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German Village
And for family, friends, and visitors, it’s also a home away from home. That’s because you don’t have to live in German Village to live here. In German Village, its mission is simple: preserve, protect and promote life among the bricks. German Village Business Community is a collection of independent businesses, sharing resources and working together to promote the historic business community of German Village. Whether you’re planning a night out on our bricks or visiting for the weekend, you’ll find what you’re looking for when you click Shop. Dine. Stroll. above.
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Distillery Historic District
Toronto’s newest centre for arts, culture, food and entertainment. This national historic site includes 44 heritage buildings and numerous brick-lined courtyards. Explore the district’s many restaurants, art galleries, artisan boutiques, specialty retail stores and more.
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Empire State Building
The world-famous Empire State Building located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, our 86th and 102nd floor observatories provide unforgettable 360° views of New York City and beyond. Whether you’re in town for a week or a day, no visit to NYC is complete without experiencing the top of the Empire State Building. The Empire State Building is more than a spectacular view. It’s an immersive experience inside a world famous landmark. In addition to our Observation Decks, your visit includes the newly restored lobby with its stunning art deco ceiling murals, the historical Dare To Dream Exhibit, and the Sustainability Exhibit.
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Place Jacques-Cartier and Place De La Dauversiere
No stroll through Old Montréal would be complete without a stop at Place Jacques-Cartier, a lively spot steeped in heritage. A meeting place for centuries, Montrealers and visitors alike gather here to admire the view of the Old Port, sit for a spell at an outdoor terrasse, take in performances of the many street artists and enjoy entertainment at every time of year. In fact, one could say that Place Jacques-Cartier is at its most magical during the Christmas season. Today, Place Jacques-Cartier teems with artists, artisans, portrait painters and musicians, however it offers more than just entertainment: history buffs appreciate the Nelson Monument, a 35-metre column erected in 1809, as well as the black pavement denoting the outline of the Château de Vaudreuil, former 18th-century governor’s mansion in New France. Continue your stroll east along Notre-Dame Street and you will come to Place De La Dauversière, across from City Hall. Today, it is a magnificent public garden where passers-by like to while away the hours, immersed in its rich history that begins with the very founding of Montréal. Named in honour of Jérôme Le Royer de La Dauversière, founder of the Société de Notre-Dame, it was the site of the Lemoine-Despins family home in 1750, then of James McGill in 1805.
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Art District Montcalm
A perfect balance between bourgeois and bohemian, the Montcalm neighbourhood attracts epicureans, sports fans, and art and culture lovers in a magnificent historical environment. Head to the Upper Town for a highly entertaining and tasty experience! Stroll down avenue Cartier in the heart of the Art District and you’ll pass a hundred or so places of business. Enjoy the lively atmosphere, gourmet food shops, and fashionable and specialty boutiques of this less-touristy area. Bookstores, theatre, museums, movies, art galleries: in Montcalm there's something for culture lovers of every stripe. Don't forget to visit the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (MNBAQ), a real architectural gem showcasing both Québec and international art. To keep up with the latest films, head to Cinéma Cartier, the only movie theatre downtown; it can get pretty busy on weekends.
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Rue Saint Jean
A stroll along rue Saint-Jean is a must for anyone visiting Québec City. Starting from centrally located Place D’Youville, a string of boutiques, restaurants, churches, and historic buildings create a unique and eclectic ambiance. And when the street is closed to traffic in summer, pedestrians take over and a festive atmosphere reigns. Religion, politics, and education converge at Place de l’Hôtel-de-Ville, home to City Hall and just steps from Notre-Dame de Québec Cathedral-Basilica and the historic Séminaire de Québec. In summer, you can watch the performances of the public entertainers while the charming wooden kiosks of the German Christmas Market settle there from late November to end of December. The ice rink at Place D'Youville is the perfect place to experience Québec City's winter. From mid-November, put on skates and enjoy its magical atmosphere!
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Old Quebec
A UNESCO World Heritage treasure, Old Québec is the only fortified city north of Mexico. Bask in the European charm as you stroll through the old quarters and take in over 400 years of history in the birthplace of French North America.
