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Shopping in Madrid

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Plaza Mayor
This portico lined square is situated at the heart of Hapsburg Madrid, the old part of the city and one of the capital’s most charming districts. Before Madrid became a capital city, with its wide avenues and boulevards, its footprint consisted of narrow streets, alleys and passageways, which today take us back to the times of swashbuckling swordsmen and medieval rogues. The foundations of Plaza Mayor were laid, when Philip II's court moved to Madrid, on the site of the former Plaza del Arrabal, where the town's most popular market was located towards the end of the 15th century. In 1617, architect Juan Gómez de Mora was commissioned to create a greater uniformity amongst the buildings in this location, which for centuries had hosted popular entertainments, bullfights, beatifications, coronations and the occasional auto de fe.
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Market of San Miguel
Opened in May 1916 as a food market, this centenary establishment (one of the city’s few and best examples of iron architecture) became Madrid’s first gastronomy market in May 2009. Throughout 2018, the market will undergo a period of consolidation of much of its gastronomy contents. Located in the centre of Los Austrias Madrid and with over 10 million visitors a year, the San Miguel Market is the city’s gastronomic temple, the contemporary essence of all the corners of Spanish cuisine. From the best Iberian ham to fresh seafood brought from Galicia each day, the Mediterranean rice or the special cheese from Castile, Asturias or the Basque Country. The finest products and wine from the length and breadth of Spain are divided among 30 permanent stands and 3 in a portable format.
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San Sebastian Old Town
Tradition and modernity are brought together in one of the most special areas of the city. Stroll through the fishing port and lose yourself in the streets of the Historical Quarter where the smell of pintxos emanates from every corner. Cross the Boulevard and leap through time to land in the centre of Donostia, and visit its pedestrian streets and spend a few hours shopping in its lovely shops and boutiques.
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Hippy Market
Have you heard about Ibiza's famous Hippy Market? It's one of the island top attractions and a must-see for every holidaymaker. But that's not the only market you can visit, there are many happening all over the island, so wherever you stay you can enjoy a fabulous shopping experience. Ibiza has strong artistic roots going back to the early '60s when artisans, painters and designers flocked to the island to experience its unique atmosphere, incredible light and freedom of expression. All this comes through in the markets held on the island where handmade items of clothing, jewellery and artefacts can be bought. The biggest markets are the Punta Arabí Hippy Market on Wednesday in Es Caná and the Las Dalias Hippy Market on Saturday in San Carlos.n. All this comes through in the markets held on the island where handmade items of clothing, jewellery and artefacts can be bought.
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La Boqueria Market
The most visited market in Barcelona is without a doubt La Boqueria, the first market to open in the city. If you’re looking to experiment the daily life of locals, nothing comes as close as visiting the Barcelona city markets. They’re bright, colorful, busy and noisy places, and in most of them you can find practically any product you can imagine. Located next to La Rambla in the Gothic Quarter District, it has become one of the city’s milestones, an essential piece into Barcelona’s biggest attractions.La Boqueria is not just a regular market, but a social and gastronomical experience. Beside the market stalls, there is a lot more going on, and you can find every possible option to eat and drink. As you start walking to the entrance, get ready to experiment a feast for the senses. When planning your visit, better do it before lunchtime, when the market is in fully alive.
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The Saint Pierre District
Tourists who come to Bordeaux generally marvel at the beautiful buildings lining the quays before seeing anything else. However, many of them are unaware that the historic heart of Bordeaux is located behind the 18th century Place de la Bourse.
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The Old Medina
If this is your first visit, you should take a long walk through the old Medina, it's very entertaining, full of life, and apart from learning history and Tetuan culture, you can buy genuine local crafts. The Tetouan Medina is a UNESCO World Heritage place and it's well worth it!
