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Parks and Gardens in Dublin

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Ireland
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Phoenix Park
The Phoenix Park is the largest enclosed public park in any capital city in Europe. It was originally formed as a royal hunting Park in the 1660s and opened to the public in 1747. A large herd of fallow deer still remain to this day. The Park is also home to the Zoological Gardens, Áras an Uachtaráin, and Victorian flower gardens The Phoenix Park is only a mile and a half from O’Connell Street. Both passive and active recreational pursuits may be viewed or pursued such as walking, running, polo, cricket, hurling, and many more. The Glen Pond is set in very scenic surrounds in the Furry Glen. There are many walks and cycle trails available to the public.
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St Stephen's Green Park
St Stephen’s Green Park is a historical park and garden, located in the centre of Dublin city. Cared for by the Office of Public Works, the park is an important public resource in the area, and provides an oasis of green calm in the middle of a bustling city. Its four centuries of history are eventful and complex, involving such important figures as Arthur Guinness, 1st Baron Ardilaun, and Countess Constance Markievicz. The park itself hosts a large number of important sculptural monuments to Irish history. Many species of birds and plants also call the park their home. Public facilities at St Stephen’s Green Park include a playground and a garden for the visually impaired.
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Dublin Castle
Erected in the early thirteenth century on the site of a Viking settlement, Dublin Castle served for centuries as the headquarters of English, and later British, administration in Ireland. In 1922, following Ireland’s independence, Dublin Castle was handed over to the new Irish government.
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Gypsy Wood Park
Everyone in the family will love a day out at Gypsy Wood Park! We are one of North Wales’ top family attractions, and with a huge range of attractions and things to do for all the family, you’ll be sure of a fun-filled family day out. Come and meet our friendly animals, take a ride on Woody’s Train, try your hand at one of our family games, run wild in our outdoor play areas, make some music in our treehouse and see if you can spot all of our fairies on the fairy hunt and lots more, all set in 20 acres of beautiful natural Welsh woodland. And don’t forget to pack your wellies for the woodland walk and write up your wishes for the Fairy Princess. So why not come and make happy holiday memories with us here at Gypsy Wood Park?
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Sir Thomas and Lady Dixon Park
Sir Thomas and Lady Dixon Park in south Belfast is one of the city's most popular parks. The park is home to the City of Belfast International Rose Garden, which attracts thousands of visitors to Rose Week celebrations which take place in July each year. Covering more than 128 acres, the park is made up of rolling meadows, copses, woodland and gardens and is home to a wide range of plants and animals. An ideal base for exploring nearby Lagan Valley Regional Park, it contains international camellia trials, a walled garden, a Japanese-style garden with water features for quiet contemplation, children's playground and orienteering and eco trails. There is also a bottle bank, barbecue area, picnic tables and full car parking facilities.
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Belfast Botanic Gardens
Botanic Gardens is an important part of Belfast's Victorian heritage and a popular meeting place for residents, students and tourists. Botanic Gardens was established in 1828 by the Belfast Botanic and Horticultural Society, in response to the public interest in horticulture and botany. Originally known as the Belfast Botanic Garden, the site contained exotic tree species and impressive plant collections from the southern hemisphere, many of which can still be seen in the park. Today, the park is popular with residents, students and visitors and is an important venue for concerts, festivals and other events. It is home to the Palm House and the Tropical Ravine.
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Mount Stewart House
Mount Stewart, located on the shores of Strangford Lough in County Down, is Northern Ireland’s much-loved family home. Following a three year £8 million restoration programme, this 19th- century house has been significantly transformed, making it a must-see attraction on the island of Ireland. Voted as one of the top ten gardens in the world, Mount Stewart reflects a rich tapestry of design and planting artistry bearing the hallmark of its creator. Edith, Lady Londonderry’s passion for bold planting schemes coupled with the mild climate of Strangford Lough allows rare and tender plants from across the globe to thrive in this celebrated garden. Each of the formal gardens exudes a distinct character and appeal. Mount Stewart is a delight for the senses with a series of formal themed garden compartments around the house including The Italian, Spanish, Mairi and Shamrock Garden.
