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Palaces in Bratislava

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Slovakia
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Primatial Palace
The Primate’s Palace is one of the most beautiful classicist buildings in Slovakia. Portraits of Hungarian rulers are exhibited in the picture gallery. An impressive part of the gallery is a collection of six tapestries found in the reconstruction of the palace.
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Grassalkovich Palace
This rococo summer palace was built in 1760 for the chairman of the Hungarian Royal Chamber and advisor to Empress Maria Theresa, Count Anton Grassalkovich. The sumptuous house was a sought-after venue for aristocratic society events. The palace is now the official residence of the President of the Slovak Republic.
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Esterhazy Palace
Esterházy Palace in Eisenstadt is one of the most beautiful baroque castles in Austria and gives an impressive insight into the former glittering life at the court of the Princes Esterházy. With the authentic ambience and the excellent acoustics of the Haydn Hall, Esterházy Palace is still the center of cultural events: here concerts are given, festivals celebrated and glamorous exhibitions shown. An exciting counterpoint is the former stables opposite the castle. Together they form the Schlossquartier Eisenstadt, where contemporary and historical, music and art, culinary and wine meet each other in a unique way.
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Hofburg Imperial Palace
Vienna's Imperial Palace is one of the biggest palace complexes in the world. The oldest parts date to the 13th century, with construction having continued right into the 20th century. The Imperial Palace was the residence and seat of government of the Habsburg emperors until 1918. Today, it is home to numerous museums with outstanding collections, the Spanish Riding School, a congress center, the seat of the Austrian Federal President as well as the historic Heldenplatz.
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Schoenbrunn Palace
The former summer residence of the Habsburgs impresses with imperial ceremonial rooms and magnificent gardens. Maria Theresa, Emperor Franz Joseph, Empress Elisabeth and others once resided here. Schönbrunn Palace is one of Europe's most beautiful Baroque complexes and has been in the possession of the Habsburgs since 1569. The wife of Emperor Ferdinand II, Eleonore von Gonzaga, had a pleasure palace built on the site in 1642 and called the property "Schönbrunn" for the first time. The palace and garden complex created from 1696 onwards following the siege of Vienna was complete redesigned under Maria Theresa after 1743. Today, due to its historical significance, its unique layout and magnificent furnishings, the palace is a UNESCO World Heritage site.
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Bishops Castle and Episcopal Palace
The traces of Roman building activities have been found in the foundation of the castle. Its oldest parts are the lower section of the tower castle, the so-called runaway corridor dating from the XIV. century, as well as the adjacent cross-vaulted hall.
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Vienna Ringstrasse
The most beautiful boulevard in the world is home not only to many of Vienna's best-known sights, such as the Imperial Palace, the Kunsthistorisches Museum and the Natural History Museum, the Vienna State Opera and Parliament. Magnificent palaces, extensive parks and important monuments also line the "display window" of the former Danube monarchy. Vienna's Ringstrasse is 5.3 kilometers long. Long enough to provide space for numerous monumental buildings, which were built during the period of Historicism in the 1860s to 1890s. Today, the buildings that stand there – from the Vienna State Opera to the Museum of Fine Arts – are among the most important sights in the city of Vienna. Nobles and rich citizens hurried to build pompous palaces along this magnificent boulevard. Many of these former private homes can still be admired today (mostly, however, only from the outside). The style in which the buildings were built went down in history as the Ringstrasse style (a type of Historicism). It is marked by a pluralism of styles: numerous architectural forms of previous epochs were imitated.
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Buda Castle Hill
The first citizens arrived to Castle Hill in the 13th century after the Mongolian invasion, seeking protection in the hills of Buda. The first royal castle was built around this time. The golden age of Castle Hill was in the 15th century, following the marriage of King Matthias Corvinus and Beatrix of Naples in 1476.