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Old Town of Nice
The Old Town of Nice is made up of tall tenement houses lined up along narrow and dark streets. The ground floors are occupied by restaurants, shops and galleries of local artists. You can buy everything here, from Provence spices to hand-made jewelry and cosmetics. Just go in and let yourself be carried away by the past, which is still present in this place. The Old Town of Nice (Vieille Ville), also called Old Nice (Vieux Nice), lies just below the Castle Hill. In the south, it borders with the Promenade des Anglais, and in the north with the Paillon River, or rather the Promenade of Paillon, because the river has been flowing through the city in the underground channel since 1972. The names of streets in the Old Town are written in two versions: in French and in the local Nissart dialect (niçart). The Old Town of Nice is full of historic tenements, churches and squares. A walk through the narrow and shaded streets allows you to almost move in time and feel the spirit of Old Nice. You just need to know where to look for it.
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Alghero Old Town
“Alghero Vecchia” is the charming old town, surrounded by seven great towers and the old walls that still stand at the sea edge and which date back to the Catalan-Aragonese conquests in the sixteenth century. The narrow cobbled streets and alleys of the Old Town are abuzz with people and activities until late at night. Summer and spring are the peak seasons when the whole city comes to life. The car-free zone of this historic centre is perfect for enjoying a leisurely stroll where you can find perfect gifts in the many small shops, sample local produce in the bars and restaurants and visit the old churches. The fifteenth century palaces, the Civic Theatre with its neoclassic façade, the cathedral and the sixteenth century bell tower of Santa Maria are all representative of a long Sardinian legacy and even the houses of the centre of Alghero stood through the bombings of the Second World War. The outer wall of the Old Town is part of a long walkway which stretches from one end of Alghero to another and provides a fabulous panorama of the Riviera which is most appreciated at sunset when you can admire the silhouette of the headland of Capo Caccia
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Jemaa El Fna Square
There is nowhere in Morocco like the Jemaa el Fna Square – no place that so easily involves you and allows you to stay coming back for more. By day, most of the place is just a large open space, where a handful of snakes charming bewitched their cobras with flutes, medical men (especially in the north-east of the square) display cures and Panaceous, and tooth-pullers, wielding fearsome claws, offering to wrest pain from the heads of people suffering from toothache, trays of extracts attesting molars their skills. It's only in the afternoon that the square really happens. At dusk, as in France and Spain, people go out for a walk early evening (especially in the street Bab Agnaou), and the place fills up little by little until it becomes a carnival all of storytellers, Acrobats, musicians and artists. Go down and you will soon be immersed in the ritual: wandering around, crouching in the midst of spectator circles, giving a dirham or two as your contribution. If you want a break, you can walk to the rooftop terraces, such as the Grand Balcon Café, for a view of the square, its storytellers and musicians, and the crowds that come to see them.
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Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II
The Galleria, a place of transit for busy managers or a stop for enchanted and curious tourists, expresses the various faces of the city through its many facets. As soon as it was finished, the Galleria became immediately famous for its large size, extraordinary for the time and sign of a new era. Taking that classic wander through the Galleria, the very heart of the city, as visitors have done for many years, still creates that wonderful sensation. Entering the Galleria, the corridor between Duomo and La Scala Theatre, its magnificent arch welcomes you and hints at the Milanese spectacle that lies within. The original idea of the designers was to create a porticoed street that would function as a showcase and offer somewhere to take a pleasant stroll, enjoy an aperitif or have dinner after the opera. Today it can still be considered the “parlour” of the city, a place where you relax and enjoy a coffee at the bar Camparino, let yourself be enchanted by the cute hats of Borsalino and the collections of Prada and Louis Vuitton, or stop for an aperitif at Savini.
