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Historical Sites in Venice

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The Dogi Palace
The Dogi Palace represent the symbol and the hart of the political and administrative life of the Venetian Republic millenary history. In the halls of the palace the Doge and the council took all the decision about Venice and its life.
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St. Mark Bell Tower
St. Mark’ s Bell Tower is certainly one of the symbols of Venice, nicknamed “El Paron de Casa” (The Master of the House) . It is the highest building of the city, from the top of its 98.50 meters is possible to enjoy a 360° view of the city, a must if you're visiting Venice!!!
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The Praglia Abbey
As the abbey of Santa Giustina, to which was added in the fifteenth century, the Praglia Abbey has enjoyed various events. Founded in the eleventh century, it was built in fief by Emperor Frederick II in the thirteenth century. Subsequently independent, then in, and finally added to Santa Giustina until 1810 when Napoleon suppressed.
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Basilica Palladiana
The magnificent bigger-than-life Basilica Palladiana is not a church at all and was only partially designed by Palladio. Beneath it stood a Gothic-style Palazzo della Ragione (Law Courts and Assembly Hall) that Palladio was commissioned to convert to a High Renaissance style befitting a flourishing late- 16th-century city under Venice’s benevolent patronage.
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The Old Town
The Old Town is where life started on what used to be an island secured by medieval walls. The city had seven gates, three of which have been preserved to this day: The Gate of St. Benedict, The Portica and The Gate of the Holy Cross. The first archeological traces of life date back to the Bronze Age, and the old city started developing in the 3rd century. The limited space conditioned the construction of narrow houses, narrow streets and small squares. It's an unique place to visit. The town clock and a small fountain are located on the main town square. The town clock once represented the tower on the south corner of the former town walls. Built in the 12th century, the tower was extended several times. The town clock with its Venetian lion, the symbol of Serenissima dating back to mid-19th century, was situated on the town gate fort near the Califfi Palace.
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Church of St.Thomas Rovinj
St. Thomas church is situated 4 kilometres north of Rovinj, next to the old railway line that led from Rovinj to a small place Kanfanar. This edifice has a cross ground plan lately completed by a church tower placed on its north side. There is a six metres high apse, semicircular on the inside part and polygonal on the outside part. Lateral windows are enriched by semi-circular apses as well, although being constructed of smaller size. These apses are connected with the central nave by a high semi-circular passage. In the north part of the church, the original paving was discovered along with the preserved stand of shrine partition with several niches for pilasters. Above the central part, the remains of arches that upheld the retracted construction high above the roofing are still visible. A radical constructional intervention was undertaken on the church in the 16th century, changing completely its original form. Since the lateral arches were walled in the whole edifice got one nave. The west part of the edifice was significantly shortened and altered by a new forepart with two square windows.
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Geological Park Fantazija Monfiorenzo
Near the road Rovinj-pula, about 2 kilometres far from the centre of the City of Rovinj, in the locality of Monfiorenzo, is situated the quarry phantasy, a geological park of remarkable beauty and importance. According to the expert opinion of numerous scientists, it is one of the most significant natural monuments in the world in the perspective of the karst phenomenon. The lime-stone of the quarry phantasy, like the open book pages, illustrate the history of the evolution of the terrestrial crust. Various layers give evidence of the existence of the fossilized meadows consisting of sea-weeds, which, blended with lime-stone silt, were drifted on the shore by strong currents during the last 130 million years. The quarry phantasy will reveal to a more careful visitor a considerably big number of furrows made of black and white dolomiti layers. Furthermore, there are fissures formed by tightening and exsiccation of the silt that had been squeezed into the previously created sediment. The lower part of these stony layers was formed below the sea level, while the upper part is the result of the high-tide.
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Monkodonja
The fort of Monkodonja is located about 5 km south-east of Rovinj, and was discovered in 1953 when the first excavations were carried out. Since 1997, detailed research and a partial architectural reconstruction of the site is being conducted. The town, surrounded by walls, built with blocks of stone with the dry technique is located on a hill and its side terraces that are created with stones quarried and crushed from the hill to give space to the village. The casteliere was inhabited in the period from 2000 until 1200 BC.
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Villa Serego - Alighieri
The oldest part of the villa dates back to 1353, the year in which Pietro, son of the poet Dante Alighieri, established himself in Gargagnago.