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Belfast Zoo
Belfast Zoological Gardens is home to more than 140 species of animal, many of which are in danger in their natural habitat. As one of the oldest visitor attractions in Northern Ireland, many visitors have fond memories of visiting the gardens, which have been home to the animals since 1934. Belfast Zoo is now a leading and award-winning visitor attraction in Northern Ireland, with more than 200,000 visitors each year. Popular attractions include the Asian elephants, Barbary lions, Rothschild's giraffes, California sea lions, penguins, apes, Malayan tapirs, giant anteater, Malayan sun bears, Visayan warty pigs, Goodfellow's tree kangaroo, red-backed bearded sakis, crowned sifaka, ring-tailed lemurs and reptiles.
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Bangor Castle
This impressive building was built for the Hon Robert Edward Ward and his family in 1852. The building is situated in the grounds of Castle Park alongside the North Down Museum and is just a short walk from Bangor Castle Walled Garden.
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Antrim Castle Gardens and Clotworthy House
The gardens are a complex living museum containing over four centuries of culture and heritage. Within the heart of the 60 acre gardens is a unique visitor experience, Clotworthy House.
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The Pembrokeshire Coast National Park
The Pembrokeshire coast is wild, gorgeous and beautifully looked after. For family activity holidays, it’s a nature lab one minute and an adventure playground the next. It’s heaven for wildlife-watching, watersports and walking, and lovely for romantic escapes, too. When you’re ready to chill out after all that fresh air, there are cosy pubs, spa treatments and fabulous sunsets to enjoy.
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Blackpool Stanley Park
The 390-acre Stanley Park is a landmark in its own right, with a magical blend of architecture, horticulture and recreation. Stanley Park abounds in wildlife and its features appeal to the naturalist, the plant lover or one who would do nothing more than relax in elegant surroundings. Delightful horticultural displays can be found throughout the park. Don’t miss the Italian gardens, water fountains, statues, rose gardens and Remembrance Garden. Admire the impressive Cocker Tower - a memorial to Blackpool’s first Mayor Dr William Cocker, the bandstand and ornamental bridges over the lake. Stanley Park has a long sporting history and offers the best facilities in resort from a game of pitch and putt to a round of golf, a trim trail, athletic arena and a sports club for all keep-fit enthusiasts, plus play facilities for the children.
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Blackpool Model Village & Gardens
Blackpool's award-winning attraction the Blackpool Model Village & Gardens, established in 1972, has been inspiring the imaginations of families for decades. There are 100's of creative village scenes that will spark your imagination to life as you wander around their beautiful gardens, along the walkways. Follow the quiz and don't miss any of them. Marvel at the many handcrafted models and figures that represent life's rich tapestry and step back in time to those bygone days when life seemed to move at a slower pace, from a Scottish Castle, protected by its ranks of Guardsmen to a tranquil Cornish fishing village. From thatched cottages hidden away and a Tudor village whos, diminutive residents enjoy a cricket match on the village green. Many new buildings are added yearly along with a working train running through the shopping centre of the main village another in front of the shambles′ and a model railway featuring Thomas Annie & Clarabel!
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Marton Mere Local Nature Reserve
Marton Mere Local Nature Reserve, home to hundreds of species of wildlife, is nationally recognised as a Site of Special Scientific Interest, not bad considering it was once a part of the town’s rubbish tip!