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Petit Champlain District
Rue du Petit-Champlain, one of the oldest commercial streets in North America, is lined with one-of-a-kind boutiques and restaurants. The Petit-Champlain district isn’t just illuminated for the holidays—it stays decorated all winter long, much to everyone’s delight. It’s the ideal place to bundle up for a winter evening stroll in an enchanting atmosphere straight out of a Christmas fairy tale. The French influence is evident everywhere you look in Place Royale and along Rue du Petit-Champlain. The two—and three—storey plastered stone homes with their dormer windows, gabled roofs, large chimneys and firewalls rising above the rooftops make it hard to believe you’re not in France.
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Frenchmen Street
To this day, tour guides tell you that Frenchmen Street is an off the beaten gem, a ‘local’s Bourbon Street’ where the real New Orleanians gather to listen to live music and grab a drink. Excuse a bit of an eye roll on our part; That ‘locals-majority’ term may have rang true at the beginning of the twenty-teens, and to a degree, it’s an accurate description of Frenchmen throughout the 90s and much of the noughties. But the street really achieved a critical mass of popularity post-Katrina, and in the past few years, Frenchmen is tourist central come the evening, especially on weekends. On Frenchmen Street, certain things are just guaranteed: proximity to good music, good food, interesting culture, and an unbeatable street scene.
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Royal Street
For a full 13 blocks, Royal Street runs parallel to Bourbon Street, yet this thoroughfare – one of the finest stretches of art galleries, antique stores, wrought iron balconies, restaurants and architecture in the USA – is sometimes almost completely missed by visitors. This is a real shame; beyond the qualities we’ve just described, Royal Street makes a nice counterbalance to the neon and noise of Bourbon.
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Bourbon Street
This street is a tourism destination for a reason. It’s a thoroughfare with an utterly fascinating history, home to some of the oldest bars, family-run restaurants and gay entertainment districts in the country. In short, while there’s plenty to discover off of Bourbon, there’s a lot to discover on the iconic street as well that may surprise those travelers who turn their nose up at all the flashing lights.
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Jackson Square
Historic Jackson Square, originally known in the 18th century as "Place d'Armes," and later renamed in honor of the Battle of New Orleans hero Andrew Jackson, is a timeless attraction in the heart of the French Quarter of New Orleans. This famous landmark facing the Mississippi River is surrounded by historic buildings, including the St. Louis Cathedral, the Presbytere and Cabildo (Louisiana State Museums), not to mention the Lower and Upper Pontalba Apartments, the oldest apartment buildings in the United States. The Pontalba Apartments offer retail shops, museums, galleries and restaurants on the ground level; their second and third floors still house a selection of prestigious apartments. For well over a half-century, there has been an open-air artist colony at Jackson Square. Local artists paint, draw, create portraits, caricatures, and display their work on the square's iron fence. Some have been there for generations! Jackson Square is a favorite site for visitors and locals. The artists, restaurants, museums, merchants and the square itself make Jackson Square one of the French Quarter's most popular destinations.
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Garden District
Love at first sight is a common experience for first time visitors to the Garden District. It often goes something like this: they’re traveling up St. Charles Avenue via the streetcar when they get their first glance of the oak tree lined streets and historic homes. You can tell by the pristine look on their faces, that the Garden District has started a new found romance. The romance blooms as the afternoon is spent exploring memories of New Orleans’ antebellum past, gazing at secluded mansions, wandering down the brick lined sidewalks. Its canopy of oak trees is world-famous, while its characteristic gardens of hibiscuses and crepe myrtles, angel trumpets and bougainvillea, make it one of New Orleans' most beautiful neighborhoods. The Garden District has worked its magic again.
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Exchange District
One of Canada’s architectural marvels, this 30-block district boasts North America’s most extensive (and handsome) turn of the 20th century buildings. While walking its charming streets you’ll find some of the city’s trendiest and tastiest spots including small plate restaurants and bistros who flaunt their exposed brick and beam, up-and-coming and established galleries, vintage and antique shops and some of the best the city has to offer in coffee and café culture. Also find an unparalleled collection of independent shops, locally made goods, delightfully curated vintage, and Winnipeg’s longest operating toy-store. The Exchange District is the perfect place to discover something new.
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16th Street Mall
Built in 1982, the Mall is a tree-lined, pedestrian promenade of red-and-grey granite that runs through the center of Downtown and is lined with outdoor cafes, renovated historic office buildings, sparkling glass-walled skyscrapers, shops, restaurants and retail stores. Numerous fountains and plazas offer a variety of daily special events and entertainers. Free shuttle buses cruise the mile-long Mall seven days a week.
