, playgrounds and much more for families to enjoy.
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Tsim Sha Tsui
Located on the tip of Hong Kong’s peninsula by Victoria Harbour, Tsim Sha Tsui is famous for its iconic view of the city’s harbour. This neighbourhood should be your top priority if you’re a first-time visitor! Tsim Sha Tsui is one of the busiest districts in Kowloon, and there’s plenty to see and do here. The shopping scene is varied, ranging from designer boutiques to local bric-a-brac stores. It’s also a good place to find a range of museums, galleries and live performances. But perhaps what it’s best known for is its view of Hong Kong’s harbour; here, you can watch the junk boats sail across Victoria Bay against the backdrop of an expansive glittering skyline.
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Shamian Island
Shamian Island is Guangzhou's scenic foreign settlement, and ranks as one of the best tourist attractions in Guangzhou and is a treat for fans of architecture and history alike. Tree-lined quiet pedestrian-only roads make for a wonderful place to visit for a stroll, and the area is a quiet reminder of Guangzhou's colonial European period. Sightseers will notice that structures in one area of the island have more of an English style and that one area has more of French style, which is a result of Guangzhou's tumultuous history on this island. While walking around Shamian Island, there are lots of incredible buildings to be seen, and there is a lot of opportunity to try different cuisines including the local Cantonese cuisine. It's a great place for a stroll, and you'll find many old official embassy buildings, cathedrals, churches, as well as shade walking along the greenery. Lady of Lourdes Chapel, a big French cathedral, stands out as one of the most interesting buildings on the island. It was built in 1892. There is also the British Protestant Church, Christ Church Shameen, which was built in 1865 and makes for an interesting sight. Tourists appreciate the island as a quiet place to get away from the crowds and noise of the city, and you'll find various bronze statues around depicting life on the island in earlier times. Traffic is controlled to keep the island quiet, so it is partly pedestrian only.
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Khao San Road
Khao San Road - The popular book 'The Beach' famously described Khao San Road as "the centre of the backpacking universe". Judging by the truth-seeking travellers who converge here it's a phrase that sums it up pretty much perfectly. On Khao San itself and the streets either side, you can shop, exchange tales and prepare for you next stint on the backpacker trail. Packed into a 1 km-long strip are budget guesthouses and mid-range hotels, internet cafes, bars, restaurants, massage parlours, travel agents, bookshops, market stalls, tattoo shops and much more. So much, in fact, that the people, peddlers and party spirit have spilt over into nearby Soi Rambuttri. With its carefree, anything-goes vibe, it's quite unlike anywhere else in Bangkok.
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Abeno Harukas
Standing 300 meters tall, Abeno Harukas (あべのハルカス) in Osaka is the tallest skyscraper in Japan. The building stands on top of the Kintetsu Osaka Abenobashi Station and is conveniently located across from JR Tennoji Station. It houses a department store, an art museum, a hotel and an observation deck. The observation deck is called "Harukas 300" and occupies the building's top three floors (floors 58 to 60). The observation deck is accessed by elevators from the 16th floor. With large floor-to-ceiling glass panels all around, the 60th floor offers 360-degree views of Osaka, while the 58th floor features an attractively designed inner court with a wooden deck and cafe. A souvenir shop and restrooms with views are also available.
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Odaiba
Odaiba is a popular shopping and entertainment district on a man made island in Tokyo Bay. It originated as a set of small man made fort islands (daiba literally means "fort"), which were built towards the end of the Edo Period (1603-1868) to protect Tokyo against possible attacks from the sea and specifically in response to the gunboat diplomacy of Commodore Perry. More than a century later, the small islands were joined into larger islands by massive landfills, and Tokyo began a spectacular development project aimed to turn the islands into a futuristic residential and business district during the extravagant 1980s. But development was critically slowed after the burst of the "bubble economy" in the early 1990s, leaving Odaiba nearly vacant. It was not until the second half of the 1990s, when several hotels, shopping malls and the Yurikamome elevated train line were opened, that Odaiba developed into one of Tokyo's most popular tourist attractions and date spots with a wide selection of shopping, dining and leisure options. Despite the initial setbacks, several lavish development projects did materialize, including some of Tokyo's boldest architectural creations, such as the Fuji TV Building, Telecom Center and Tokyo Big Sight. Modern city planning furthermore provides Odaiba with plenty of green space and a pleasant division of motorized and pedestrian traffic using elevated walkways and the like.
