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Markets in Prague

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Czechia
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Old Town Square
Where does the true heart of Prague beat? On the Old Town Square of course! It is precisely here that winding lanes of the Old Town run, in order to spill out onto the most beautiful square in Prague. The elegant tower of the Town Hall with the world famous astronomical clock, the proud silhouette of the fairytale Týn Cathedral, the monumental Church of St. Nicholas and countless multicoloured houses of many styles lend this place a unique atmosphere, which will captivate all those who decide to take a look at its charm. Over the thousand years of its existence, the Old Town Square has been a silent witness to important events in Czech history. History left its mark here in the form of important demonstrations, executions but also weddings, tournaments and political meetings.
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Republic square
Pilsen's main square of the Republic is dominated by the beautiful Gothic cathedral of St. Bartholomew with the highest church tower in the Czech Republic. You will find many beautiful historic houses, lots of cafes and restaurants. During the year there are dozens of cultural events, festivals and festivals.
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Masarykovo Square
Exiting Břežanova Street, we find ourselves on the western side of Masarykovo Square, just across from the castle gate with the Rožmberk coat-of arms. The rectangular shape of this small square comes from its former function as a marketplace, and the burgher houses were gradually built around it. The square is lined on each side with thirteen burgher houses built on extended Gothic sites with typical Renaissance and Baroque gables. On the right hand are two buildings (no. 106 and 107) that belong to the Zlatá Hvězda Hotel. They are connected with three illusive neo-Baroque gables which give the impression of three adjacent buildings instead of two. House no. 107 has a renovated original arcade and decorated semicircular and cross vaults.
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Jelenia Gora Town Hall
In the central point of the market square there is a building of the town hall. The entire square is surrounded by Baroque tenement houses with arcades, which originally used to serve the merchants to sell their goods. The tenement houses near the market place were settled by the richest citizens – traders, craftsmen, and stallholders – this was evidenced by rich ornaments of the buildings; these were removed in 1960s during a reconstruction of the façades. The arcades were full of drapers’ and furriers’ stalls, bread benches and shambles.
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The Old Town Hall and the Market Place
The Old Town Hall can truly be said to live up to its name - the cornerstone was laid in the year 1556. Since 1909, and still today, it has served as the Museum of City History.
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Rynek of Wroclaw
Rynek of Wrocław has 3.8ha of surface and belongs to the biggest market places in Poland (the bigger ones are in Kraków and Olecko). However, the Late Gothic Town Hall with its 66m tower is the biggest building of this kind in Poland.
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Market Square and Leipziger StraSSe
While in particular large department stores are located around the market square, the lower part of the Leipziger Straße accommodates Halle’s fashion centre, with many well known fashion companies having their boutiques here.
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Stodolni Street
The main attraction in Ostrava is the technical monuments, but the city does also have something to offer apart from this and you most certainly won’t be bored here. It is said of Stodolní that it never sleeps and if you visit this street, you certainly won’t be getting any sleep either.
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Alexanderplatz
Alexanderplatz has always been one of the liveliest places in Berlin, with shops, cinemas, restaurants, and many attractions within walking distance. Alexanderplatz in Mitte is one of the best-known public squares in Berlin – and it’s certainly the biggest. Named after Tsar Alexander I, who visited the Prussian capital in 1805, most people simply call it Alex. Also in the winter you will find several Christmas markets at Alexanderplatz: at the Rotes Rathaus, at the Alexa shopping centre and around the world clock.
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Marienplatz
Marienplatz is the central square in Old Town, Munich’s urban heart and the central point of the pedestrian zone. To the north is the magnificent neo-Gothic Neues Rathaus (“New Town Hall”), to the east the Altes Rathaus (“Old Town Hall”), and the passageway to Tal and the Viktualienmarkt (farmers’ market). To the south, the square is bordered by stores, office buildings, and restaurants. To the west, the pedestrian zone opens to Kaufingerstraße, which ends at the Karlstor (gate) located at the square known by locals as Stachus. Marienplatz has been the center of Munich since it was founded in 1158 and is the heart of the city. In the first few centuries, the approximately 100 x 50 meter large area was used as the central marketplace, which is attested to today by the fish fountain on the northeast corner of Marienplatz. In 1638 Elector Maximilian I had the Mariensäule (Mary’s Column) erected in gratitude for the city being spared during the Thirty Years’ War; Marienplatz takes its name from the Mariensäule. The column is used as a reference point in land surveying as the topological center of Bavaria. Today Marienplatz is a center for festivities and political, cultural, or sports events. During Advent, Munich’s oldest traditional Christmas market (“Christkindlmarkt”) takes place here.