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Bahnhofstrasse
One of Zurich's must-dos is a stroll along the sleek storefronts of Bahnhofstrasse. Stretching across Old Town from Hauptbahnhof station to Lake Zurich, Bahnhofstrasse features a variety of high-end shops, including Louis Vuitton, Burberry, Chanel and Giorgio Armani. Swiss shops like the dessert-focused Confiserie Sprungli and the jewelry-centric Gubelin AG can also be found here. According to recent travelers, if it's budget shopping you're after, head to the Niederdorf and Langstrasse areas instead of Bahnhofstrasse. Though Bahnhofstrasse is free to visit, this shopping area is better suited for window shopping, unless you're prepared to drop some serious cash during your visit.
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Grand Place of Tournai
The Grand Place of Tournai, a place of relaxation in a prestigious setting. Taste the conviviality of a Grand-Place animated by the terraces of numerous cafes and restaurants. From the rue Saint-Martin, the rue des Maux or the Place de l'Eveche, join one of the most beautiful and authentic Grand Place in the country! Triangular in shape, it is the perfect place to enjoy one of our typical dishes or one of our local beers. On sunny days, it's a whole neighborhood that comes alive, rocked by the sound of water jets and child players. The terraces fill up, the little sweet pleasures are tasted, the chime sounds for the delight of music lovers. Place of exchange, market and events, the Grand Place radiates throughout the City of 5 Clochers!
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Alice's Shop
A fundamental part of the tales of Alice in Wonderland, Alice’s Shop features in the original story written by Lewis Carroll. Situated across the road from Alice’s childhood home, the Oxford University college of Christ Church, Alice’s Shop was Alice’s sweet shop 150 years ago and was written into Alice’s adventures. Illustrator of Through the Looking-Glass, Sir John Tenniel, sketched two illustrations of the shop for the original book. An entire episode in the story even takes place in the shop. Oxford is the birthplace of Alice in Wonderland and many inspirations for the stories came from Oxford. Alice’s Shop is the most tangible link to an episode in the book that is still in existence today, and when you step into Alice’s Shop you are stepping into the Victorian world of Alice.
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Ponte Vecchio
Open all of the time, along the pedestrian zone south of Piazza della Repubblica towards Palazzo Pitti Built very close to the Roman crossing, the Ponte Vecchio, or Old Bridge, was the only bridge across the Arno in Florence until 1218. The current bridge was rebuilt after a flood in 1345. During World War II it was the only bridge across the Arno that the fleeing Germans did not destroy. Instead they blocked access by demolishing the medieval buildings on each side. On November 4, 1966, the bridge miraculously withstood the tremendous weight of water and silt when the Arno once again burst its banks. It is also possible to admire the bridge from underneath in theater presentations, the occasional concert and boat rides. After the disaster in 2016, there is talk of turning the work road constructed during the rebuilding of the river walls int a park area, where it will be possible to stroll the river banks and get a close-up view of the bridge.
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Markt
Markt is the heart of the city and surrounded by many historical highlights. It is filled with pedestrians and bicyclists and a perfect place to get some rest or food in a local restaurant. Markt is dominated by its Belfry, for centuries the city’s foremost edifice and the perfect look-out in case of war, fire or any other calamity. You can still climb to the top of the tower! The statue of Jan Breydel and Pieter de Coninck graces the middle of the square. These two popular heroes of Bruges resisted French oppression and consequently played an important part during the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. Their statue neatly looks out onto the Gothic revival style Provincial Palace. Until the 18th century this used to be the extremely busy Waterhalle, a covered warehouse where goods were loaded and unloaded along the canals that ran alongside the square. Today the canals are still there, albeit underground.
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Bregenz Upper Town
Bregenz’s Upper Town seems more than just a steep city path away from the touristic hubbub by the lake or the hectic shopping world of the city centre. Even from far away one sees the old city walls, which – depending on one’s character – have a threatening or calming impression on the visitors. As soon as one arrives at the entrance, the historic city gate, one leaves the modern world outside. Historic coats of arms, a mummified shark and the relief of a Celtic goddess immediately plunge everyone into a mystical, mythical world and make them think of time periods in which cults, wars and heretics were commonplace.