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Higashiyama District
The Higashiyama District (東山) along the lower slopes of Kyoto's eastern mountains is one of the city's best preserved historic districts. It is a great place to experience traditional old Kyoto, especially between Kiyomizudera and Yasaka Shrine, where the narrow lanes, wooden buildings and traditional merchant shops invoke a feeling of the old capital city. Recent renovations to remove telephone poles and repave the streets have further improved the traditional feel of the district. The streets in Higashiyama are lined by small shops, cafes and restaurants which have been catering to tourists and pilgrims for centuries. These businesses retain their traditional design, although many have been renovated through the years, and they continue to serve customers today, selling local specialties such as Kiyomizu-yaki pottery, sweets, pickles, crafts and other souvenirs. The shops and restaurants in the area typically open around nine or ten in the morning and close relatively early around five or six in the evening, except during the ten day long Hanatoro in March when the streets of Higashiyama are lined by thousands of lanterns and many of the area's temples, shrines and businesses have extended hours and special illuminations.
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Pontocho
Pontocho (先斗町, Pontochō) is one of Kyoto's most atmospheric dining areas. It is a narrow alley running from Shijo-dori to Sanjo-dori, one block west of Kamogawa River. The alley is packed with restaurants on both sides offering a wide range of dining options from inexpensive yakitori to traditional and modern Kyoto cuisine, foreign cuisine and highly exclusive establishments that require the right connections and a fat wallet. Most of the restaurants along the eastern side of the alley overlook Kamogawa River. From May to September, many of them build temporary platforms over the flowing water where patrons can dine out in the open air. Known as kawayuka, this type of dining was developed as a way to beat the summer heat and is a great way to try some traditional Kyoto cuisine while taking in the cooling effects of the flowing water and the lively summer atmosphere.
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Kibune Town
Kibune (貴船) is a small town in a forested valley in the northern mountains of Kyoto City, which developed around Kifune Shrine. According to legend, a goddess traveled in a boat from Osaka all the way up the river into the mountains north of Kyoto, and Kifune Shrine was built at the site where her boat journey had come to an end. Kifune Shrine is dedicated to the god of water and rain and believed to be the protector of those at sea. Here you can obtain a unique type of fortune written on paper slips (omikuji) that reveal their messages when dipped into water. Okunomiya, the inner sanctum and original site of Kifune Shrine, lies about one kilometer further up the valley. It has a large rock, known as the boat stone, which is said to be where the goddess' yellow boat is buried. The rest of the town is made up by traditional styled ryokan and restaurants that line the narrow road for a few hundred meters parallel to Kibune River. It is a popular retreat from Kyoto's famed summer heat, but is also well visited in autumn when the leaves change.
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Taxco
It is a small but charming “Magical Town”, just 4 hours away from Acapulco, nestled in an area surrounded by great hills and mountains, thanks to the intense exploitation of its silver deposits. Its people still live from the commerce and manufacture of objects that the precious metal alloys; the baroque constructions raised during the mining boom of the Colony are still preserved. Any terrace is good to contemplate those jewels of the past, the new and small must be sought among the cobbled streets that go up and down everywhere. In addition, Taxco has a peculiar beauty, because this magnificent Magical Town has the ability to transport us to another time and space, just to the time of colonial Mexico. Its beautiful cobblestone streets are characterized by its inclination, and almost all of them lead to beautiful little squares where it is possible to walk, visit the kiosk or sit on one of their benches.