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Buonconsiglio Castle
The Buonconsiglio Castle is the largest and most important monumental complex of the Trentino Alto Adige region. It was the residence of the prince-bishops of Trento from the 13th century to the end of the 18th century, and is composed of a series of buildings of different eras, enclosed by walls and positioned slightly higher than the city. Castelvecchio is the oldest nucleus, dominated by an imposing cylindrical tower; the Magno Palazzo is the 16th century expansion in the Italian Renaissance-style as commissioned by the Prince-Bishop and Cardinal Bernardo Cles (1485-1539); the Baroque-style Giunta Albertiana dates from the end of the 17th century. At the extreme south of the complex is the Torre Aquila, within which is conserved the famous Cycle of the Months, one of the most fascinating secular pictorial cycles of the late Middle Ages. Also of exceptional interest are the extensive cycle of frescoes commissioned by the bishops to decorate the interior walls of the Castle, mainly in the late Middle Ages to the Renaissance period.
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Tridentine Diocesan Museum
The home of the Tridentine Diocesan Museum is the Pretorio Palace, first Episcopal residence of the town, in the heart of Trento. The museum was founded in 1903, also the Early Christian St. Vigil Basilica and the exhibition in the Libera Palace in the district of Villa Lagarina belong to it. In the halls of the museum the artistic and cultural treasures (from the 11th - 19th century) can be admired, all of them come from the churches of the Trentino: paintings, wooden sculptures, winged altars, pictorial manuscripts, valuable specimens of goldsmith’s work, ancient art embroideries and Flemish tapestries. The museum also houses the treasury of the cathedral with the large processional casket of St. Vigil. The multimedia station shows the most important stages of the building of the cathedral in three-d. At one passage in the museum a gorgeous view on the near located cathedral can be enjoyed and the archaeological zone of Porta Veronesis can be visited. The museum is also responsible for the near located Early Christian Basilica of St. Vigil.
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Dvigrad Ruins
Only a few kilometres west of Kanfanar, the remains of the mediaeval town of Dvigrad are located, which still dominates the Lim Fjord. During Illyrian times, two colonies existed which later, in early mediaeval times, became two towns, Parentino and Moncastello. The former quickly became extinct, whereas the latter, in the ownership of the Aquileian patriarch, developed further under the name of Duecastelli. Lateron, like the most part of the Istrian coast, Dvigrad fell under Venetian power. In the mid 17th century malaria and the plague were rifing in Istria, which didn't spare the citizens of Dvigrad either. Thus, in 1631 most of the 700 hundred inhabitants left the town, and the remaining three families left in 1714 when the church of St.Sophia was abandoned as well. The relics and the pulpit from the 14th century were transferred into the church of St. Silvester in Kanfanara, where the inhabitants of Dvigrad had moved as well. The town is very well maintained since it hadn't been destroyed in the wars that were ravaging through Istria, but rather because it was abandoned by the inhabitants of the town. The town gates still exist, as well as two circles of the town walls, some of the defence towers are maintained, as well as the most part of the 200 houses. The St. Sophia Church was an early Christian church with three naves which dominated the town and which was built on solid rock. Unfortunately, because the church wasn't being maintained, it decayed in the 19th century.
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The Pinacoteca Art Gallery
The Pinacoteca is located not far from The Due Torri (the Two Towers, symbols of Bologna), inside the former St. Ignatius Jesuit Novitiate, built in the second half of the 15th century house young men who were to join the Society of Jesus (Jesuit Order). Besides the Pinacoteca, the building is also the headquarters of the Accademia delle Belle Arti (Figurative Arts Academy) as well as the Historical Artistic and Ethno-anthropological Heritage Authority
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Roman Theater Pula
On the northeastern slopes of the central hill of the city, below the Castle are the remains of a Roman theater: in addition to the Amphitheater, Pula had two other theaters during the Roman period. The larger one, which has not been preserved, was situated outside the city, on the slopes of Zaro hill (Monte Zaro), south of the city walls. The other theater known as the Small Roman Theater was situated within the city walls. The remains of scene, semicircular orchestra and tired section for the audience have partly been reconstructed. Below the theater is the building of the one-time German Royal Gymnasium, which in 1930 became the Archaeological Museum of Istria. Today the museum displays a rich collection of prehistoric, classical and early medieval monuments found in Istria.
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Archaeological Museum of Istria
By collecting stone monuments in the Temple of Augustus in 1802, marshal Marmont began the founding of the museum collection in Pula. However, the discovery of stone, ceramic and metal objects in Nesactium was the basis for founding the Museo Civico (City Museum) in Pula in 1902. After the seat of the “Società istriana di archeologia e storia patria” had been moved and with the transfer of the archaeological inventory from Poreč to Pula, the Museo Civico was integrated with the National collection (stone monuments) and the Poreč Regional Museum (Museo Provinciale) into one regional institution. Therefore, in 1925 the Museum of Istria (Il Regio Museo dell’Istria) was founded in the present-day museum building. In 1930 the museum opened its doors to visitors, and a guidebook in Italian was published. This exhibition, along with minor changes, was open for the public until the end of World War II, when many objects were transferred to Italy during the Anglo-American administration.