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Chester Zoo
Chester Zoo is home to over 21,000 endangered and exotic animals based in beautiful, award-winning gardens and is the nearest large zoo to Manchester. With over 500 different animal species in their 125 acres, visitors are sure to have an adventure discovering and learning about the amazing wildlife. Conservation and education are at the heart of everything at Chester Zoo. They are committed to providing the highest standards of care for their animals, as well as protecting native and international wildlife. Their team of expert and knowledgeable staff work hard to prevent extinction and are passionate about connecting visitors to the natural world. Chester Zoo has a variety of tours and hands-on experiences, as well as daily animal talks to guarantee a day full of animal adventure. Stop for a snack at one of their many restaurants - including their recently refurbished contemporary British pub The Oakfield - cafes and kiosks located throughout the zoo or let the kids run wild in one of the adventure play areas. It's a huge zoo, but there are plenty of options for getting around including the Zoofari Monorail and the Lazy River Boat Trip on Islands. Don’t forget to stop in at the gift shop on your way out for a souvenir of your trip.
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Knowsley Safari
Have an adventure at Knowsley Safari this summer! Kick off the day with a tour of the 550 acre Safari Drive and get acquainted with over 700 wild animals, from baboons to camels, wildebeest to lions, all from the comfort of your car.
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Whiteford Bay Leisure Park
Whiteford is a quiet, family orientated leisure park with a large children’s adventure playground, site shop and a laundrette. There is no ‘club-house’ or bar on the premises in keeping with the charm and grace of the area
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Penllergare Valley Woods
Penllergare Valley Woods is a picturesque landscape hidden away in a steep valley just a stone's throw, yet a world away, from the M4 in north Swansea. With its lakes and waterfalls, terraces, panoramic views, and exotic trees and shrubs, this forgotten Victorian paradise is being slowly restored and brought back to life by The Penllergare Trust. The car park and visitor centre are located just off J47 of the M4. Visitors can enjoy a drink at our Woodland Coffee Shop, with views from the terrace over our Woodland Garden and towards the Upper Lake. From here, visitors can enjoy over 12km of walks, including a stroll along the old Carriage Drive, and also down into the Llan valley where the Dillwyn Llewlyn family, who lived on the estate in the 19th century, created the Upper Lake and the stunning man-made waterfall. Paths and tracks lead on down alongside the afon Llan as it meanders its way to Fforestfach.
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The Quarry
The Quarry is Shrewsbury's beautiful, 29-acre parkland, encircled by the majestic loop of the River Severn. The Quarry has been Shrewsbury's most important site for recreation since the 16th Century. It still provides the perfect place to relax, enjoy walks, picnic, fish along the banks of the River Severn, or just let off steam. At the heart of the Quarry lies the Dingle, a floral masterpiece cultivated by world-renowned gardener Percy Thrower, who served as Parks Superintendent for 28 years. It's a delightful sunken garden landscaped with alpine borders, brilliant bedding plants, shrubbery and charming water features. For two days each August The Quarry comes alive with more than 3 million blooms, as the park hosts Shrewsbury Flower Show. There is also show jumping, arena entertainment and top military bands, as well as a spectacular firework display.
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Swansea Botanical Gardens
There is something to see throughout the year in the Botanical Gardens. The herbaceous borders are a fantastic sight from late March until mid-October and the variety of glasshouses offer shelter in inclement weather. So even during the harsh winter months, the garden has lots to offer. In 1919 the private estate of the wealthy Vivian family was bought by the Swansea Corporation for use as a public park. In 1926 the Educational Gardens were officially opened as a “collection of economic plants and British flora”. Renamed in 1991 as the Botanical Gardens they contain a renowned double herbaceous border and many mature trees of national importance. In addition, there are fine specimens of rare and exotic plants from around the world as well as a rock garden, herb garden, and the new wildflower garden which opened in 2017. The 40 metre double herbaceous borders were part of the original Educational Gardens created in the 1920’s and their layout is little changed since those times. It is entirely possible that some of the plants found here are divisions of those originally planted. The large aluminium glasshouses were constructed in the early 1990s on the site of the original wooden Tropical and Show glasshouses which had become unsafe. They include a Cactus House with succulents from the desert regions, a Temperate House with plants from Mediterranean-like areas of the world, an Economic House containing plants from around world with various economic uses, and finally a Tropical House with plants from the jungles and rainforests of the world, planted to give a naturalistic setting and kept warm at temperatures above 12° C.
