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Markets in Amsterdam

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Jordaan
The Jordaan is possibly the most famous neighbourhood in the Netherlands. Akin to the reputation enjoyed by London’s Cockneys, this once working-class bastion was renowned for tight community bonds, radical politics and a love for drink and over-the-top sing-a-longs. Gentrification of decades past has attracted more galleries, restaurants, specialty shops and upwardly-mobile residents to its scenic streets but there’s undeniably still a distinct atmosphere to be enjoyed here. The Jordaan begins at Brouwersgracht, just west of the Amsterdam Central Station and arches around the western side of Canal Ring between Prinsengracht and Lijnbaansgracht before ending at Leidsegracht. The area north of Rozengracht is a more ‘touristy’ and commercial section, although the quieter area to the south is no less scenic.
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Farmers Markets
The most trendy of the Amsterdam markets, has began in 1987 when Adri Vallentin, then owner of the popular cafe called Winkel (English: Shop) on the Noordermarkt, has setup nine biological food stalls, hoping to draw more clients on Saturday morning to his cafe. Traditional market of pigeons and canaries, which for a century stood on Noordermarkt each Saturday morning faltered, but the idea of biological food quickly picked up with the public, and today The Farmers Market on the Noordermarkt is so popular, that it draws crowds not only from the nearby Jordaan, but also from the whole city
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De Markthal
You'll find an indoor market hall in various world-class cities, but the combination with luxury housing makes Rotterdam's Markthal the first of its kind. The apartments are draped over the food market in a horseshoe configuration.
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Grote Markt
Grote Markt originally was a forum or square just outside the medieval residential quarter. In 1220 Duke Henry I of Brabant (1165-1235) donated this community land to the city. The name Merckt was used for the first time in 1310. Around this time the first annual markets or foren van Brabant (Brabant fairs) were organised. Here English merchants would do business with Italians, Spaniards and merchants from the Northern German Hanseatic cities as well as from Southern Germany and Flemings of course. At the end of the fifteenth century Antwerp overtook Bruges as the most prominent city of the Low Countries.
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Houwerzijl Tea Museum
The tea factory and tea museum are housed in an old church and parsonage. Learn all there is to know about the production and different kinds of tea. The tearoom has the most extensive tea menu in the world, and there are different kinds of tea available in the tea shop.
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Markt
Markt is the heart of the city and surrounded by many historical highlights. It is filled with pedestrians and bicyclists and a perfect place to get some rest or food in a local restaurant. Markt is dominated by its Belfry, for centuries the city’s foremost edifice and the perfect look-out in case of war, fire or any other calamity. You can still climb to the top of the tower! The statue of Jan Breydel and Pieter de Coninck graces the middle of the square. These two popular heroes of Bruges resisted French oppression and consequently played an important part during the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. Their statue neatly looks out onto the Gothic revival style Provincial Palace. Until the 18th century this used to be the extremely busy Waterhalle, a covered warehouse where goods were loaded and unloaded along the canals that ran alongside the square. Today the canals are still there, albeit underground.
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Maastricht Market
The best-known market in Maastricht is the one held on the square of the same name, Markt. Surrounding by stately mansions and the imposing city hall, Maastricht’s main market is set up here every Wednesday and Friday.
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Hof and Koerbergasse
Located between the Puppenbrunnen, the city hall and the Bahkauv, the Hof square has something to offer everyone, and is a good place to spend a few hours with its restaurants, bars and cafés. Take a break here, lean back and take it easy, Aachen-style. Starting from the Hof, walk down the Medieval-style Körbergasse, past the traditionalist Plum’s Kaffee coffee roasting house and the basket weaver’s “Korb Bayer”, which first opened its doors in 1865, until you reach a symbol of the city: the “Printenmädchen”, or “little gingerbread girl”. Now enter Aachen’s oldest coffee shop, the Alt Aachener Café-Stuben van den Daele, which was founded in 1890. The rooms, which are full of nooks and crannies, and the many stairs in this historic building, give the café its particular charm.