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Abyaneh Village
Abyaneh village is situated on the slopes of Karkass Mountain in Natanz County of Isfahan Province. With a population of 301 (2016 census), the history of Abyaneh village dates back to 1500 years ago, making it one of the top attractions of Isfahan, and one of the unique villages of Iran, for its peculiar reddish hue. Most famed for its peculiar red hue and nature-adapted layout, Abyaneh village attracts thousands of Iranian and foreign tourists year-round. However, there is more to Abyaneh red village than meets the eye, which is why it was listed as one of Iran’s national heritage sites in 1975. According to a 2016 census, the population of Abyaneh village was 301. People mostly subsist on agriculture (including orchards) and raising cattle; While rug weaving workshops and making traditional Giveh shoes are a source of income for the villagers too. Needless to say that tourism is an ever-growing industry for Abyaneh historical village.
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Embu das Artes Fair
The Arts and Crafts Fair is one of the main tourist attractions of Embu das Artes, located 27 km from São Paulo. A small town with less than 300 thousand inhabitants that breathes culture, Embu das Artes has its name because it has received great artists, especially Brazilian modernists, such as Anita Malfatti, Oswald de Andrade and Tarsila do Amaral. Occurring since 1969, the Fair occupies the streets of the town’s historical center with artists who exhibit and sell various products, like porcelain, sculptures, paintings, baskets, lace, trinkets, musical instruments and decoration items. The Green Fair also takes place over there, offering plants and ornamental flowers. If you want to learn more about Brazilian history and art, you’ll be amazed by the museums, churches and memorials in town, such as the Jesuit Sacred Art Museum and the Saint Lazarus Chapel. Embu also has many bars and cozy cafes with live music for you to relax and enjoy after seeing the Fair.
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16th Street Mall
Built in 1982, the Mall is a tree-lined, pedestrian promenade of red-and-grey granite that runs through the center of Downtown and is lined with outdoor cafes, renovated historic office buildings, sparkling glass-walled skyscrapers, shops, restaurants and retail stores. Numerous fountains and plazas offer a variety of daily special events and entertainers. Free shuttle buses cruise the mile-long Mall seven days a week.
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Santa Teresa
Santa Teresa, the neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro that retain its colonial charm. Santa Teresa is located on top of the Santa Teresa hill and presents a magnificent view of the city. It is one of the few neighborhoods to resist development in order to retain its colonial charm. It is famous for its winding, narrow streets and for being an artistic hotspot. The construction of the Santa Teresa in the 18th century convent marked the beginning of the development of this neighborhood. Its natural scenery, the pleasant atmosphere and easy access to downtown Rio make this an attractive neighborhood. It is currently a popular tourist site as the area has its fair share of restaurants with live music, cultural centers and other attractions. Its bars and nightclubs are popular with both natives and tourists.
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Lapa
Lapa is a neighborhood famous for its Bohemian culture. It is well known for its architecture, the most famous monument being the Arcos da Lapa. The Passeio Publico is the first public park built in the city, which is another popular attraction of the neighborhood. Lapa is known for its lively social scene and cultural events. The neighborhood has many restaurants and bars. Many of these restaurants and clubs promote various forms of Brazilian music. The Sala Cecília Meirelles, an important venue for chamber music is also located in Lapa. The movement “I Am da Lapa” helped in the restoration of the neighborhood. With government support and active participation from the citizens, especially shop owners, great achievements in the development of the area have been made.
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Old Tatar Quarter
The Old Tatar Quarter (“Staro-Tatarskaya Sloboda”) is the soul of the historical part of Kazan. With its streets preserved from the medieval period, this is considered to be the main area of the Tatar city culture. Dozens of monuments have found refuge on the shores of Lake Kaban and Bulak ducts, in the heart of the capital of Tatarstan. The Old Tatar Quarter is spread over an area of 87.95 hectares, and you will find a total of 75 monuments of history and culture of the 18th – 20th centuries throughout it, which form the settlement itself. Among these are the houses of Yunusov-Apanaev, Shamil, Marjani, Kayum Nasyri, Shamil Yusupov and many others. The long list of masterpieces of architecture, however, should not deter you from simply enjoying the atmosphere of this historical place – there is much more to see than simply buildings. In the 19th century, an Oriental Club functioned in this settlement, where famous poets would read their works and some of the very first Tatar plays were staged. Mosques that were built here, are now known around the world - Apanaeva, Blue, Galeev, Burnaevskaya, and Sennaya (Nurulla) Mosques. Other places also decorate the settlement - a literary museum of Tatar poet Gabdulla Tukay, the house-museum of educator and scientist Kayum Nasyri, Tatar Academic Theatre named after Galiasgar Kamal and the “Tatarskaya Usadba” hotel and restaurant complex, which also includes a museum of Tatar life, a gallery of art crafts and a souvenir shop. And, of course some of the more modern places to visit here – for example the Chak-chak Museum (Tatar national delicacy) eagerly await visitors. Here, you can drink a cup of tea with oriental sweets and learn the secrets of ancient recipes of national dishes.
