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Palaces in Naples

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Castel dell'Ovo
The Castel dell’Ovo is the oldest standing fortification in Naples. The castle’s name comes from a legend about the Roman poet Virgil, who had a reputation in medieval times as a great sorcerer and predictor of the future. As early as the twelfth century there were pre-norman fortifications erected on the remains of part of the villa of the Roman general Lucio Vicinio Lucullo, later transformed into a castle by Frederick II and expanded in the Angevin period, when the fortress took the name "Egg Castle"
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Capodimonte Royal Palace And Museum
In 1738 Charles of Bourbon decided to transform his hunting lodge located in the wood of “Capodimonte” in a Royal Palace – Museum in order to host the Farnese Collection received from his mother.
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Palazzo dei Papi
The Pope's residence was established in the bishop's palace which, for the occasion, it was enlarged and adapted to the magnificence and solemnity required for a papal seat.
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Palace Biankini
In the 19th century during the period of sailboats Stari Grad marked the development of the shipping industry and naval construction. There is a rich naval collection preserved in Palace Biankini in Stari Grad. The collection was founded by the Centre for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage of the island of Hvar in 1966 and besides documentation on naval construction; it also displays various nautical instruments, paintings of Hvar captains, old nautical charts and literature on navigation.
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Korcula Town Museum
Korcula Town Museum (Gradski muzej Korcula) is located at St Mark’s Square facing Cathedral Sveti Marko. The Museum is housed in Gabrielis palace that was built in 15th and 16th century. It is 3 storey building with basement and attic. Museum has various collections covering Korcula’s history and culture from Ancient history to nowadays.
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Bishop's Treasury Museum
Bishop’s Treasury Museum is located in Bishops Palace in an elegant two-storey palace on Sveti Marko Square in Korcula Old Town. The museum is also called Abbey Treasury of St Mark (Opatska Riznica Svetog Marka). The ground floor covers parish office, library, archives and Kitchen exhibition hall. On the first floor, there are exhibits of Treasury hall, while the top floor covers residence of the parish priest. The museum exhibits numerous works of art including some paintings by Blaz Jurjev and Tiepolo. There are also old manuscripts with illuminated codex from the 12th century, alabaster sculptures from the 15th century as well as a statue of Mary Stuart from the 17th century. This is an interesting museum collection worth to visit if you are in Korcula.
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Arneri Palace
Arneri Palace in Korcula extends from the western edge of the Old Town to Trg Svetog Marka – the main Old Town square (also, known as Pjaca). Built in Venetian Gothic architecture by Arneri family, this elegantly ornamented palace dates from late sixteenth / early seventeenth century. Beside the artistically valuable courtyard (see above photos) the windows and the walls of the palace in the south street are decorated by intricate building and sculpting details. The palace, being among the most beautiful buildings in the town is a well-known town landmark.
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Diocletian Palace
Diocletian Palace is one of the best preserved monuments of the Roman architecture in the world. The Emperor's Palace was built as a combination of a luxury villa - summer house and a Roman military camp (castrum), divided into four parts with two main streets.
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Rectors Palace
Historical sources mention Rector´s Palace in Zadar as soon as the 13th century. From that time until today the edifice has gone through many changes including the last reconstruction and the opening on February 10th 2017.
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Rector's Palace
The Rector’s Palace (Croatian: Knežev dvor) is a palace in the city of Dubrovnik that used to serve as the seat of the Rector of the Republic of Ragusa between the 14th century and 1808. It was also the seat of the Minor Council and the state administration. Furthermore, it housed an armoury, the powder magazine, the watch house and a prison. The rector’s palace was built in the Gothic style, but it also has Renaissance and Baroque elements, harmoniously combining these elements. Originally it was a site of a defence building in the early Middle Ages. It was destroyed by a fire in 1435 and the town decided to build a new palace. The job was offered to the master-builder Onofrio della Cava of Naples, who had previously built the aqueduct. It became a Gothic building with ornaments sculpted by Pietro di Martino of Milan. A gunpowder explosion badly damaged the building in 1463. The renewal was offered to the architect Michelozzo of Florence. But he was rejected in 1464 because his plans went too much in the style of the Renaissance. Other builders continued the work. The capitals of the porch were reshaped in Renaissance style probably by Salvi di Michele of Florence. He continued the reconstruction from 1467 on. The building suffered damages from the earthquake of 1520 and again in 1667. Reconstruction was in Baroque style. A flight of stairs and a bell were added in the atrium. In 1638 the Senate erected a monument to Miho Pracat (by Pietro Giacometti of Recanati), a rich shipowner from Lopud, who had bequeathed his wealth to Dubrovnik.