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Byard Art
Contemporary gallery Byard Art is located in the historic centre of Cambridge, opposite King’s College Chapel. Its innovative exhibition programme of solo and mixed shows by contemporary artists offers a unique selection of two and three-dimensional work, all in a friendly and welcoming environment. All of Byard Art artwork is original, and varies in medium, scale and price.
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Brindleyplace
Tree-lined squares, International cuisine and an enviable canalside location make Brindleyplace one of Birmingham’s most exciting destinations. Brindleyplace is perfectly positioned next to Arena Birmingham (formally the NIA) and the International Convention Centre (ICC) home to the Symphony Hall making it an ideal place for a pre-concert meal and drinks. It is also well connected being just a ten minute walk from Birmingham New Street Station and just off Broad Street which is served by local buses.
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Bullring & Grand Central
Bullring & Grand Central is the glamorous heart of Birmingham and home to one of the country’s most popular shopping destinations. Discover over 240 of the most imaginative and desirable shops, catering for all your fashion and lifestyle needs – including Selfridges, John Lewis and Debenhams department stores – all right here, in the centre of town.
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Grote Markt
Grote Markt originally was a forum or square just outside the medieval residential quarter. In 1220 Duke Henry I of Brabant (1165-1235) donated this community land to the city. The name Merckt was used for the first time in 1310. Around this time the first annual markets or foren van Brabant (Brabant fairs) were organised. Here English merchants would do business with Italians, Spaniards and merchants from the Northern German Hanseatic cities as well as from Southern Germany and Flemings of course. At the end of the fifteenth century Antwerp overtook Bruges as the most prominent city of the Low Countries.
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Trastevere
Trastevere is one of the most pleasant neighbourhoods in the city. Its peaceful and bohemian atmosphere is capable of dazzling tourists without failing to attract assiduous Roman citizens. The life of the neighbourhood is especially concentrated around the Piazza di Santa Maria in Trastevere, where you can see the ancient Basilica of Our Lady in Trastevere. The great fountain in front of the temple serves as a meeting place, a resting spot, or simply somewhere to have an ice cream on a hot day. A walk through the narrow cobbled streets of the Trastevere shows hidden treasures such as modest medieval churches, small shops with the most unusual objects, or even some scenes of everyday life seemingly taken from a forgotten age.
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Shrewsbury Market Hall
Beneath Shrewsbury’s iconic clocktower is the town’s award-winning indoor market. Cosmopolitan cafés, artisan producers, vintage sellers, quality gift boutiques, artists and craftspeople all thrive alongside traditional fresh fruit and veg stalls and family butchers who have been trading for up to 100 years. Diners can enjoy some of the most creative food in town – authentic Beijing dumplings at a Chinese tea house, champagne and oysters at a continental-style seafood bar, Spanish tapas, sizzling Thai street food and more. The market is home to a community of talented artists and skilled craftspeople. Watch weavers, jewellery makers and artists at work. There is even a resident art gallery. A retro and vintage trail embraces clothing, collectables, antiques, books and vinyl records And if that’s not enough, visitors can indulge in chocolates made by our national award-winning chocolatier, buy a bicycle or get a quick make-over at Risdon’s barbershop. Main trading days are Tuesday, Wednesday, Fridays and Saturday, although some stallholders also trade on Thursday.
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The Lanes
Get lost in Leicester’s Lanes, whose winding cobbled streets bristle with fantastic independent stores. Selling everything from classic styles to one-off pieces to make a statement in your home or wardrobe, The Lanes has something to suit all tastes.
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Hof and Koerbergasse
Located between the Puppenbrunnen, the city hall and the Bahkauv, the Hof square has something to offer everyone, and is a good place to spend a few hours with its restaurants, bars and cafés. Take a break here, lean back and take it easy, Aachen-style. Starting from the Hof, walk down the Medieval-style Körbergasse, past the traditionalist Plum’s Kaffee coffee roasting house and the basket weaver’s “Korb Bayer”, which first opened its doors in 1865, until you reach a symbol of the city: the “Printenmädchen”, or “little gingerbread girl”. Now enter Aachen’s oldest coffee shop, the Alt Aachener Café-Stuben van den Daele, which was founded in 1890. The rooms, which are full of nooks and crannies, and the many stairs in this historic building, give the café its particular charm.