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The Bazar
he Bazar building was erected in the years 1838-42 on the initiative of Karol Marcinkowski who contributed to the establishment of the Bazar Poznański joint stock company. The Neoclassical edifice faced Nowa Street (now I. Paderewskiego Street) which was marked out at the same time and the project was supervised by a local builder Antoni Krzyżanowski (following a design by Ernest Steudener).
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Aschaffenburg Old Town
The route from Johannisburg Palace to the town hall is a labyrinth of narrow alleys, where traditional bars and quaint restaurants occupy pretty little half-timbered buildings.
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Benedictine Market
Klagenfurt’s Benedictine Market in downtown Klagenfurt offers everything your heart could possibly desire. What a wonderful hustle and bustle there is in front of the market stands when, on Thursday and Saturday between 6:30 a.m. and 1 p.m., farmers from across Carinthia as well as neighboring Friuli in Italy and Slovenia, offer their products. Aside from delicious foods and fresh grocery items, at the market itself as well as in the neighboring streets you will come across ample opportunities to enjoy a delicious cup of coffee, a small snack and a good chat.
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Florianska Street
This is where the action happens, so to speak. All year round, the cobbled, pedestrian surface of Floriańska Street is the théâtre de l’action of the city, and the venae cavae to Kraków’s massive central square. It’s something of a modern stage for the unending drama of the city’s Old Town, where the players are tourists and locals alike, and the set pieces are the magnificent medieval façades of some of the most prestigious buildings in the city.
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Covered Market
Covered Market was built in 1904, in neogothic-modernist style, designed by the architecture company Boswau and Knauer GmbH of Berlin. The main entrance with two towers and the city coat of arms is highly interesting.
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Market Hall Stuttgart
Behind the heavy entrance doors of this grand art nouveau building a paradise of lucullan pleasures is hidden: Aceto Balsamico and honey mead, Baklawa and exotic spices - a touch of the Mediterranean and the Orient blows through the spacious halls. Poultry, fish and meat of a high quality are always a standard in the market hall.
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Old Town Hall and St. Sebastian Church
The baroque backdrop for the market held here three times a week is formed by the ensemble of the old town hall and the parish church of St. Sebastian - which is incidentally Mannheim's oldest building. If you happen to lose track of time in the hustle and bustle of the market, two clocks and a bell tower are on hand to bring you back to the here and now. What's more, a glockenspiel sounds from the tower three times a day, charming more people than merely the wedding couple exchanging vows inside the walls. You can immerse yourself in Mannheim's internationality directly behind the marketplace. The predominantly Turkish-influenced district with its small shops and delicacies like baklava and pide can easily turn your thoughts to your next holiday. The huge selection of bridal and evening wear on offer here draws customers from over 150 kilometers away.
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The City Market
Fresh food and groceries which are prepared daily are becoming a more important part of everyday life, and in the Varaždin market this trend is confirmed. In the flurry of trading you can buy fruit and vegetables, as well as other culinary delights that arrive fresh every morning from family farms in Varaždin and its surroundings.
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Bregenz markets
An important component that refines Bregenz city life is the weekly markets. Guests experience the markets as places of encounters that invite one to discover a variety of culinary delights and specialities. Locals, too, take advantage of the appealing opportunity to find tasteful, high-quality products for kitchen and household. Hospitableness and down-to-earthness characterise the city’s market bustle. An inspiring wealth of culinary art vivifies the streets and squares, which invite one on a delightful journey of discovery.