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Sponza Palace
The Sponza Palace (Croatian: Palača Sponza), also called Divona (from dogana, customs), is a 16th­century palace in Dubrovnik, Croatia. Its name is derived from the Latin word “spongia”, the spot where rainwater was collected. The rectangular building with an inner courtyard was built in a mixed Gothic and Renaissance style between 1516 and 1522 by Paskoje Miličević Mihov. The loggia and sculptures were crafted by the brothers Andrijić and other stonecutters. The palace has served a variety of public functions, including as a customs office and bonded warehouse, mint, armoury, treasury, bank and school. It became the cultural center of the Republic of Ragusa with the establishment of the Academia dei Concordi, a literary academy, in the 16th century. It survived the 1667 earthquake without damage. The palace’s atrium served as a trading center and business meeting place. An inscription on an arch testifies to this public function:
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Palazzo Pitti and the Boboli Gardens
This enormous palace is one of Florence's largest architectural monuments. The original palazzo was built for the Pitti family in 1457, designed by Filippo Brunelleschi and built by his pupil Luca Fancelli. The original construction consisted of only the middle cube of the present building. In 1549, the property was sold to the Medicis and became the primary residence of the grand ducal family. The palace was then enlarged and altered; from 1560, Bartolomeo Ammannati designed and added the grandiose courtyard and two lateral wings. Today, the Pitti Palace houses some of the most important museums in Florence: on the first floor is the Palatine Gallery, containing a broad collection 16th and 17th century paintings (including works by Raphael), and the Royal Apartments, containing furnishings from a remodeling done in the 19th century. On the ground floor and mezzanine is the Treasury of the Grand Dukes (formerly known as the the Silver Museum or Museo degli Argenti) displaying a vast collection of Medici household treasures, from table silverware to precious stone vases, rock crystals and precious jewelry. The Gallery of Modern Art is on the top floor, holding a collection of mostly Tuscan 19th and 20th century paintings.
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La Rive Droite
Dedicated to the so-called "right bank", that is, the area of the historic centre that unfolds to the right of the cathedral of San Lorenzo, this itinerary begins in Piazza Caricamento, where goods were once unloaded and loaded in the old harbour. Here, you'll find Palazzo San Giorgio, today home to the Port Authority.
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Maritime and History Museum of the Croatian Coast
The museum is headquartered in the former Governor's Palace, a historicist edifice and protected cultural monument. The Governor's Palace was constructed in 1896 and designed by Alajos Hauszmann, one of the foremost Hungarian architects during the time when Rijeka was under Hungarian rule. Today, the palace houses the Maritime and History Museum of the Croatian Littoral, which was established in 1961 and comprises maritime, historical and cultural, ethnographic and archaeological departments. Some of the original items from the Governor's Palace, such as furniture and artisan craft-work, have been preserved and exhibited in salons on the first floor. The permanent exhibition of the museum provides an interactive and modern platform for showcasing the long, rich and tumultuous history and culture of living in the area of what is today Primorje-Gorski Kotar County from prehistoric times to the present day. The Lipa Pamti Memorial Centre (Lipa Remembers), which is dedicated to the victims of the Lipa massacre that took place on 30 April 1944, is also a part of the museum. In addition to its memorial heritage, the Memorial Centre interprets the entire cultural, historical and ethnographical heritage of the Liburnian Karst region (Rupa, Pasjak, Šapjane and Brce) from prehistoric times to the present day.
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The Dogi Palace
The Dogi Palace represent the symbol and the hart of the political and administrative life of the Venetian Republic millenary history. In the halls of the palace the Doge and the council took all the decision about Venice and its life.
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Pilotta palace
The vast but unfinished complex, named after the game pelota that was played in one of the courtyards, was built in the second half of the 16th century at the order of Ranuccio I around the Visconti stronghold and alongside the existing church of San Pietro martire.
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Cathedral of Zagreb
Zagreb Cathedral was formerly known as St. Stephen’s Cathedral. Today, the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary is dedicated to the Assumption of Mary and to kings Saint Stephen and Saint Ladislaus. Once you get to Kaptol Square you will see it is dominated by Zagreb cathedral which has been there since the 11th century. The Archbishop’s Palace encloses it from three sides, and because of its twin 108 meters (354 ft) high spires, it is the tallest building in Croatia. It literally soars over the city. The Zagreb Cathedral must be seen and its sacristy is of great architectural value. What you will see today does not represent the original construction. The first Cathedral was damaged during the Tartar attack and a great fire in the 13th century. Finally, it was severely damaged by the 1880 earthquake and was restored in the Neo-Gothic style by Hermann Bollé, the cathedral you see today.
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Villa Serego - Alighieri
The oldest part of the villa dates back to 1353, the year in which Pietro, son of the poet Dante Alighieri, established himself in Gargagnago.