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Ramparts Walk
The Ramparts Walk in the Old City of Jerusalem is a gem hidden from locals and tourists alike. Hard to find, the Ramparts Walk is one of the most rewarding activities in terms of history, beauty and a greater sense of the Old City as a whole. Reasonably priced, the Ramparts Walk makes a great trip combined with the other activities and sites found in and around the Old City. The Ramparts Walk is divided into two separate walks, totally just under two miles: the north side walk and the south side walk. Both are included in the admission ticket and both have their differences. The north side walk is the longer of the two and covers a far greater area, from the Jaffa Gate (on the west side of the Old City) to the Lions Gate (on the east side, approaching the Dome of the Rock). The south side walk is shorter but ends at a more convenient location, the Western Wall (or Kotel as it is known in Hebrew). The south side walk begins at the Tower of David (on the west side of the Old City, beside the Jaffa Gate) and continues around to the south side of the city, ending off between the Zion and Dung Gates.
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Musrara
Musrara is a unique neighborhood in Jerusalem, a fascinating microcosm of the city’s history and its various population groups. Walking through the streets, you’ll notice that every house is built differently, and houses have been joined, expanded, cut up and renewed throughout the years of its turbulent history. The municipality has tried to change the name of the neighborhood to Morasha, and you’ll see this name on official maps, but Jerusalem residents proudly continue to use its old name. In recent years, a number of artists have moved to the neighborhood, and three art schools have opened up: a religious film school called Maaleh; Musrara, an edgy photography, animation and sound school; and the School for Oriental Music, which occasionally has open concerts in the evenings, and is lovely to walk past as the musicians practice during the day. These last two are both on Ayin Het street, and there is another gallery next to them. An artists’ collective called Muslala has sprung up, and they engage in artwork in the public domain, involving longtime local residents and social activists from East and West Jerusalem.
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Neve Tzedek
Neve Tzedek may well be one of Tel Aviv’s oldest districts, but it’s still young at heart! Newe Tzedek or Neve Tsedek, as it is also known is another district of Tel Aviv which has become increasingly fashionable in recent years, as restoration works have taken place to restore it to its former glory. Built in 1887, Neve Tzedek was the first Jewish neighbourhood outside of the old port city of Jaffa, built as a suburb. Its Oriental architectural style, combined with quaint, narrow streets with boutiques, make Neve Tzedek, which means Oasis of Justice, quite literally an oasis in the modern city. Neve Tzedek is today a real oasis in the bustling city of Tel Aviv. The magnificent buildings are all individual, and a relaxing stroll through the neighbourhood is a great way to spend some time. Shabazi Street is the main street through Neve Tzedek and, like many of the smaller side passages is lined with boutiques, galleries, and craft shops. The Suzanne Dellal Center is Tel Aviv’s dance centre with a superb piazza and interesting gardens, whilst popular cafe Suzanna shouldn’t be missed.