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Arnsberg Old Market
Arnsberg's historic heartbeats at the Old Market Square with its belfry, Old Town Hall (1710), "The Crimea" and Maximilianbrunnen (1779). The Madonna in the niche at the town hall has survived many city fires and bears witness to an eventful history. On the side of the town hall is the symbol of Cologne rule in Arnsberg. The wonderfully renovated patrician building "Zur Krim" is reminiscent of a dark chapter in legal history, because the witch judge of Arnsberg once lived in it. The bell tower - the symbol of the city - forms the "parlor" Arnsberg with the old town hall (1710) and the Maximilianbrunnen, framed by patrician and half-timbered houses. The bell tower was part of the former city fortifications in Arnsberg and is one of the oldest buildings in Arnsberg. He found a first written mention in a document by Count Gottfried III. from the year 1236, in which it was about the expansion of the city area towards the monastery Wedinghausen. With the execution of this plan, the tower lost its function as a defensive tower and served only as an inner-city gate. For centuries, the top of the tower consisted of a tent-like roof with four small corner towers. It was only around 1723 that the tower received its baroque onion dome after a city fire, which was preserved until 1945.
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Grand Place of Tournai
The Grand Place of Tournai, a place of relaxation in a prestigious setting. Taste the conviviality of a Grand-Place animated by the terraces of numerous cafes and restaurants. From the rue Saint-Martin, the rue des Maux or the Place de l'Eveche, join one of the most beautiful and authentic Grand Place in the country! Triangular in shape, it is the perfect place to enjoy one of our typical dishes or one of our local beers. On sunny days, it's a whole neighborhood that comes alive, rocked by the sound of water jets and child players. The terraces fill up, the little sweet pleasures are tasted, the chime sounds for the delight of music lovers. Place of exchange, market and events, the Grand Place radiates throughout the City of 5 Clochers!
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Alter Markt (Old Market Square)
In the heart of Bielefeld’s old town lies the Old Market Square, surrounded by imposing historic facades and ornate gables. The impressive Patrician houses are well worth seeing, a main attraction being the Crüwell House with its late Gothic stepped gable dating from 1530.
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Aschaffenburg Old Town
The route from Johannisburg Palace to the town hall is a labyrinth of narrow alleys, where traditional bars and quaint restaurants occupy pretty little half-timbered buildings.
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Old Town Hall and St. Sebastian Church
The baroque backdrop for the market held here three times a week is formed by the ensemble of the old town hall and the parish church of St. Sebastian - which is incidentally Mannheim's oldest building. If you happen to lose track of time in the hustle and bustle of the market, two clocks and a bell tower are on hand to bring you back to the here and now. What's more, a glockenspiel sounds from the tower three times a day, charming more people than merely the wedding couple exchanging vows inside the walls. You can immerse yourself in Mannheim's internationality directly behind the marketplace. The predominantly Turkish-influenced district with its small shops and delicacies like baklava and pide can easily turn your thoughts to your next holiday. The huge selection of bridal and evening wear on offer here draws customers from over 150 kilometers away.
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The Lanes
Get lost in Leicester’s Lanes, whose winding cobbled streets bristle with fantastic independent stores. Selling everything from classic styles to one-off pieces to make a statement in your home or wardrobe, The Lanes has something to suit all tastes.
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Market Square (Marktplatz)
The market square (Marktplatz) is in all probability the best-known square in Karlsruhe. Situated on it is the city's hallmark, the pyramid, built in 1823 as well as the municipal protestant church, the town hall, and the market fountain. Images Information
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Danish Mead - Billund Brewery
All delicacies for your Billund visit! Billund Brewery brews mead, as the Vikings drank it. And you are more than welcome to have a taste!
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Market Square and Leipziger StraSSe
While in particular large department stores are located around the market square, the lower part of the Leipziger Straße accommodates Halle’s fashion centre, with many well known fashion companies having their boutiques here.