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Buda Castle
Royal Palace – Buda Castle is the historical castle and palace complex of the Hungarian kings in Budapest and was first completed in 1265. The first, Gothic style royal palace was built during the reign of Louis the Great, King Sigismund and King Matthias (from the middle of the 14th century until the end of the 15th). It became a royal residence of European rank, with its Gothic and Renaissance elements. Buda was occupied by the Turks in 1541, and it was only retaken during the Christian siege of Buda in 1686. In WWII, the palace and the Castle District were the last refuges of the Germany Army, which fell under heavy siege from the invading Soviet Army. The palace was again damaged; reconstruction started in the 1950-s. Leading architects of the age have announced that they wanted to return to the 18th-century Baroque form of the palace, and at the same time keep its 19th-century dimensions. They constructed a Baroque façade that never existed before. This was because 20th-century architects saw no value in an eclectic style, although this is now considered to be the most valuable aspect of Budapest’s buildings.
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Eggenberg Palace
The universe is in Graz! It’s no joke, but rather a wonderful example of harmonious architectural skill: Eggenberg Palace on the edge of the city centre. Set within a beautiful park is the main palace, which was laid out as an architectural allegory of the universe. The building represents a precisely calculated cosmos. It was commissioned by Prince Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg from the year 1625 to embody his wish for a harmonious structure, reacting to the chaos of the 16th century. 365 windows, 31 rooms on each floor, 24 state rooms with 52 doors and, in all, 60 windows, 4 corner towers - all allusions to time, to the seasons, to weeks, days, hours, minutes. This number symbolism based on the then new Gregorian calendar is the architectural programme of the palace. Also the paintings in the Planetensaal (Planet Hall), whose decoration was started in 1678, are characterized by astronomical symbolism.
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Cathedral of Zagreb
Zagreb Cathedral was formerly known as St. Stephen’s Cathedral. Today, the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary is dedicated to the Assumption of Mary and to kings Saint Stephen and Saint Ladislaus. Once you get to Kaptol Square you will see it is dominated by Zagreb cathedral which has been there since the 11th century. The Archbishop’s Palace encloses it from three sides, and because of its twin 108 meters (354 ft) high spires, it is the tallest building in Croatia. It literally soars over the city. The Zagreb Cathedral must be seen and its sacristy is of great architectural value. What you will see today does not represent the original construction. The first Cathedral was damaged during the Tartar attack and a great fire in the 13th century. Finally, it was severely damaged by the 1880 earthquake and was restored in the Neo-Gothic style by Hermann Bollé, the cathedral you see today.
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Hellbrunn Palace & Trick Fountains
For more than 400 years, Hellbrunn Palace has enchanted and amazed its visitors with its trick fountains. A unique experience with all kinds of surprises in store! The idyllic location in the south of Salzburg was ideal in many regards: Hellbrunn Mountain is a naturally abundant source of water, which inevitably became a central design feature of the palace grounds. The centerpiece is provided by Mannerist trick fountains that are absolutely unique. From a mechanical theater to water-spewing stags, to a crown dancing atop a spout of water - the many-and-varied hydraulic attractions never fail to captivate visitors with their originality and astonishing effects. The spacious parks and gardens of Hellbrunn Palace are partially landscaped, partially natural biotope. They are a marvelous place to unwind, take a walk and enjoy a bit of outdoor sport. Children will immediately be drawn to the big adventure playground. And in winter, too, Hellbrunn is always well worth a visit: During the run-up to Christmas, the palace courtyard and the old driveway are transformed into a festive Advent market.
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Mirabell Palace and Gardens
Mirabell Palace was built in 1606 by prince-archbishop Wolf Dietrich for his beloved Salome Alt. Today, it serves as the backdrop for the most romantic weddings you could possibly imagine. Mirabell Palace looks back on a colorful history. Today, Mirabell Palace is home to municipal offices as well as those of the mayor of Salzburg. Mirabell Gardens – Baroque pleasure gardens in the heart of the city. They were completely redesigned under archbishop Johann Ernst von Thun in 1690. The underlying geometric form, which is typical for the Baroque, is still clearly recognizable. The visual orientation towards the cathedral and fortress adds to the grandeur of the gardens – simultaneously incorporating them into the overall historical ensemble of the city. Mirabell Gardens, along with the Felsenreitschule and Nonnberg Convent, is one of the most important shooting locations from the famous Hollywood musical “The Sound of Music”. In the film, Maria and the children dance around the Pegasus Fountain in front of the palace, singing the song “Do Re Mi”. At the end of the scene, the Trapp family stand on the steps in front of the Rose Hill and sing the song’s final bars. At the same time, viewers are enchanted by unique views across Mirabell Gardens towards the fortress.