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Clyne Gardens
The Gardens at Clyne were established by Admiral Algernon Walker-Heneage-Vivian who owned Clyne from 1921 until his death in 1952. He sponsored plant collecting expeditions overseas, and many of Clynes rhododendrons still bear their original collector's numbers. The Admiral's influence can also be seen in the landscaping, which includes a Japanese Bridge, the Admirals Tower and the Gazebo.
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Plantasia
Plantasia is now open. Grow Your Imagination. Your adventure starts here! Go on an amazing adventure through a tropical rainforest. Get up close & personal with the animals and discover a variety of rare and exotic plants. Grow your imaginations in this interactive, fully immersive tropical indoor experience for all the family. Discover the different levels of a rainforest; from the dark undergrowth to the breath-taking canopy, there’s so much to squeeze in!
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Dunham Massey Hall
A house filled with treasures and stories, an ancient deer park and a garden for all seasons. Dunham's Lost Years: a Victorian Tale of Love and Abandonment. See the House transformed to revisit its Victorian past. Meet the 7th Earl and his new wife, skilled circus performer Catharine Cox. See their story of love, status and scandal played out throughout the House and discover how they altered the course of Dunham's history forever. The plantsman's garden, one of the finest in the North West, is a tranquil oasis with something to delight in all seasons. The herd of fallow deer wander amongst the tree-lined avenues in the ancient Deer Park. The Park is also home to the fully restored 400-year-old working sawmill powered by overshot water.
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Fletcher Moss Park
This 21-acre park was acquired as a gift from Alderman Fletcher Moss in 1914. Renowned for their botanical beauty, the gardens contain many antiquated and unusual plants and flowers. The park has retained many of its original features such as the rock and heather gardens, and there is an Alpine house in the gardens adjacent to Fletcher Moss. Together they form a picturesque, tranquil haven for visitors. The park also provides an excellent setting for the annual summer Park Play Performance.
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Rochdale Memorial Gardens
The Memorial Gardens were commissioned in 1948 as Gardens of Remembrance which incorporate the impressive Cenotaph designed by architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, designer of the Cenotaph in London. The gardens provide an oasis of calm in the midst of a busy urban landscape. Facilities include memorial benches, a play area and sensory gardens.
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Loch Gruinart
Loch Gruinart is perhaps one of the most beautiful parts of Islay offering stunning views combined with unique wildlife, rare birds and thousands of geese in the wintertime. From the parking close to the bird hide a track takes the visitor through some sheltered woodland offering nice views over the loch, good birding opportunities and viewing platform. RSPB Loch Gruinart Nature Reserve lies to the north-west of Islay and covers some 1600ha. It is a special kind of nature reserve because it includes a working farm - in fact, the biggest in-hand farming operation on a nature reserve anywhere in the UK, and possibly in Europe. There is something to see year-round at the reserve. Some say the most spectacular time to visit is in October when internationally important numbers of barnacle and white-fronted geese return from Greenland for the winter. At the same time, brent geese and whooper swans fly in from Iceland and stop for a day or two's rest before heading onwards to Ireland. This is also a good time to see birds of prey - hen harriers, sparrow-hawks, merlin, peregrine and golden eagles. Redwings strip bare the berries on the rowan trees, flocks of small birds feed in the autumn stubbles, and choughs pull apart cowpats for dung-beetle larvae.
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Kirklinton Hall & Gardens
Take a 17th Century ruin, add 14 acres of gardens and grounds, blend with a sense of history, mix in a large dollop of irreverence; add a generous pinch of fairy dust, and stir. That is the recipe for Kirklinton Hall & Gardens. Also in this stunning garden is an orchard, nuttery, quince grove, bog garden, duck pond and palace, pigs, a yurt, a gypsy caravan and a campsite. A scented rose maze and rose terraces surround the Great Hall. We also have a children's garden with sandpit, playhouse and a Kids Sunflower Bed.