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Haifa's German Colony
Haifa’s German Colony is probably the culture and tourism centre of this beautiful city. Located just beneath the Bahai Gardens, Haifa’s largest tourist attraction, the German Colony has been beautifully restored in recent years and is now lined with trendy cafes, restaurants, and boutiques. A visit to Haifa is not complete without exploring the German Colony, and those who do visit take away great memories. A visit is definitely one of THE things to do in Haifa. The German Colony of Haifa is a small area located at the foot of the Baha’i Gardens and reaching the Port of Haifa. It was founded in the late 1860s by German Templars (not to be confused with the Templar Knights of the Crusaders who also settled in Northern Israel) and throughout the two world wars in the early 21st century was inhabited on-and-off by the German Protestants who built the area up. Today, Ben Gurion Avenue, the main road in the German Colony, is lined with distinct red-roofed cafés, restaurants and boutiques. Tourists flock to the German Colony for relaxation, culinary experiences and even the nightlife. In the German Colony, close to the port, is Haifa’s City Museum as well as the old City Center, a small mall. For those wishing to stay in the German Colony, the Colony Hotel Haifa can be found on Ben Gurion Avenue just minutes away from the Baha’i Gardens.
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Caraiva
The village of Caraíva in Bahia is formed by fishermen and has a very rustic style. This is one of those places that seem to have stood still in time. And, precisely, because of this old and pleasant way it is becoming a real sensation among tourists. When you close the distance between Trancoso and Caraíva, you will find dirt roads, rustic establishments and a small-town style. Even though Caraíva has acquired a slightly satisfactory structure, it still makes it clear that its essence is that of a fishing village and simple people. But, there is another reason and one of the main differentials of this very peculiar place! The truth is that automobiles cannot access this haven of modern life. The entire transfer of both the population and visitors needs to be carried out with boats and small boats. Doesn't it look like something from the last century? But, don't be fooled by this little difficulty! Whether to admire the sunset on the river, observe the meeting of the river's waters with the ocean and even to dance a lot at the balls animated by that tasty little forróro, you should consider the village and the Caraíva beach as your next destination.
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Exchange District
One of Canada’s architectural marvels, this 30-block district boasts North America’s most extensive (and handsome) turn of the 20th century buildings. While walking its charming streets you’ll find some of the city’s trendiest and tastiest spots including small plate restaurants and bistros who flaunt their exposed brick and beam, up-and-coming and established galleries, vintage and antique shops and some of the best the city has to offer in coffee and café culture. Also find an unparalleled collection of independent shops, locally made goods, delightfully curated vintage, and Winnipeg’s longest operating toy-store. The Exchange District is the perfect place to discover something new.
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Garden District
Love at first sight is a common experience for first time visitors to the Garden District. It often goes something like this: they’re traveling up St. Charles Avenue via the streetcar when they get their first glance of the oak tree lined streets and historic homes. You can tell by the pristine look on their faces, that the Garden District has started a new found romance. The romance blooms as the afternoon is spent exploring memories of New Orleans’ antebellum past, gazing at secluded mansions, wandering down the brick lined sidewalks. Its canopy of oak trees is world-famous, while its characteristic gardens of hibiscuses and crepe myrtles, angel trumpets and bougainvillea, make it one of New Orleans' most beautiful neighborhoods. The Garden District has worked its magic again.
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Bourbon Street
This street is a tourism destination for a reason. It’s a thoroughfare with an utterly fascinating history, home to some of the oldest bars, family-run restaurants and gay entertainment districts in the country. In short, while there’s plenty to discover off of Bourbon, there’s a lot to discover on the iconic street as well that may surprise those travelers who turn their nose up at all the flashing lights.
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Jackson Square
Historic Jackson Square, originally known in the 18th century as "Place d'Armes," and later renamed in honor of the Battle of New Orleans hero Andrew Jackson, is a timeless attraction in the heart of the French Quarter of New Orleans. This famous landmark facing the Mississippi River is surrounded by historic buildings, including the St. Louis Cathedral, the Presbytere and Cabildo (Louisiana State Museums), not to mention the Lower and Upper Pontalba Apartments, the oldest apartment buildings in the United States. The Pontalba Apartments offer retail shops, museums, galleries and restaurants on the ground level; their second and third floors still house a selection of prestigious apartments. For well over a half-century, there has been an open-air artist colony at Jackson Square. Local artists paint, draw, create portraits, caricatures, and display their work on the square's iron fence. Some have been there for generations! Jackson Square is a favorite site for visitors and locals. The artists, restaurants, museums, merchants and the square itself make Jackson Square one of the French Quarter's most popular destinations.