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Wroclaw Royal Palace
From 2009 the palace is the main building of the City Museum of Wrocław and presents, among others the exhibition “1000 years of Wrocław”. The Royal Palace (Pałac Królewski) was called Spaetgen’s Palace, from the name of one of the first owners. In 1717 baron Heinrich G. Spaetgen bought a small baroque mansion close to Rynek. After his death in 1750, a Prussian King Frederick II bought the palace. It became a royal mansion, and Wrocław joined Berlin and Königsberg (today’s Kaliningrad) as a residence city. The next Prussian kings extended the palace, changed its design and character. In the middle of the 19th century the palace extended itself from Wolności Square to Kazimierza Wielkiego Street. After the fall of the empire the palace was taken by the city authorities, in the 20s the Palace Museum was opened. During World War II the building was seriously damaged.
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Financial Palace
The eclectic-style Financial Palace was completed in 1912. Earlier, the plot was occupied by the house of György Komáromi Csipkés, a judge of the city, which hosted the preparatory negotiations of the Treaty of Szatmár in 1711.
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Maritime and History Museum of the Croatian Coast
The museum is headquartered in the former Governor's Palace, a historicist edifice and protected cultural monument. The Governor's Palace was constructed in 1896 and designed by Alajos Hauszmann, one of the foremost Hungarian architects during the time when Rijeka was under Hungarian rule. Today, the palace houses the Maritime and History Museum of the Croatian Littoral, which was established in 1961 and comprises maritime, historical and cultural, ethnographic and archaeological departments. Some of the original items from the Governor's Palace, such as furniture and artisan craft-work, have been preserved and exhibited in salons on the first floor. The permanent exhibition of the museum provides an interactive and modern platform for showcasing the long, rich and tumultuous history and culture of living in the area of what is today Primorje-Gorski Kotar County from prehistoric times to the present day. The Lipa Pamti Memorial Centre (Lipa Remembers), which is dedicated to the victims of the Lipa massacre that took place on 30 April 1944, is also a part of the museum. In addition to its memorial heritage, the Memorial Centre interprets the entire cultural, historical and ethnographical heritage of the Liburnian Karst region (Rupa, Pasjak, Šapjane and Brce) from prehistoric times to the present day.
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Vulturul Negru Palace
THE BLACK EAGLE COMPLEX is probably the most monumental architectural accomplishment in Oradea and in Transylvania, as far as the Secession building style is concerned. The contest to build this architectural complex was won by architects Komor Marcell and Jakab Dezső.
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Thurn and Taxis Palace
This magnificent palace emerged from the buildings of the former Benedictine monastery of St. Emmeram. In connection with the abolition of the postal rights the royal house of Thurn and Taxis purchased the greatest part of the monastery buildings in 1810 and extended them to make them their permanent residence.
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Neumann Palace
The Neumann Palace (Palatul Neumann) is a two-story, 19th century, eclectic architectural style palace that’s located in the city center of Arad, Romania. The palace was founded by and built to be, the living quarters for the Jewish, Neumann family, which emigrated to Arad from Vienna in the mid-19th century. The Neumann family went on to become one of the most influential, wealthy, and aristocratic families in all of Romania at the end of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century. The Neumann’s amassed great fortunes by owning many factories, stadiums, schools, and by controlling the majority of industry in Arad at the time. Some of the family’s most profitable businesses were their spirit and yeast factories, their textile factories, and their steam-powered flour mills. The Neumann family played a significant role in the early development of Arad. Their factories employed and provided salaries to thousands of Arad citizens. The family built schools and stadiums for the community. They also helped fund projects that modernized much of the city’s infrastructure.
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Palace of Cenad Arad
The Cenad Palace (Palatul Cenad) is a three-story, 19th century, eclectic, neo-classical, architectural style palace located in the city of Arad, Romania. The palace was constructed with the sole purpose of functioning as the headquarters for Arad’s Railway Company. Funding for the palace was provided by the very wealthy and aristocratic Count Želenski Robert. The Cenad Palace has an imposing presence in the Arad center. It is surrounded by many other eclectic and neo-classical style buildings which were Arad’s predominant architectural styles in the era of the late 19th century. The palace is considered and listed as one of Romania’s Historical Monuments. The palace is shaped like an L and contains two spectacular towers on the front left and front right corners. There are four separate entrance gates which lead inside the building. The palace’s courtyard contains two dazzling 19th-century gas chandeliers which have been well preserved for many decades.