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Prince's Palace of Monaco
The Prince's Palace is the private residence of the ruling Prince but the State Apartments are open for public visits part of the year. The original fortress and ramparts were built by the Genoese in 1215 and throughout the centuries was transformed into one of the most luxurious residences in the style of Louis XIV. Prince Honore II was responsible for re-assembling the rich collections of art, which had been auctioned off during the French Revolution when the Palace was turned into a hospital for the Italian Army. However, Prince Rainier III is credited for restoring the Palace to its former glory and the magnificent state in which it can be seen today. Beginning at the top of the Hercule Gallery and descending on to the main courtyard is a spectacular double-revolution Carrera marble staircase dating from the 13th century and inspired by a similar staircase at the Chateau of Fontainebleau. Adorning the gallery walls are frescoes of mythological figures attributed to Francesco Mazzucchelli dating from the 16th century and the Genovese artist Orazio Ferrari in the 17th century. The frescoes in the Palatine chapel in the north end of the main courtyard depict the history of Saint Devote, the patron Saint of the Principality. The chapel, built-in 1665, is dedicated to Saint John the Baptist.
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Villa Olmo
This villa is a great example of neoclassical architecture. Its construction started at the end of 18th century and was finished in 1812 by marquesses Odescalchi. It belonged to family Raimondi and Visconti di Modrone.
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Eggenberg Palace
The universe is in Graz! It’s no joke, but rather a wonderful example of harmonious architectural skill: Eggenberg Palace on the edge of the city centre. Set within a beautiful park is the main palace, which was laid out as an architectural allegory of the universe. The building represents a precisely calculated cosmos. It was commissioned by Prince Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg from the year 1625 to embody his wish for a harmonious structure, reacting to the chaos of the 16th century. 365 windows, 31 rooms on each floor, 24 state rooms with 52 doors and, in all, 60 windows, 4 corner towers - all allusions to time, to the seasons, to weeks, days, hours, minutes. This number symbolism based on the then new Gregorian calendar is the architectural programme of the palace. Also the paintings in the Planetensaal (Planet Hall), whose decoration was started in 1678, are characterized by astronomical symbolism.
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Palazzo Estense and Gardens
One of the public buildings in Varese that is well worth a visit is Palazzo Estense, which was the summer and autumn residence and court of Francesco III d'Este, the Duke of Modena and Lord of Varese. It was built to the designs of the architect Bianchi in the second half of the eighteenth century. The “Salone Estense” (Estense Hall) with its large fireplace made from multicoloured marble is quite stunning. Palazzo Estense is now the Town Hall. Behind the palace are the Estensi Gardens, one of the most charming public parks in Italy, which were built in the same style as the gardens of the Schönbrunn Palace, in Vienna, and finished in 1787.
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Royal Palace
In 1563, with the transfer of the ducat's capital from Chambéry to Turin, Emanuele Filiberto of Savoy established his residence in the palace of the bishop at the Duomo; already in 1584, Carlo Emanuele I entrusted the architect Ascanio Vittozzi with the construction of a new factory. After 1643, with the regency of Maria Cristina of France, the direction of the work passed to Carlo di Castellamonte and then to Carlo Morello.
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Imperial Palace
The Imperial Palace was completed in the year 1500 under Emperor Maximilian I (1459-1519). The palace was built to the same scale as is seen today and was captured as a watercolour by Albrecht Dürer. he painting shows a late Gothic courtyard with covered staircase, a Crest Tower and the women’s quarters (or “women’s rooms”). The reception area, which is known today as the “Gothic Cellar”, was built in the style of a large hall with columns and vaults. A “Kürnstube” (home to Maximilian’s hunting trophies), the “Silver chamber” (treasury) and the Festival Hall (with depictions of Hercules) are also reminders of the time. The “Rennplatz” square in front of the Imperial Palace served as a competition arena to please the sports-loving Emperor. Almost 250 years later, Maria Theresa (1717-1780) visited the Innsbruck palace and deemed it to be behind the times. There hadn’t been any Tyrolean princes since 1665 and the governor, who reigned Tyrol on behalf of the Emperor, lived in the governor’s quarters on the first floor. The representation rooms on the second floor, which were reserved for the Imperial family, were uninhabited. Maria Theresa arranged for the palace to be rebuilt in the Viennese late Baroque style and sent her best artists to Innsbruck: Konstantin von Walter and Nicolaus Parcassi. Martin van Meytens and his school and Franz Anton Maulbertsch were appointed for the interior. The renovations were interrupted by the Seven Years’ War and, therefore, only completed in the 1770s.