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Taxco
It is a small but charming “Magical Town”, just 4 hours away from Acapulco, nestled in an area surrounded by great hills and mountains, thanks to the intense exploitation of its silver deposits. Its people still live from the commerce and manufacture of objects that the precious metal alloys; the baroque constructions raised during the mining boom of the Colony are still preserved. Any terrace is good to contemplate those jewels of the past, the new and small must be sought among the cobbled streets that go up and down everywhere. In addition, Taxco has a peculiar beauty, because this magnificent Magical Town has the ability to transport us to another time and space, just to the time of colonial Mexico. Its beautiful cobblestone streets are characterized by its inclination, and almost all of them lead to beautiful little squares where it is possible to walk, visit the kiosk or sit on one of their benches.
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Carlisle Old Town Hall
A prominent two-storey Grade I Listed Building of Medieval origin, the Old Town Hall mostly dates from the 17th and 18th centuries. 1345 is the earliest reference to the predecessor of the building, variously termed the ‘Tollbooth’, 'Common Hall’ and ‘Motehall’ or ‘Moot Hall’ in later medieval sources. In 1668 the medieval hall was demolished to make way for a new one on the same site. It is this building, finished in 1669, with numerous subsequent alterations and extensions which survives today. Over the years, the ground floor of the building has consistently remained in commercial and retail use whilst the grander public rooms at first-floor level have accommodated a number of important civic functions including, most notably the Courts of Assize until 1881, the City’s Magistrates Court until 1941, and Council Chamber and offices of the City of Carlisle Corporation until 1964.
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Bruges By Horse-drawn Carriage
The half-hour carriage ride along Bruges’ historic winding streets trots off on Markt (at Burg on Wednesday morning). Halfway through the ride the carriage briefly stops at the Beguinage. The coachman gives expert commentary en route.
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Bruges by Boat
A visit to Bruges isn’t complete without a boat trip on its canals. Go aboard at any of the five landing stages for a half-hour trip that allows you to appreciate the most noteworthy delights of the city from a completely different angle. March to mid-November: daily 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m. (last departure at 5.30 p.m.).
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Kuiperspoort
As the name suggests, the Kuipers Guild used to be located in the Kuiperspoort. It is a beautiful courtyard that you pass if you don't pay attention. The Kuiperspoort can be found between the Dam and the Rouaanse Kaai. The houses there are mainly from the second half of the sixteenth century. In the first half of the seventeenth century, the courtyard was bought by the Kuipersgilde. Several companies are now located in the former Kuiper houses, including the Walcheren art education foundation, where various painting and drawing lessons can be taken.
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Grand Place of Tournai
The Grand Place of Tournai, a place of relaxation in a prestigious setting. Taste the conviviality of a Grand-Place animated by the terraces of numerous cafes and restaurants. From the rue Saint-Martin, the rue des Maux or the Place de l'Eveche, join one of the most beautiful and authentic Grand Place in the country! Triangular in shape, it is the perfect place to enjoy one of our typical dishes or one of our local beers. On sunny days, it's a whole neighborhood that comes alive, rocked by the sound of water jets and child players. The terraces fill up, the little sweet pleasures are tasted, the chime sounds for the delight of music lovers. Place of exchange, market and events, the Grand Place radiates throughout the City of 5 Clochers!
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Belfry of Tournai
The Belfry of Tournai, listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, is the oldest in Belgium. True watchtower since the 12th century, it overlooks the Grand Place of Tournai of its 72 meters high. After having climbed the 257 steps, the top of the Belfry offers you the most beautiful panorama of the city and its surroundings! The Belfry has long played an important role in the city of Tournai: watchtower, prison, steeple, city hall ... It previously symbolized the communal freedoms and its bell, called "Bancloque", warned the population of the trials, executions, invasions or fires. After being renovated for 10 years (1992-2002), the Belfry allows you to discover its history through didactic panels, the dungeon, the carillonneur's room and the carillon that resonates in the city every Sunday in summer.