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Planken shopping area
Mannheim's window to the world and the most popular pedestrian area in the entire region. The main shopping street in the heart of Mannheim's squares stretches for 800 meters from the water tower "Wasserturm" to the square "Paradeplatz". Strolling in a relaxed atmosphere, shopping and simply discovering something new is a combination that makes the "Planken" a magnet for visitors way beyond the region. Countless retailers from every sector mix with traditional department stores to leave no wish unfulfilled. Individual style, niche products or high fashion - Mannheim's Planken offer everything and more.
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Rialto Bridge and its Market
The Rialto Bridge is the first one built across the Grand Canal. In the beginning it was a wooden drawbridge to permit sailing ships to sail from St. Marks Basin to Piazzale Roma area. Only in 1588 the bridge was rebuilt in a sort of white marble called istrian stone, a trademark for most of Venetian artworks (an opera by Arch. Antonio da Ponte) until 1854 the only one spanning across the Grand Canal. It’ s 22 meters wide and 48 meters long a unique arcade 7,5 meters high, crowned by several smaller arcades it’ s crossed with three parallel staircases, The one in the centre has double arcades on both sides, shops and stores are host below the archway, on the niches. The Rialto area is well known for its famous market, open every day (Sunday closed), from San Polo area to the bridge. The market Is frequented mostly by venetian citizens, a continuous passage of people, boats and carriage of fruits, vegetables and fish make of it the most alive part of the city, many tipical trattoria and osterie, serving local wines and food can be founded around, simple but delicious dishes. Venetian called it “Erbaria” and sice ever it has been the main marketplace of the city, in the past ( now the wholesale market has been moved to another part of the city) dozen and dozen of boats loaded with all kind of goodies from the islands and mainland cultivations.
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Saint Mark's Square
Saint Mark’s Square is surely a place that can’t be missed, an exhibition of rare and unique beauty appear on a 360° view in front of the visitors, the Saint Mark’s Church, the bell tower, the “procuratie” and the Napoleonic wing, the clock tower and the two blacks. The Church, a Romanic Byzantine style was born initially as a mausoleum of the Patron Saint, it has 5 domes, marbles and mosaics to embellish the façade, inside, decorations and wall of golden leaf mosaics represents tales of the Patron Saint. The bell tower is the highest point of the city, 98.6 meters tall, from the top there is a unique and breathtaking view of the isle, it was originally built as a watchtower and a lighthouse in the IX century. Finally the clock tower, also a renaissance style palace, its arcade allow to enter into the square from the “Mercerie” so called because during the Republic there where many shops selling precious merchandise coming from distant ports. Today the Mercerie are site for various commercial activities, mostly murano glass shops and most modern cloth and gift shops.
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Maria-Theresien-Strasse
Take a stroll, do a bit of shopping, meet friends, sit at one of the many outdoor cafés, admire the magnificent Baroque architecture and savour the city panorama. This is Maria Theresien Street today. But when the street was founded over 700 hundred years ago, there were only a few farm houses here in the New Town. Life still revolved around the Old Town, which was surrounded by powerful medieval city walls and was only accessible from Maria Theresien Street through the St. Jörgen Gate. Today, this marks the start of Herzog Friedrich Straße – the road that leads to the Golden Roof. However, is wasn’t long before members of the aristocracy began building homes just outside the city gates. The location was much more practical thanks to its close proximity to the local rulers of the time – and the new townhouses were also much more comfortable than the draughty old castles outside of town. During the Baroque period, many of these new houses were converted into magnificent palatial residences. And they are still a delight to behold today, for example Palais Gumpp, the seat of the Tyrolean government, or Palais Trapp directly opposite with its enchanting inner courtyard and café.