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Hellbrunn Palace & Trick Fountains
For more than 400 years, Hellbrunn Palace has enchanted and amazed its visitors with its trick fountains. A unique experience with all kinds of surprises in store! The idyllic location in the south of Salzburg was ideal in many regards: Hellbrunn Mountain is a naturally abundant source of water, which inevitably became a central design feature of the palace grounds. The centerpiece is provided by Mannerist trick fountains that are absolutely unique. From a mechanical theater to water-spewing stags, to a crown dancing atop a spout of water - the many-and-varied hydraulic attractions never fail to captivate visitors with their originality and astonishing effects. The spacious parks and gardens of Hellbrunn Palace are partially landscaped, partially natural biotope. They are a marvelous place to unwind, take a walk and enjoy a bit of outdoor sport. Children will immediately be drawn to the big adventure playground. And in winter, too, Hellbrunn is always well worth a visit: During the run-up to Christmas, the palace courtyard and the old driveway are transformed into a festive Advent market.
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Mirabell Palace and Gardens
Mirabell Palace was built in 1606 by prince-archbishop Wolf Dietrich for his beloved Salome Alt. Today, it serves as the backdrop for the most romantic weddings you could possibly imagine. Mirabell Palace looks back on a colorful history. Today, Mirabell Palace is home to municipal offices as well as those of the mayor of Salzburg. Mirabell Gardens – Baroque pleasure gardens in the heart of the city. They were completely redesigned under archbishop Johann Ernst von Thun in 1690. The underlying geometric form, which is typical for the Baroque, is still clearly recognizable. The visual orientation towards the cathedral and fortress adds to the grandeur of the gardens – simultaneously incorporating them into the overall historical ensemble of the city. Mirabell Gardens, along with the Felsenreitschule and Nonnberg Convent, is one of the most important shooting locations from the famous Hollywood musical “The Sound of Music”. In the film, Maria and the children dance around the Pegasus Fountain in front of the palace, singing the song “Do Re Mi”. At the end of the scene, the Trapp family stand on the steps in front of the Rose Hill and sing the song’s final bars. At the same time, viewers are enchanted by unique views across Mirabell Gardens towards the fortress.
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The Old Major
Several buildings have stood on these foundations since the 5th century but the current Roman Provencal style church built in pink stone from the Couronne quarries dates back to the mid-12th century.
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Linderhof Palace
Situated in the midst of the Bavarian Alpine foothills, Schloss Linderhof (Linderhof Palace) attracts visitors to the imperial villa with its spacious landscaped garden and impressive terraces.
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Esterhazy Palace
Esterházy Palace in Eisenstadt is one of the most beautiful baroque castles in Austria and gives an impressive insight into the former glittering life at the court of the Princes Esterházy. With the authentic ambience and the excellent acoustics of the Haydn Hall, Esterházy Palace is still the center of cultural events: here concerts are given, festivals celebrated and glamorous exhibitions shown. An exciting counterpoint is the former stables opposite the castle. Together they form the Schlossquartier Eisenstadt, where contemporary and historical, music and art, culinary and wine meet each other in a unique way.
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Bishops Castle and Episcopal Palace
The traces of Roman building activities have been found in the foundation of the castle. Its oldest parts are the lower section of the tower castle, the so-called runaway corridor dating from the XIV. century, as well as the adjacent cross-vaulted hall.
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Renaissance Palast Hohenems
Building commenced in 1563. The palace used to be the residence of the Counts of Ems (their marriage policy lead to them being related to the Medici) and, along with Glopper castle and Alt-Ems castle ruins, is still privately owned. Of special mention regarding the history of the palace is the discovery of manuscripts A and C of the Niebelungenlied (the song of the Nibelungs).
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Neumann Palace
The Neumann Palace (Palatul Neumann) is a two-story, 19th century, eclectic architectural style palace that’s located in the city center of Arad, Romania. The palace was founded by and built to be, the living quarters for the Jewish, Neumann family, which emigrated to Arad from Vienna in the mid-19th century. The Neumann family went on to become one of the most influential, wealthy, and aristocratic families in all of Romania at the end of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century. The Neumann’s amassed great fortunes by owning many factories, stadiums, schools, and by controlling the majority of industry in Arad at the time. Some of the family’s most profitable businesses were their spirit and yeast factories, their textile factories, and their steam-powered flour mills. The Neumann family played a significant role in the early development of Arad. Their factories employed and provided salaries to thousands of Arad citizens. The family built schools and stadiums for the community. They also helped fund projects that modernized much of the city’s infrastructure.
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Arad Culture Palace
The Cultural Palace (Palatul Cultural) is an early 20th century diverse (multi) architectural style palace located in the city of Arad, Romania. The architecture of the building contains the Classic Italian Renaissance, Romanian Baroque, and French Gothic, elements and designs. The inspiration for some of the palace’s design came from the 15th century Corvin Castle, of Hunedoara, Romania. The idea for the Cultural Palace came from the Kölcsey Cultural Association (Society) of Arad. The Kölcsey Cultural Association of Arad was a literary, historical association that operated in Arad from 1881-1948, and again in 1989. The association was formed by and consisted of a committee of Hungarian’s that were living in Arad. They are credited for preserving much of Arad’s culture and history.