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Dyffryn Gardens
Considered by Cadw to be the best Edwardian gardens in Wales, the National Trust’s Dyffryn Gardens comprises of intimate garden rooms, formal lawns and a glasshouse showcasing impressive cacti and orchid collection. Standing at the heart of the estate is the magnificent Dyffryn House, where everyone can play the pianos, enjoy a game of billiards or sit down and admire the breath-taking views. The property has been a popular filming location for Casualty and Dr Who and was featured in the BBC’s 2017 production of ‘Decline and Fall’ starring Eva Longoria and Jack Whitehall. Dyffryn’s arboretum on the east side of the garden is a wild and exotic area, holding one of the most significant collections of trees in the National Trust. Covering 22 acres, there is plenty to discover, with all year round colour and 17 Champion Trees, the largest of their kind in the British Isles.
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Bute Park
Bute Park & Arboretum is an extensive area of mature parkland easily accessible from the city centre. Flanked by the River Taff, Sophia Gardens, Pontcanna Fields and Cardiff Castle
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Birmingham Botanical Gardens
The gardens cover 15 acres. The Tropical House has a lily pool and lush tropical vegetation. Palms, tree ferns and orchids are displayed in the Sub-tropical House. Outside there is colourful bedding on the Terrace and a tour of the Gardens includes: Rhododendron walks, Rose Garden, Rock Garden, a collection of over 200 trees, Herb and Cottage Gardens, Museum, children's adventure playground, children's discovery garden, aviaries and National Bonsai collection. Sculpture Trail, plant centre, gift shop and refreshment pavilion.
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Cannon Hill Park
There are 5 tennis courts, a bowling green and a mini-golf course all located in the central area between the Midland Arts Centre and the Russell Road car park.
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Strathclyde Country Park
Strathclyde Country Park is an iconic North Lanarkshire Country park which lies in 400 hectares of countryside in the valley of the River Clyde. Set within beautiful surroundings the park is one of the most popular family attractions in the central belt of Scotland, with thousands of visitors coming each year to the park in order to enjoy the vast range of activities and events on offer.
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Glasgow Botanic Gardens
Glasgow Botanic Gardens is located in the heart of the city’s West End by the River Kelvin and contains a variety of plant collections, woodland copses and riverside walks as well as the famous Kibble Palace. Kibble Palace is a magnificent glasshouse designed by John Kibble and houses the national collection of tree ferns. Plants from tropical rainforests grow in the palm house.
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Yorkshire Sculpture Park
Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) is the leading international centre for modern and contemporary sculpture. It is an independent charitable trust and registered museum situated in the 500-acre, 18th-century Bretton Hall estate in West Yorkshire. Founded in 1977 by Executive Director Peter Murray, YSP was the first sculpture park in the UK, and is the largest of its kind in Europe, providing the only place in the world to see Barbara Hepworth’s The Family of Man in its entirety alongside a significant collection of sculpture, including bronzes by Henry Moore, and site-specific works by Andy Goldsworthy, David Nash and James Turrell.
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Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens
These 10 acre walled gardens (listed Grade II) are a rare example of formal English garden design. They are being restored as near as possible to the period 1680 to 1762 when the Bridgeman family moved to Weston Park. The house was built in 1599 by Sir Edward Devereux and extended by Sir John Bridgeman I about 100 years later. The Gardens were developed by several generations of the Bridgeman Family (later to become the Earls of Bradford) reaching peaks of excellence around 1760 and 1900. The Gardens fell into decline during the middle part of the twentieth century until they were rescued by the Trust in 1985. The Holly Maze is a distorted mirror image of the one at Hampton Court Palace designed by George London and Henry Wise.