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Swarovski Crystal Worlds
World famous & wonderful: Swarovski Crystal Worlds, located just 20 kilometres east of the Capital of the Alps, awaits with new and exciting attractions. Between 2013 and 2015, the worlds of art and culture, entertainment and shopping were extended to cover an area of 7.5 hectares. The “Home of the Giant” now inspires with a new poetic garden, which features a unique Crystal Cloud made from 800,000 hand-mounted and enchanted floating crystals. This mystical masterpiece is the largest of its kind worldwide and with it Swarovski has set the new standard for brilliantly implemented installations. The Crystal Cloud draws visitors to the Mirror Pool where the sparkling light of the crystals is captured to form a sea of stars both day and night.
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Jordaan
The Jordaan is possibly the most famous neighbourhood in the Netherlands. Akin to the reputation enjoyed by London’s Cockneys, this once working-class bastion was renowned for tight community bonds, radical politics and a love for drink and over-the-top sing-a-longs. Gentrification of decades past has attracted more galleries, restaurants, specialty shops and upwardly-mobile residents to its scenic streets but there’s undeniably still a distinct atmosphere to be enjoyed here. The Jordaan begins at Brouwersgracht, just west of the Amsterdam Central Station and arches around the western side of Canal Ring between Prinsengracht and Lijnbaansgracht before ending at Leidsegracht. The area north of Rozengracht is a more ‘touristy’ and commercial section, although the quieter area to the south is no less scenic.
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Dam Square
Dam Square is Amsterdam’s beating heart. Nowadays Dam Square in contrast with the old days it is now a very peaceful square which is home to scores of pigeons and street performers. Dam Square has had a turbulent history. Around 1270 a damn was constructed in this spot in the river Amstel. Dam Square was once the central marketplace of Amsterdam where literally everything under the moon was sold. The Royal Palace and the Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam are also situated at Dam Square. Other nearby highlights are the red light district, the narrowest house in Amsterdam at Singel 7 and the shopping mall Magna Plaza.
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Farmers Markets
The most trendy of the Amsterdam markets, has began in 1987 when Adri Vallentin, then owner of the popular cafe called Winkel (English: Shop) on the Noordermarkt, has setup nine biological food stalls, hoping to draw more clients on Saturday morning to his cafe. Traditional market of pigeons and canaries, which for a century stood on Noordermarkt each Saturday morning faltered, but the idea of biological food quickly picked up with the public, and today The Farmers Market on the Noordermarkt is so popular, that it draws crowds not only from the nearby Jordaan, but also from the whole city
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Trinity Leeds
Trinity Leeds is the city’s biggest shopping and leisure destination with over 120 shops, cafes, bars, restaurants and is home to the only Everyman cinema in the north of England....a must-visit for all film lovers. Housed under a giant iconic glass roof, Trinity Leeds is located in the heart of the city between Briggate and Albion Street. Covering 3 floors and open 7 days a week you can shop late night until 8 pm from Monday – Saturday and then go on to enjoy dinner and a drink at over 20 superb bars and restaurants late into the night.
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Getreidegasse
The Getreidegasse is the bustling heart of Salzburg’s Old City, its unmistakable charm as well as Mozart’s Birthplace making it an irresistible destination for countless visitors from around the world. Aside from an array of international fashion chains, the Getreidegasse also charms passers-by with its traditional inns and unique businesses steeped in history. Through-houses are very typical of the Salzburg historical district. The front and back of the buildings let directly out onto different streets, with an arcaded passageway connecting the two. Today, they often also feature artworks, art galleries and shops. The most famous of these is at the Schatz House, leading from No. 3 Getreidegasse to University Square. There, in a dark corner, you will encounter a poignant relief depicting the Madonna with the infant Jesus.