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Jordaan
The Jordaan is possibly the most famous neighbourhood in the Netherlands. Akin to the reputation enjoyed by London’s Cockneys, this once working-class bastion was renowned for tight community bonds, radical politics and a love for drink and over-the-top sing-a-longs. Gentrification of decades past has attracted more galleries, restaurants, specialty shops and upwardly-mobile residents to its scenic streets but there’s undeniably still a distinct atmosphere to be enjoyed here. The Jordaan begins at Brouwersgracht, just west of the Amsterdam Central Station and arches around the western side of Canal Ring between Prinsengracht and Lijnbaansgracht before ending at Leidsegracht. The area north of Rozengracht is a more ‘touristy’ and commercial section, although the quieter area to the south is no less scenic.
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Gammelstad Church Town
Gammelstad Church Town was included in UNESCO's World Heritage List in 1996, and is thereby covered by "The Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage". The objects on the World Heritage List all bear unique testimony to the history of the world and mankind. They are invaluable to humanity and must be preserved for posterity. The list contains about 750 cultural and natural environments of which the Great Wall of China, the Great Barrier Reef of Australia and Sveaborg outside Helsinki are among the better known. As well as Gammelstad Church Town, Norrbotten also has the World Heritage Laponia, which is the largest area of wilderness in Europe. Gammelstad is an outstanding example of a Northern Scandinavian church town. More than 400 cottages, which were used on Sundays and during major religious festivals, markets and local courts, are grouped around the late medieval stone church in Gammelstad. The cottages served as an overnight stop for parishioners who lived too far away to make the journey to the church and back in one day. The City of Luleå was founded around the old church in the 17th century. Today Gammelstad consists of a unique assortment of church cottages, year-round dwellings and public buildings. The church cottages are still used in a traditional way.
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Nyhavn
Nyhavn is the perfect place to end a long day. With a cold one on the quay like the locals, or at one of the many restaurants. Originally, Nyhavn was a busy commercial port where ships from all over the world would dock. The area was packed with sailors, ladies of pleasure, pubs and alehouses. Today the beautiful old houses have been renovated and restaurants dominate the old port. Nyhavn is filled with people enjoying the relaxed atmosphere by the canal, jazz music and great food. The famous Danish fairytale writer, Hans Christian Andersen, used to live in no. 20. This is where he wrote the fairy-tales 'The Tinderbox', 'Little Claus and Big Claus', and 'The Princess and the Pea'. He also lived twenty years in no. 67 and two years in no. 18. During Christmas, Nyhavn sets the perfectly Christmas-lit setting for your holiday in Copenhagen. The cafés and restaurants offer Danish Christmas delicacies and the annual Christmas market fills the cobbled street with decorated stalls. A classic Christmas experience.
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Old Town Eskilstuna
The Old Town is one of Eskilstuna's oldest and most well-preserved areas. Here there is very beautiful architecture to take part in and the area houses several attractions and opportunities for shopping. The cobblestoned Köpmangatan with cultural buildings from the 18th century extends along the river in the Old Town. There are narrow alleys and beautiful views from the gates down to the river. Along Köpmangatan there were once workshops and tanneries, today the street is surrounded by a variety of small unique shops, salons, flea markets, cafes and restaurants. Feel free to stop and relax and enjoy the atmosphere. Good food and drink can be found in the area's cosy restaurants and cafes.
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The Medina (Walled Town)
This is the original centre of the city. Abderramán III, Almería founded in 955 (10th century), by constructing a wall around the heart of the town, building a fortress to defend the city, and provide a mosque for prayer. It extended from the Avenue of the Sea to Queen Street. The route crossed diagonally from the main gateway (at the beginning of Queen Street ) to Sortida or Socorro (at Socorro Street), passing through Pechina or Real de la Almedina street, which were within the preserved route of Caliphate medina. This area can be best described as streets and alleys, where there were no free spaces for squares nor little squares. The squares are found around the Great Mosque, whereas the shopping district was formed for alhóndigas, souks and bazaars. Within here the Alcaicería (luxury shopping district) stood. The shipyard, located in the area of the current Atarazanas street, occupied an important space at the south-eastern tip of the medina. There were many neighbourhoods around this area, each with its small mosque, as in the case of existing in the current Hermitage of San Antón.