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Market Square (Marktplatz)
The market square (Marktplatz) is in all probability the best-known square in Karlsruhe. Situated on it is the city's hallmark, the pyramid, built in 1823 as well as the municipal protestant church, the town hall, and the market fountain. Images Information
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Alter Markt (Old Market Square)
In the heart of Bielefeld’s old town lies the Old Market Square, surrounded by imposing historic facades and ornate gables. The impressive Patrician houses are well worth seeing, a main attraction being the Crüwell House with its late Gothic stepped gable dating from 1530.
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Dolac Market
Dolac market nurtures it’s 80+ years old tradition as Zagreb’s main flea or open-air farmers’ market. You will feel the vibe of the town and experience local flavours. Traders from all over Croatia colour the Dolac market with locally grown produce. But be careful there are imported goods as well… At the Dolac market, you will find fresh and local produce. There is a fish market, butcheries, healthy food stands, fresh pasta vendors, bakeries, cheesemongers, flowers, souvenirs, fruit and vegetables. Locals love to buy fresh food at the open-air markets. Basically, every neighbourhood has its own farmers’ market, but the Dolac market is the biggest and the most famous one. The market operates mainly in the morning. Although the official working hours are up until 3 PM, the safest time to visit is until 1 PM.
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Warsaw's Old Town
Warsaw’s Old Town (Stare Miasto) is the historical center of Warsaw and the oldest part of town dating back to the 13th century. Situated in the middle of the Old Town is the beautiful market square with its good variety of restaurants. The largest part of the Old Town was destroyed during the Second World War and was later reconstructed. The reconstruction was so precise that one can hardly tell if the the building survived the war or if it was rebuilt. This was honored by the UNESCO who in 1980 added the Warsaw Old Town to its list of World Heritage Sites. The Old Town is also a great place for purchasing souvenirs of Warsaw, as several souvenir stores are located here. The Old Town is located close to most city hotels, you can find it in southern direction from the New Town and north of Krakowskie Przedmiescie (which begins at the Castle Square).
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Bahnhofstrasse
One of Zurich's must-dos is a stroll along the sleek storefronts of Bahnhofstrasse. Stretching across Old Town from Hauptbahnhof station to Lake Zurich, Bahnhofstrasse features a variety of high-end shops, including Louis Vuitton, Burberry, Chanel and Giorgio Armani. Swiss shops like the dessert-focused Confiserie Sprungli and the jewelry-centric Gubelin AG can also be found here. According to recent travelers, if it's budget shopping you're after, head to the Niederdorf and Langstrasse areas instead of Bahnhofstrasse. Though Bahnhofstrasse is free to visit, this shopping area is better suited for window shopping, unless you're prepared to drop some serious cash during your visit.
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Korzo
Rijeka is reflected in Korzo, at Korzo you can read Rijeka. Anyone who, at least once, had a coffee at one of the terraces of numerous and picturesque café bars lined along this unusual promenade, would agree.
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Burano Island
Burano is amongst the main islands of the Venetian lagoon. At the moment about 3000 people live there and it is part of the municipality of Venice. It is linked to the smaller island of Mazzorbo by a small bridge. Just like Venice, it is divided into “Sestieri” (districts): San Martino Sinistro, San Martino Destro, San Mauro, Terranova and Giudecca (not to be confused with the homonymous island). The isle of Burano is famous for the lace working art, (a tradition since the XVI century), its bright multicoloured houses and for the culinary traditions.
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Market
The central square is the Old Town Square with the City Hall and the well of the seventeenth century. The current market differs slightly from the original fifteenth-century appearance - only three frontages of houses are built, which over the centuries underwent reconstructions. They are hotels, restaurants, clubs, pubs, museums, various institutions.