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Frenchmen Street
To this day, tour guides tell you that Frenchmen Street is an off the beaten gem, a ‘local’s Bourbon Street’ where the real New Orleanians gather to listen to live music and grab a drink. Excuse a bit of an eye roll on our part; That ‘locals-majority’ term may have rang true at the beginning of the twenty-teens, and to a degree, it’s an accurate description of Frenchmen throughout the 90s and much of the noughties. But the street really achieved a critical mass of popularity post-Katrina, and in the past few years, Frenchmen is tourist central come the evening, especially on weekends. On Frenchmen Street, certain things are just guaranteed: proximity to good music, good food, interesting culture, and an unbeatable street scene.
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Royal Street
For a full 13 blocks, Royal Street runs parallel to Bourbon Street, yet this thoroughfare – one of the finest stretches of art galleries, antique stores, wrought iron balconies, restaurants and architecture in the USA – is sometimes almost completely missed by visitors. This is a real shame; beyond the qualities we’ve just described, Royal Street makes a nice counterbalance to the neon and noise of Bourbon.
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Gammelstad Church Town
Gammelstad Church Town was included in UNESCO's World Heritage List in 1996, and is thereby covered by "The Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage". The objects on the World Heritage List all bear unique testimony to the history of the world and mankind. They are invaluable to humanity and must be preserved for posterity. The list contains about 750 cultural and natural environments of which the Great Wall of China, the Great Barrier Reef of Australia and Sveaborg outside Helsinki are among the better known. As well as Gammelstad Church Town, Norrbotten also has the World Heritage Laponia, which is the largest area of wilderness in Europe. Gammelstad is an outstanding example of a Northern Scandinavian church town. More than 400 cottages, which were used on Sundays and during major religious festivals, markets and local courts, are grouped around the late medieval stone church in Gammelstad. The cottages served as an overnight stop for parishioners who lived too far away to make the journey to the church and back in one day. The City of Luleå was founded around the old church in the 17th century. Today Gammelstad consists of a unique assortment of church cottages, year-round dwellings and public buildings. The church cottages are still used in a traditional way.
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German Village
And for family, friends, and visitors, it’s also a home away from home. That’s because you don’t have to live in German Village to live here. In German Village, its mission is simple: preserve, protect and promote life among the bricks. German Village Business Community is a collection of independent businesses, sharing resources and working together to promote the historic business community of German Village. Whether you’re planning a night out on our bricks or visiting for the weekend, you’ll find what you’re looking for when you click Shop. Dine. Stroll. above.
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Milos Klima
Klima is one of the striking fishing villages on the Greek island of Milos, with its little white houses built along the water. In the middle of the 19th century, these houses were owned by fishermen who used them as second homes and as boathouses. The fishermen usually lived in Plaka and left their boats here along the water. On the lower floor was storage for the boat, while on the top floor was living space and a place for the fisherman to sleep. During the 20th century, however, the function of the fishermen's cottages changed and became the second homes for the families of the fishermen. Today, these houses are rented to vacationers. Klima is accessible through Plaka and Trypiti. Unfortunately, parking can be difficult to find. You may have to park your car along the road, a hundred meters from the village, and walk by foot to the village. There are no beach bars or taverns. The only public place is the Hotel Panorama, which is slightly higher and a small distance away.
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Haapsalu Old Town
Haapsalu, which is bordered by the sea on three sides, fits on a piece of land with a size of just 10.59 km2. The Old Town is located on a peninsula with two eskers, which continue to the north-west as a chain of islets (holms) connected to the mainland. There are low meanders between the holms – Suur and Väike Viik. The culturally and environmentally valuable Old Town of Haapsalu can be divided into its medieval section and the 20th-century health resort area. The medieval part is around the Episcopal castle, with the medieval network of Kooli, Jaani, Vee, Linda, Rüütli and Väike-Mere Streets and buildings. It is surrounded by a belt of wooden houses and the Promenade, Aafrika beach and parks.