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Knappingsborg Quarter
A unique environment in Norrkoping City. A historic neighbourhood where the oldest buildings are from 1767. Now you can shop, snack, eat and enjoy life in Knäppingsborg. No matter from which direction visitors enter the neighbourhood, they encounter the exciting contrast between streets full of intimacy and the light from the three squares. Each square has its distinct identity, where companies gathered that strengthen each other. And in the cosy streets are stores where knowledgeable staff provides visitors with both personal service and friendly smiles. The same closeness and warmth greet the visitor in the alleys and outside windows in a Knäppingsborg who brought Norrköping unique qualities. Happy friends and acquaintances can exchange a few words with each other. From the squares seating, it is nice to just observe people. Others choose to relax at a café or on a terrace. Here at this unique setting next to the stream people come to listen to music without having to go to a concert and to see art without having to go to an art exhibition.
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Place Bellecour
It’s the largest pedestrian square in Europe. So whether you want to get to the Tourist Information centre inside, join a march, jump on the big wheel, or just simply sit, this oversized square reinvigorates the lungs and stretches the horizons. As the central focus of shopping on the presqu’île and the chosen starting point for most city visits, Bellecour is the kilometre 0 of Lyon and all distances are calculated from it. Four major streets start from this famous square: rue de la République, which takes you up to Hôtel de Ville and the Opera; rue Victor Hugo and rue du Plat both leading to Perrache; and rue du Président Édouard Herriot, with a concentration of luxury shops all the way to the Place des Terreaux. Surrounded by linden trees, wild cherries and beautiful Napoleonic buildings, Place Bellecour is the third largest square in France after Place des Quinconces in Bordeaux and Place de la Concorde in Paris, measuring 312m by 200m, not to mention the biggest pedestrian square in the whole of Europe. Fact.
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Gamla Stan
Gamla Stan, the Old Town, is one of the largest and best preserved medieval city centers in Europe, and one of the foremost attractions in Stockholm. This is where Stockholm was founded in 1252. All of Gamla Stan and the adjacent island of Riddarholmen are like a living pedestrian-friendly museum full of sights, attractions, restaurants, cafés, bars, and places to shop. Gamla Stan is also popular with aficionados of handicrafts, curious, and souvenirs. The narrow winding cobblestone streets, with their buildings in so many different shades of gold, give Gamla Stan its unique character. Even now cellar vaults and frescoes from the Middle Ages can be found behind the visible facades, and on snowy winter days, the district feels like something from a storybook.
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Old Town Hall and St. Sebastian Church
The baroque backdrop for the market held here three times a week is formed by the ensemble of the old town hall and the parish church of St. Sebastian - which is incidentally Mannheim's oldest building. If you happen to lose track of time in the hustle and bustle of the market, two clocks and a bell tower are on hand to bring you back to the here and now. What's more, a glockenspiel sounds from the tower three times a day, charming more people than merely the wedding couple exchanging vows inside the walls. You can immerse yourself in Mannheim's internationality directly behind the marketplace. The predominantly Turkish-influenced district with its small shops and delicacies like baklava and pide can easily turn your thoughts to your next holiday. The huge selection of bridal and evening wear on offer here draws customers from over 150 kilometers away.
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Gothic Quarter
The Gothic Quarter is one of the most famous landmarks in Barcelona. Located in the heart of the old city, this neighborhood features a fusion of buildings dating from Roman times to the 20th century. The main attribute of the Gothic Quarter is the antique aspect of its buildings, narrow streets and the near absence of traffic. In fact, many areas are for pedestrians only and built like a labyrinth of winding streets and hidden squares.
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Geneva Old Town
The Vieille-Ville is the largest historic town in Switzerland, and is dominated by St. Peter's Cathedral, the symbolic location of the Reformation. Climb the 157 steps to the top of the tower for a unique panorama of the city. Then take a stroll in the charming surrounding alleys and passageways, each telling its own story about Geneva's history.
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Pori Old Town Hall
Presents Neoclassicism and it is one of the few buildings that survived the 1852 fire. One of the most valued buildings in Pori is the Old Town Hall designed by Carl Ludvig Engel, completed in 1841. Situated in the city centre on Hallituskatu. The English-style Old Town Hall Park located in front of it is one of the oldest parks in the city, and the location was originally home to a market square until the late 19th century. The Old Town Hall originally housed the city’s administration and courts; nowadays, the premises are used for dignified occasions. There is a restaurant in the basement.