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Palaces in Berlin

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Charlottenburg Palace
Discover the magic of the rococo at the beautiful Charlottenburg Palace – once a royal summer residence, today Berlin’s largest and most magnificent palace. In the Neuer Flügel (New Wing), you can view the staterooms and the rococo ballroom known as the Goldene Galerie (Golden Gallery). The Silver Vault includes quite stunning tableware of gold, silver, glass and porcelain displayed on laid tables. Around 100 table services have survived intact, a vivid reminder of the magnificence of dining at court. The impressive display of the remaining pieces of the Prussian crown jewels, complete with the imperial insignias, as well as personal treasures, such as the elaborated designed, exquisite snuffboxes collected by Friedrich the Great, are also well worth seeing. The Porcelain Cabinet in the Old Palace offers a breathtaking collection of the finest blue-and-white porcelain decorating the entire room.
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The Gohlis Palace
In 1756, the Leipzig merchant and City Architect Johann Caspar Richter commissioned the building of a summer palace - the Gohlis Palace. Richter's architecture, the building's interior design and the orangery wings enclosing the building at either end make the palace a sterling example of Saxon Baroque architecture.
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Dresden Royal Palace
Dresden’s Royal Palace was once the hub of power for the Saxon princes and kings. First mentioned in the 14th century as a castle complex, the four-wing palace structure was developed in the 15th century. After it was destroyed by fire in 1701, the palace was reconstructed under Augustus the Strong. After air attacks during the last few months of the Second World War, the palace – with its approximately 500 halls and rooms – once again burned down to its foundations. Most of the valuable interior furnishings were lost. In 1985, reconstruction began on the palace to create a museum complex for the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (Dresden State Art Collections). The first museum to move into the Royal Palace was the Kupferstich-Kabinett (Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs); it has been displaying its treasures there since April 2004. The New Green Vault was opened in September 2004. Since September 2006, the Historic Green Vault can once again be admired in its original rooms. Today, the exterior of the Royal Palace is decorated in Neorenaissance style, while the large courtyard of the palace displays Renaissance-style sgraffito paintings. The Hausmann Tower overlooks the whole ensemble, offering a wonderful view of the Old Town. Starting in 2010, after five years of construction, the English Stairway in the Dresden Royal Palace is once again accessible. The Baroque stairway was reconstructed at a cost of four million euros, following its original historic pattern. In the future, it will serve as the main entrance for the museums of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen. The Türckische Cammer (Turkish Chamber) was also opened in March 2010, containing countless small treasures that were not open to the public for more than seventy years. The renovation of the Palace is completed since 2013.
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The Ducal Palace
It is the oldest building in Celle and it is regarded as one of the most splendid Guelphic palaces in Northern Germany.
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Wroclaw Royal Palace
From 2009 the palace is the main building of the City Museum of Wrocław and presents, among others the exhibition “1000 years of Wrocław”. The Royal Palace (Pałac Królewski) was called Spaetgen’s Palace, from the name of one of the first owners. In 1717 baron Heinrich G. Spaetgen bought a small baroque mansion close to Rynek. After his death in 1750, a Prussian King Frederick II bought the palace. It became a royal mansion, and Wrocław joined Berlin and Königsberg (today’s Kaliningrad) as a residence city. The next Prussian kings extended the palace, changed its design and character. In the middle of the 19th century the palace extended itself from Wolności Square to Kazimierza Wielkiego Street. After the fall of the empire the palace was taken by the city authorities, in the 20s the Palace Museum was opened. During World War II the building was seriously damaged.
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Ball House
In addition to the palace, the Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe is also home to another treasure, the Ball House. Though the building's outward appearance is quite plain, the interior is all more impressive with its spacious, splendidly arranged ballroom and crystal chandeliers.
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The Lions Castle
The Lion's Castle has a picturesque location in the Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe. From afar, it appears to visitors as a romantic knight’s castle from the Middle Ages. However, it was actually built between 1793 and 1801. Conceived as a pseudomedieval 'ancestral castle' by its commissioner, Landgrave Wilhelm IX of Hesse-Cassel, later Prince Elector Wilhelm I, Heinrich Christoph Jussow, the court’s master architect, realised the bold plans.
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Eremitage - Old Palace
Several kilometres outside the town, the Hermitage Palace, which later became known as the Old Palace, dominates the extensive park with its tree-covered slopes that rises above the Roter Main river.