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The Administrative Palace
The Administrative Palace of Arad is a building built between 1872-1875, which today houses the Arad City Hall. Architectural gem, shaped in "U", with 90 rooms, a true "Palazzo del Municipio", the building reflects the possibilities and also the willingness of citizens to keep up with European modernization.
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Arad Culture Palace
The Cultural Palace (Palatul Cultural) is an early 20th century diverse (multi) architectural style palace located in the city of Arad, Romania. The architecture of the building contains the Classic Italian Renaissance, Romanian Baroque, and French Gothic, elements and designs. The inspiration for some of the palace’s design came from the 15th century Corvin Castle, of Hunedoara, Romania. The idea for the Cultural Palace came from the Kölcsey Cultural Association (Society) of Arad. The Kölcsey Cultural Association of Arad was a literary, historical association that operated in Arad from 1881-1948, and again in 1989. The association was formed by and consisted of a committee of Hungarian’s that were living in Arad. They are credited for preserving much of Arad’s culture and history.
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Dresden Royal Palace
Dresden’s Royal Palace was once the hub of power for the Saxon princes and kings. First mentioned in the 14th century as a castle complex, the four-wing palace structure was developed in the 15th century. After it was destroyed by fire in 1701, the palace was reconstructed under Augustus the Strong. After air attacks during the last few months of the Second World War, the palace – with its approximately 500 halls and rooms – once again burned down to its foundations. Most of the valuable interior furnishings were lost. In 1985, reconstruction began on the palace to create a museum complex for the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (Dresden State Art Collections). The first museum to move into the Royal Palace was the Kupferstich-Kabinett (Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs); it has been displaying its treasures there since April 2004. The New Green Vault was opened in September 2004. Since September 2006, the Historic Green Vault can once again be admired in its original rooms. Today, the exterior of the Royal Palace is decorated in Neorenaissance style, while the large courtyard of the palace displays Renaissance-style sgraffito paintings. The Hausmann Tower overlooks the whole ensemble, offering a wonderful view of the Old Town. Starting in 2010, after five years of construction, the English Stairway in the Dresden Royal Palace is once again accessible. The Baroque stairway was reconstructed at a cost of four million euros, following its original historic pattern. In the future, it will serve as the main entrance for the museums of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen. The Türckische Cammer (Turkish Chamber) was also opened in March 2010, containing countless small treasures that were not open to the public for more than seventy years. The renovation of the Palace is completed since 2013.
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Lustheim Palace
Exemplary pleasure palace with novel (for the time) ceiling frescoes. Maximilian Emanuel's "hunting palace" was built to celebrate his marriage to the Emperor's daughter, Maria Antonia, in June 1685. The palace houses an outstanding collection of Meissen porcelain from the Ernst Schneider Foundation. The collection includes over 2,000 valuable plates, table centerpieces and animal figures, and is surpassed only by the collection in the Dresdner Zwinger Palace.
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Munich Residence
The Munich Residence served as the seat of government and residence of the Bavarian dukes, electors and kings from 1508 to 1918. What began in 1385 as a castle in the north-eastern corner of the city (the Neuveste, or new citadel), was transformed by the rulers over the centuries into a magnificent palace, its buildings and gardens extending further and further into the town. The rooms and art collections spanning a period that begins with the Renaissance, and extends via the early Baroque and Rococo epochs to Neoclassicism, bear witness to the discriminating taste and the political ambition of the Wittelsbach dynasty. Much of the Residence was destroyed during the Second World War, and from 1945 it was gradually reconstructed. Today, with the museums of the Bavarian Palace Administration (the Residence Museum itself, the Treasury and the Cuvilliés Theatre) along with other cultural institutions, this is one of the largest museum complexes in Bavaria.