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Arnsberg Old Market
Arnsberg's historic heartbeats at the Old Market Square with its belfry, Old Town Hall (1710), "The Crimea" and Maximilianbrunnen (1779). The Madonna in the niche at the town hall has survived many city fires and bears witness to an eventful history. On the side of the town hall is the symbol of Cologne rule in Arnsberg. The wonderfully renovated patrician building "Zur Krim" is reminiscent of a dark chapter in legal history, because the witch judge of Arnsberg once lived in it. The bell tower - the symbol of the city - forms the "parlor" Arnsberg with the old town hall (1710) and the Maximilianbrunnen, framed by patrician and half-timbered houses. The bell tower was part of the former city fortifications in Arnsberg and is one of the oldest buildings in Arnsberg. He found a first written mention in a document by Count Gottfried III. from the year 1236, in which it was about the expansion of the city area towards the monastery Wedinghausen. With the execution of this plan, the tower lost its function as a defensive tower and served only as an inner-city gate. For centuries, the top of the tower consisted of a tent-like roof with four small corner towers. It was only around 1723 that the tower received its baroque onion dome after a city fire, which was preserved until 1945.
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Rialto Bridge and its Market
The Rialto Bridge is the first one built across the Grand Canal. In the beginning it was a wooden drawbridge to permit sailing ships to sail from St. Marks Basin to Piazzale Roma area. Only in 1588 the bridge was rebuilt in a sort of white marble called istrian stone, a trademark for most of Venetian artworks (an opera by Arch. Antonio da Ponte) until 1854 the only one spanning across the Grand Canal. It’ s 22 meters wide and 48 meters long a unique arcade 7,5 meters high, crowned by several smaller arcades it’ s crossed with three parallel staircases, The one in the centre has double arcades on both sides, shops and stores are host below the archway, on the niches. The Rialto area is well known for its famous market, open every day (Sunday closed), from San Polo area to the bridge. The market Is frequented mostly by venetian citizens, a continuous passage of people, boats and carriage of fruits, vegetables and fish make of it the most alive part of the city, many tipical trattoria and osterie, serving local wines and food can be founded around, simple but delicious dishes. Venetian called it “Erbaria” and sice ever it has been the main marketplace of the city, in the past ( now the wholesale market has been moved to another part of the city) dozen and dozen of boats loaded with all kind of goodies from the islands and mainland cultivations.
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The Dluga Street and the Dlugi Targ Street
The Długa and Długi Targ Streets which are also known as Trakt Królewski (the Royal Route) rank among the most beautiful streets in Gdańsk. The wealthiest Gdańsk patricians used to live there and almost every tenement house has its own interesting history to tell.
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Hof and Koerbergasse
Located between the Puppenbrunnen, the city hall and the Bahkauv, the Hof square has something to offer everyone, and is a good place to spend a few hours with its restaurants, bars and cafés. Take a break here, lean back and take it easy, Aachen-style. Starting from the Hof, walk down the Medieval-style Körbergasse, past the traditionalist Plum’s Kaffee coffee roasting house and the basket weaver’s “Korb Bayer”, which first opened its doors in 1865, until you reach a symbol of the city: the “Printenmädchen”, or “little gingerbread girl”. Now enter Aachen’s oldest coffee shop, the Alt Aachener Café-Stuben van den Daele, which was founded in 1890. The rooms, which are full of nooks and crannies, and the many stairs in this historic building, give the café its particular charm.
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Maastricht Market
The best-known market in Maastricht is the one held on the square of the same name, Markt. Surrounding by stately mansions and the imposing city hall, Maastricht’s main market is set up here every Wednesday and Friday.
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Houwerzijl Tea Museum
The tea factory and tea museum are housed in an old church and parsonage. Learn all there is to know about the production and different kinds of tea. The tearoom has the most extensive tea menu in the world, and there are different kinds of tea available in the tea shop.
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Farmers Markets
The most trendy of the Amsterdam markets, has began in 1987 when Adri Vallentin, then owner of the popular cafe called Winkel (English: Shop) on the Noordermarkt, has setup nine biological food stalls, hoping to draw more clients on Saturday morning to his cafe. Traditional market of pigeons and canaries, which for a century stood on Noordermarkt each Saturday morning faltered, but the idea of biological food quickly picked up with the public, and today The Farmers Market on the Noordermarkt is so popular, that it draws crowds not only from the nearby Jordaan, but also from the whole city