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Christiansborg Palace
Christiansborg Palace, located on the tiny island of Slotsholmen, contains the Danish Parliament Folketinget, the Supreme Court, and the Ministry of State. Parts of the palace are used by the Royal Family for various functions and events. The Royal Reception Rooms include The Tower Room and The Oval Throne Room where foreign ambassadors to Denmark are received by the Queen. The Throne Room gives access to the balcony where the Danish monarchs are proclaimed.
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Frederiksberg Palace Gardens
Frederiksberg Palace Gardens is one of the largest and most attractive green spaces in Copenhagen. The park was landscaped during the reign of King Frederik IV from 1699–1730, as a baroque garden surrounding Frederiksberg Palace. The gardens now house the remains of the baroque garden and a romantic landscape garden, which held special significance for the popular King Frederik VI. The romantic landscape garden was changed during his reign from 1808–1839. Today, those wishing to sail along the canals like the king can hire boats from the boat service Svendsens Bådfart. In the summer, Frederiksberg Gardens form the setting for various cultural events, including the music festival Stella Polaris (August) and Midsummer’s Eve (June). Midsummer’s Eve is a particularly special evening in Frederiksberg, attracting some 35,000 visitors. There is a bonfire party by the water close to Frederiksberg Palace and entertainment aplenty.
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Amalienborg Palace
Amalienborg Palace is a must for anyone with a taste for royal history and the life of Denmark’s royal family who still resides inside the palace. Experience royal history at the museum and sense the present of one of the world's oldest monarchies from the beautiful palace square where you can watch the changing of the guards. Amalienborg is famous for its Royal Guard, called Den Kongelige Livgarde. Every day you can experience the changing of the guards, as they march from their barracks in 100 Gothersgade by Rosenborg Castle through the streets of Copenhagen and end up at Amalienborg, where the changing of the guard takes place at 12:00 noon.
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Imperial Castle
The Imperial Castle atop the rocky promontory above Nuremberg was one of the most important fortified imperial palaces of the Old Holy Roman Empire.
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The Residence Palace
The Residence Palace – The “Castle above all Castles”! The Residence Palace is one of Europe’s most renowned Baroque castles and has been registered as a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site in 1981.
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Kronborg Castle
Towering on a promontory in Northern Zealand, Kronborg faces the sound between Elsinore and Helsingborg in Sweden. Grand fortifications with bastions and casemates used to protect the Danish land from unwanted visitors and was home to the royal family until the late 1600 hundreds.
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Thurn and Taxis Palace
This magnificent palace emerged from the buildings of the former Benedictine monastery of St. Emmeram. In connection with the abolition of the postal rights the royal house of Thurn and Taxis purchased the greatest part of the monastery buildings in 1810 and extended them to make them their permanent residence.
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Johannisburg Palace
This palace, made of red sandstone, is one of the most significant and beautiful Renaissance buildings in Germany. Its unique features include the chapel (complete with Renaissance altar, pulpit and portal sculptures by Hans Juncker), the royal living quarters, the world's largest collection of architectural models made from cork, the state gallery with paintings by Lucas Cranach the Elder and the Palace Museum of Aschaffenburg that houses works by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Christian Schad.
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The Oborski Palace
The Oborski Palace at 73 Legions Street - this palace houses the Regional Museum and Municipal Cultural Centre. In the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries it was a manor house built on the banks of the River Visloka following the demolishment of the renaissance knights’ castle belonging to the Gryf-Mielecki family.
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The Electoral Palace
The Electoral Palace in Koblenz is one of the most important palatial buildings in the French early Classicism style in south-western Germany, and is one of the last residential palaces that was built in Germany shortly before the French revolution.
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Vienna Ringstrasse
The most beautiful boulevard in the world is home not only to many of Vienna's best-known sights, such as the Imperial Palace, the Kunsthistorisches Museum and the Natural History Museum, the Vienna State Opera and Parliament. Magnificent palaces, extensive parks and important monuments also line the "display window" of the former Danube monarchy. Vienna's Ringstrasse is 5.3 kilometers long. Long enough to provide space for numerous monumental buildings, which were built during the period of Historicism in the 1860s to 1890s. Today, the buildings that stand there – from the Vienna State Opera to the Museum of Fine Arts – are among the most important sights in the city of Vienna. Nobles and rich citizens hurried to build pompous palaces along this magnificent boulevard. Many of these former private homes can still be admired today (mostly, however, only from the outside). The style in which the buildings were built went down in history as the Ringstrasse style (a type of Historicism). It is marked by a pluralism of styles: numerous architectural forms of previous epochs were imitated.