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The Roman-Catholic Episcopacy Palace
The Roman-Catholic Episcopacy Palace is one of the most representative Baroque buildings in Timişoara.
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Lubomirski Summer Palace
Lubomirski Summer Palace in Rzeszów is one of the most valuable architectural city preserved to our times. Located in close proximity to the Castle of the Lubomirski, over the centuries, it has undergone many reconstructions. He did not keep their original architectural garments, as well as the baroque gardens that stretched around. Despite this, the testimony of a former glory still patronage of the Lubomirski family, then owners latifundium. Currently, the Summer Palace of Lubomirski houses the seat of the Regional Medical Chamber. Some rooms on the second floor are for rent. The basements described earlier were adapted as restaurant and catering facilities.
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Nymphenburg Palace
The baroque palace in the west part of Munich was the summer residence of the Bavarian monarchs. Five generations of Wittelsbach rulers were involved in the construction of this stately ensemble, which houses several outstanding collections. With its lavishly decorated interior and the famous "Gallery of Beauties" commissioned by Ludwig I, the palace is one of Munich's favorite attractions. Among the highlights are the former bedroom of King Ludwig II and the impressive banquet hall with fine ceiling frescoes by Johann Baptist Zimmermann. The Nymphenburg Palace west of Munich is one of the largest royal palaces in Europe and is not to be missed on a sight-seeing tour through the Bavarian capital city. The oft-visited Baroque tourist attraction with it’s expansive landscaped garden and museum draws not only guests from around the world, but is also a beloved institution for Munich residents. In 1664, Prince Ferdinand Maria had the castle built as a present to his wife, who had borne him the long-awaited heir, Max Emanuel. Max Emanuel himself later played a significant role in expanding the palace layout.
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Imperial Palace
The Imperial Palace was completed in the year 1500 under Emperor Maximilian I (1459-1519). The palace was built to the same scale as is seen today and was captured as a watercolour by Albrecht Dürer. he painting shows a late Gothic courtyard with covered staircase, a Crest Tower and the women’s quarters (or “women’s rooms”). The reception area, which is known today as the “Gothic Cellar”, was built in the style of a large hall with columns and vaults. A “Kürnstube” (home to Maximilian’s hunting trophies), the “Silver chamber” (treasury) and the Festival Hall (with depictions of Hercules) are also reminders of the time. The “Rennplatz” square in front of the Imperial Palace served as a competition arena to please the sports-loving Emperor. Almost 250 years later, Maria Theresa (1717-1780) visited the Innsbruck palace and deemed it to be behind the times. There hadn’t been any Tyrolean princes since 1665 and the governor, who reigned Tyrol on behalf of the Emperor, lived in the governor’s quarters on the first floor. The representation rooms on the second floor, which were reserved for the Imperial family, were uninhabited. Maria Theresa arranged for the palace to be rebuilt in the Viennese late Baroque style and sent her best artists to Innsbruck: Konstantin von Walter and Nicolaus Parcassi. Martin van Meytens and his school and Franz Anton Maulbertsch were appointed for the interior. The renovations were interrupted by the Seven Years’ War and, therefore, only completed in the 1770s.
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Eremitage - Old Palace
Several kilometres outside the town, the Hermitage Palace, which later became known as the Old Palace, dominates the extensive park with its tree-covered slopes that rises above the Roter Main river.
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Schaezler Palace
City residence of the banker Liebert von Liebenhofen with a richly furnished rococo banqueting hall (1765-1770), today Germany’s most important baroque gallery.
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Linderhof Palace
Situated in the midst of the Bavarian Alpine foothills, Schloss Linderhof (Linderhof Palace) attracts visitors to the imperial villa with its spacious landscaped garden and impressive terraces.
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Imperial Castle
The Imperial Castle atop the rocky promontory above Nuremberg was one of the most important fortified imperial palaces of the Old Holy Roman Empire.
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Rectors Palace
Historical sources mention Rector´s Palace in Zadar as soon as the 13th century. From that time until today the edifice has gone through many changes including the last reconstruction and the opening on February 10th 2017.
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The Dogi Palace
The Dogi Palace represent the symbol and the hart of the political and administrative life of the Venetian Republic millenary history. In the halls of the palace the Doge and the council took all the decision about Venice and its life.
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