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Market Hall Stuttgart
Behind the heavy entrance doors of this grand art nouveau building a paradise of lucullan pleasures is hidden: Aceto Balsamico and honey mead, Baklawa and exotic spices - a touch of the Mediterranean and the Orient blows through the spacious halls. Poultry, fish and meat of a high quality are always a standard in the market hall.
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Shrewsbury Market Hall
Beneath Shrewsbury’s iconic clocktower is the town’s award-winning indoor market. Cosmopolitan cafés, artisan producers, vintage sellers, quality gift boutiques, artists and craftspeople all thrive alongside traditional fresh fruit and veg stalls and family butchers who have been trading for up to 100 years. Diners can enjoy some of the most creative food in town – authentic Beijing dumplings at a Chinese tea house, champagne and oysters at a continental-style seafood bar, Spanish tapas, sizzling Thai street food and more. The market is home to a community of talented artists and skilled craftspeople. Watch weavers, jewellery makers and artists at work. There is even a resident art gallery. A retro and vintage trail embraces clothing, collectables, antiques, books and vinyl records And if that’s not enough, visitors can indulge in chocolates made by our national award-winning chocolatier, buy a bicycle or get a quick make-over at Risdon’s barbershop. Main trading days are Tuesday, Wednesday, Fridays and Saturday, although some stallholders also trade on Thursday.
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The Old Town Hall and the Market Place
The Old Town Hall can truly be said to live up to its name - the cornerstone was laid in the year 1556. Since 1909, and still today, it has served as the Museum of City History.
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Blackpool Beach
There’s nothing quite like a day at the seaside, and Blackpool is one of the best beach resorts you will find in the UK. It was even recently awarded its first ever Blue Flag, putting it on par with other world renowned sites including the Mediterranean Sea and the Pacific coastline.
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Alexanderplatz
Alexanderplatz has always been one of the liveliest places in Berlin, with shops, cinemas, restaurants, and many attractions within walking distance. Alexanderplatz in Mitte is one of the best-known public squares in Berlin – and it’s certainly the biggest. Named after Tsar Alexander I, who visited the Prussian capital in 1805, most people simply call it Alex. Also in the winter you will find several Christmas markets at Alexanderplatz: at the Rotes Rathaus, at the Alexa shopping centre and around the world clock.
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Bahnhofstrasse
One of Zurich's must-dos is a stroll along the sleek storefronts of Bahnhofstrasse. Stretching across Old Town from Hauptbahnhof station to Lake Zurich, Bahnhofstrasse features a variety of high-end shops, including Louis Vuitton, Burberry, Chanel and Giorgio Armani. Swiss shops like the dessert-focused Confiserie Sprungli and the jewelry-centric Gubelin AG can also be found here. According to recent travelers, if it's budget shopping you're after, head to the Niederdorf and Langstrasse areas instead of Bahnhofstrasse. Though Bahnhofstrasse is free to visit, this shopping area is better suited for window shopping, unless you're prepared to drop some serious cash during your visit.
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Bregenz markets
An important component that refines Bregenz city life is the weekly markets. Guests experience the markets as places of encounters that invite one to discover a variety of culinary delights and specialities. Locals, too, take advantage of the appealing opportunity to find tasteful, high-quality products for kitchen and household. Hospitableness and down-to-earthness characterise the city’s market bustle. An inspiring wealth of culinary art vivifies the streets and squares, which invite one on a delightful journey of discovery.
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Republic square
Pilsen's main square of the Republic is dominated by the beautiful Gothic cathedral of St. Bartholomew with the highest church tower in the Czech Republic. You will find many beautiful historic houses, lots of cafes and restaurants. During the year there are dozens of cultural events, festivals and festivals.