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Lustheim Palace
Exemplary pleasure palace with novel (for the time) ceiling frescoes. Maximilian Emanuel's "hunting palace" was built to celebrate his marriage to the Emperor's daughter, Maria Antonia, in June 1685. The palace houses an outstanding collection of Meissen porcelain from the Ernst Schneider Foundation. The collection includes over 2,000 valuable plates, table centerpieces and animal figures, and is surpassed only by the collection in the Dresdner Zwinger Palace.
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Schaezler Palace
City residence of the banker Liebert von Liebenhofen with a richly furnished rococo banqueting hall (1765-1770), today Germany’s most important baroque gallery.
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Rheydt House
A trip to Mönchengladbach would not be complete without a visit to Rheydt House, the beautifully preserved Renaissance palace.
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Nymphenburg Palace
The baroque palace in the west part of Munich was the summer residence of the Bavarian monarchs. Five generations of Wittelsbach rulers were involved in the construction of this stately ensemble, which houses several outstanding collections. With its lavishly decorated interior and the famous "Gallery of Beauties" commissioned by Ludwig I, the palace is one of Munich's favorite attractions. Among the highlights are the former bedroom of King Ludwig II and the impressive banquet hall with fine ceiling frescoes by Johann Baptist Zimmermann. The Nymphenburg Palace west of Munich is one of the largest royal palaces in Europe and is not to be missed on a sight-seeing tour through the Bavarian capital city. The oft-visited Baroque tourist attraction with it’s expansive landscaped garden and museum draws not only guests from around the world, but is also a beloved institution for Munich residents. In 1664, Prince Ferdinand Maria had the castle built as a present to his wife, who had borne him the long-awaited heir, Max Emanuel. Max Emanuel himself later played a significant role in expanding the palace layout.
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Munich Residence
The Munich Residence served as the seat of government and residence of the Bavarian dukes, electors and kings from 1508 to 1918. What began in 1385 as a castle in the north-eastern corner of the city (the Neuveste, or new citadel), was transformed by the rulers over the centuries into a magnificent palace, its buildings and gardens extending further and further into the town. The rooms and art collections spanning a period that begins with the Renaissance, and extends via the early Baroque and Rococo epochs to Neoclassicism, bear witness to the discriminating taste and the political ambition of the Wittelsbach dynasty. Much of the Residence was destroyed during the Second World War, and from 1945 it was gradually reconstructed. Today, with the museums of the Bavarian Palace Administration (the Residence Museum itself, the Treasury and the Cuvilliés Theatre) along with other cultural institutions, this is one of the largest museum complexes in Bavaria.
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Wickrath Palace
The Wickrath Palace, which is surrounded by a lake and romantic parklands close to the river Niers.
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Schlossplatz Stuttgart (Palace Square)
Stuttgart's Palace Square is the vibrant heart of the city, but at the same time it's a place to linger, within easy walking distance of many of the city's attractions. Palace Square is therefore Stuttgart's hub and an integral part of any stroll through town. In 2006 pictures of Palace Square went round the world, when 60 000 fans turned it into a sea of black, red and gold flags at the public screenings during the football World Cup.
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Zypendaal House
Zypendaal House (Huis Zypendaal) is an old-style country house dating from 1762. The ground floor is open to the public. The costly furnishings and many souvenirs of the Brantsen family, the house's former residents, give the house a very intimate feel.
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Frisian Castle
The first buildings to be built in Friesland using natural stone or bricks were stone refuge towers, known in Friesland as ‘stinzen’. ‘Stins’ means stone. These squat towers with rounded peaks served as a refuge for their owners, the farming gentry. These people were the rural aristocracy in Friesland, which had no earls or counts before 1500.
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Hofburg Imperial Palace
Vienna's Imperial Palace is one of the biggest palace complexes in the world. The oldest parts date to the 13th century, with construction having continued right into the 20th century. The Imperial Palace was the residence and seat of government of the Habsburg emperors until 1918. Today, it is home to numerous museums with outstanding collections, the Spanish Riding School, a congress center, the seat of the Austrian Federal President as well as the historic Heldenplatz.
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Museum of King Jan III's Palace at Wilanow
Wilanów Palace is a true pearl of Baroque architecture in Warsaw. Learn about King Jan III Sobieski, who successfully fended off the Turks in the battle of Vienna and who lived in Wilanów with his beloved Marysieńka. Take a walk in the park and tour the palace interiors; see the portrait gallery and listen to stories of great romances. The building and the park have both kept their original form, despite the partition, war, and occupation. See the home of King Jan III Sobieski, the vanquisher of the Turks at Vienna, who in 1683 stopped their march through Europe. The ruler, who gained the nickname of the fearless Lion of Lechistan, lived in the palace with his beloved wife, Maria. In the palace, you will see the king’s apartments and the suites of Queen Maria Kazimiera, which include the Chinese, Dutch and Antiquities rooms and the Potocki Museum. Stop for a moment in the White Room to see images of other palace owners and people associated with it. Wilanów Palace is a must-see when visiting Warsaw. In the wintertime, the venue, illuminated with thousands of lamps, transforms into the Royal Garden of Lights.
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Schoenbrunn Palace
The former summer residence of the Habsburgs impresses with imperial ceremonial rooms and magnificent gardens. Maria Theresa, Emperor Franz Joseph, Empress Elisabeth and others once resided here. Schönbrunn Palace is one of Europe's most beautiful Baroque complexes and has been in the possession of the Habsburgs since 1569. The wife of Emperor Ferdinand II, Eleonore von Gonzaga, had a pleasure palace built on the site in 1642 and called the property "Schönbrunn" for the first time. The palace and garden complex created from 1696 onwards following the siege of Vienna was complete redesigned under Maria Theresa after 1743. Today, due to its historical significance, its unique layout and magnificent furnishings, the palace is a UNESCO World Heritage site.
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Karlsruhe Palace
Karlsruhe's palace was built between 1715 and 1718. For almost 200 years it served as the residence and seat of government of the margraves, the electoral princes and grand dukes of Baden.
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Mirabell Palace and Gardens
Mirabell Palace was built in 1606 by prince-archbishop Wolf Dietrich for his beloved Salome Alt. Today, it serves as the backdrop for the most romantic weddings you could possibly imagine. Mirabell Palace looks back on a colorful history. Today, Mirabell Palace is home to municipal offices as well as those of the mayor of Salzburg. Mirabell Gardens – Baroque pleasure gardens in the heart of the city. They were completely redesigned under archbishop Johann Ernst von Thun in 1690. The underlying geometric form, which is typical for the Baroque, is still clearly recognizable. The visual orientation towards the cathedral and fortress adds to the grandeur of the gardens – simultaneously incorporating them into the overall historical ensemble of the city. Mirabell Gardens, along with the Felsenreitschule and Nonnberg Convent, is one of the most important shooting locations from the famous Hollywood musical “The Sound of Music”. In the film, Maria and the children dance around the Pegasus Fountain in front of the palace, singing the song “Do Re Mi”. At the end of the scene, the Trapp family stand on the steps in front of the Rose Hill and sing the song’s final bars. At the same time, viewers are enchanted by unique views across Mirabell Gardens towards the fortress.
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Hellbrunn Palace & Trick Fountains
For more than 400 years, Hellbrunn Palace has enchanted and amazed its visitors with its trick fountains. A unique experience with all kinds of surprises in store! The idyllic location in the south of Salzburg was ideal in many regards: Hellbrunn Mountain is a naturally abundant source of water, which inevitably became a central design feature of the palace grounds. The centerpiece is provided by Mannerist trick fountains that are absolutely unique. From a mechanical theater to water-spewing stags, to a crown dancing atop a spout of water - the many-and-varied hydraulic attractions never fail to captivate visitors with their originality and astonishing effects. The spacious parks and gardens of Hellbrunn Palace are partially landscaped, partially natural biotope. They are a marvelous place to unwind, take a walk and enjoy a bit of outdoor sport. Children will immediately be drawn to the big adventure playground. And in winter, too, Hellbrunn is always well worth a visit: During the run-up to Christmas, the palace courtyard and the old driveway are transformed into a festive Advent market.