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Marienplatz
Marienplatz is the central square in Old Town, Munich’s urban heart and the central point of the pedestrian zone. To the north is the magnificent neo-Gothic Neues Rathaus (“New Town Hall”), to the east the Altes Rathaus (“Old Town Hall”), and the passageway to Tal and the Viktualienmarkt (farmers’ market). To the south, the square is bordered by stores, office buildings, and restaurants. To the west, the pedestrian zone opens to Kaufingerstraße, which ends at the Karlstor (gate) located at the square known by locals as Stachus. Marienplatz has been the center of Munich since it was founded in 1158 and is the heart of the city. In the first few centuries, the approximately 100 x 50 meter large area was used as the central marketplace, which is attested to today by the fish fountain on the northeast corner of Marienplatz. In 1638 Elector Maximilian I had the Mariensäule (Mary’s Column) erected in gratitude for the city being spared during the Thirty Years’ War; Marienplatz takes its name from the Mariensäule. The column is used as a reference point in land surveying as the topological center of Bavaria. Today Marienplatz is a center for festivities and political, cultural, or sports events. During Advent, Munich’s oldest traditional Christmas market (“Christkindlmarkt”) takes place here.
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Old Town Square
Where does the true heart of Prague beat? On the Old Town Square of course! It is precisely here that winding lanes of the Old Town run, in order to spill out onto the most beautiful square in Prague. The elegant tower of the Town Hall with the world famous astronomical clock, the proud silhouette of the fairytale Týn Cathedral, the monumental Church of St. Nicholas and countless multicoloured houses of many styles lend this place a unique atmosphere, which will captivate all those who decide to take a look at its charm. Over the thousand years of its existence, the Old Town Square has been a silent witness to important events in Czech history. History left its mark here in the form of important demonstrations, executions but also weddings, tournaments and political meetings.
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Place de Jaude
Place de Jaude in its 21st century incarnation offers passing strollers a subtle blend made of rising jet fountains, magnolias, tulip trees and selected minerals.
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Jelenia Gora Town Hall
In the central point of the market square there is a building of the town hall. The entire square is surrounded by Baroque tenement houses with arcades, which originally used to serve the merchants to sell their goods. The tenement houses near the market place were settled by the richest citizens – traders, craftsmen, and stallholders – this was evidenced by rich ornaments of the buildings; these were removed in 1960s during a reconstruction of the façades. The arcades were full of drapers’ and furriers’ stalls, bread benches and shambles.
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The Central Market Hall
Limoges's central market hall was built between 1885 and 1889. It is a remarkable example of 19th century architecture. The metal framework's triangular shapes each weigh 14 tonnes. It was designed by two engineers, who studied the Eiffel technique: Levesque (who spent a long time working with the manager of the Eiffel-Seyrig studies) and Pesce.
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Masarykovo Square
Exiting Břežanova Street, we find ourselves on the western side of Masarykovo Square, just across from the castle gate with the Rožmberk coat-of arms. The rectangular shape of this small square comes from its former function as a marketplace, and the burgher houses were gradually built around it. The square is lined on each side with thirteen burgher houses built on extended Gothic sites with typical Renaissance and Baroque gables. On the right hand are two buildings (no. 106 and 107) that belong to the Zlatá Hvězda Hotel. They are connected with three illusive neo-Baroque gables which give the impression of three adjacent buildings instead of two. House no. 107 has a renovated original arcade and decorated semicircular and cross vaults.
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The Bazar
he Bazar building was erected in the years 1838-42 on the initiative of Karol Marcinkowski who contributed to the establishment of the Bazar Poznański joint stock company. The Neoclassical edifice faced Nowa Street (now I. Paderewskiego Street) which was marked out at the same time and the project was supervised by a local builder Antoni Krzyżanowski (following a design by Ernest Steudener).
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Rynek of Wroclaw
Rynek of Wrocław has 3.8ha of surface and belongs to the biggest market places in Poland (the bigger ones are in Kraków and Olecko). However, the Late Gothic Town Hall with its 66m tower is the biggest building of this kind in Poland.
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Fish Market
The picturesque Fish Market in Bergen is one of Norway's most visited outdoors markets. The Fish Market sells seafood, fruit and vegetables
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The Saint Pierre District
Tourists who come to Bordeaux generally marvel at the beautiful buildings lining the quays before seeing anything else. However, many of them are unaware that the historic heart of Bordeaux is located behind the 18th century Place de la Bourse.