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Arena Amphitheater
The most famous and important monument, the starting and ending point of every sightseeing tour is the Amphitheater, popularly called the Arena of Pula, which was once the site of gladiator fights. It was built in the 1st century AD during the reign of Emperor Vespasian, at the same time as the magnificent Colosseum in Rome. The ground plan is elliptical, the longer axis measuring about 130 m and the shorter one about 100 m. Gladiator fights took place in the central flat area called the arena, while the spectators could sit on the stone tiers or stand in the gallery. It is believed that the Amphitheater could seat about 20,000 spectators. Local limestone was used for its construction. In the Middle Ages, it was the site of knights tournaments and fairs. Today, it is the venue for many different events – Pula Film Festival, various concerts, opera, ballet, sports competitions… since its capacity is about 5000 spectators.
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Gate of Hercules
It stands between two, most probably medieval towers, of simple construction built of uncarved stone blocks. At the top of the damaged arch, although hardly recognizable, is a carving of the head of Hercules and his club. Close to the club is a damaged inscription, most interesting in the historical context since it contains the names of two Roman officials, Lucius Calpurnius Piso and Gaius Cassius Longinus to whom the Roman Senate had entrusted the duty to found a Roman colony at the site of today’s Pula. Thus, between 47 and 44 BC Pula was founded as a settlement with urban features. Since the upper circular street passed though this gate, the axis of communication was obliquely placed with respect to the direction of the city walls.
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Arch of the Sergii
The “Golden Gate” was erected between the years 29 and 27 BC by the Sergi family, in honor of three members of the family who held important positions in Pula at that time. This triumphal arch leaned against the city gate Porta Aurea thus called because of its richly ornamented arch or gilded elements. The gate and wall were pulled down in the beginning of the 19th century as a result of the city expansion outside the city walls. The Arch was constructed in Corinthian style with strong Hellenistic and Asia Minor influences both in the method and ornaments. As the eastern side was not visible it has remained for the most part uncarved, while the western, town side is richly decorated. Today numerous cultural performances, theatrical and musical, are held on the square next to the Arch. The adjacent street is a shopping area.
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Rocca and Ugo da Como house-museum
The town of Lonato boasts an exceptional monumental complex. Even the most demanding tourists will find it worth visiting.
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The Tiberius Bridge
il Ponte di Tiberio, was started during the reign of Augustus, as part of his extensive series of public works for Rimini, but takes its name from Tiberius, the Emporor under whose reign the bridge was finished. Built in seven years, between 14 and 21.AD.
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Domus Del Chirurgo
In the heart of the modern city of Rimini you’ll find some of the best preserved domestic mosaics from the roman world – the so-called ‘Surgeon’s House’ (Domus Del Chirurgo).
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Croatian Walk of Fame
The Croatian Walk of Fame project in Opatija was launched in 2005 by the Apriori Communications agency as a symbolic tribute to all the people whose sporting, scientific, cultural or artistic endeavours have contributed significantly to the worldwide promotion of Croatia. Potential candidates for inclusion are nominated by the project's independent Nomination Board consisting of several noted public individuals. From the board's nominations, readers of the media sponsors then cast their vote to decide which two candidates (one living, one awarded posthumously) should have their stars included in the Croatian Walk of Fame.
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Principia at Tarsatica
The Old Gate or the Roman Arch is not, as was assumed earlier, a Roman triumphal arch, but a monumental main entrance into the heart of the military headquarters of the late Roman empire Tarsatica, an ancient town on whose ruins medieval Rijeka rose. The people of Rijeka were right to trust their instincts and call it simply The Gate; the term Roman Arch became gradually more accepted from the time of Classicism when the documentation and the research of this monument began. The profiled facade of the Arch has been preserved only in fragments, the other parts fell off a long time ago or have been taken away to be incorporated into the houses of medieval Rijeka. The Tarsatica Principia was the main camp, the supply base and the starting point of the Claustra Alpia Iuliarum, dozens of kilometres long intermittent defence walls, towers, guard stations, and larger fortifications positioned in key communication lines and elevated points, with the aim of stopping barbaric invasions towards Italy, the heart of the Roman Empire.
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Rijeka Tunnel
How many times have you visited a military facility as a tourist? Not very often is our guess. Well, Rijeka offers a rare opportunity to do exactly that. And it will lead you underground in the process. The first military tunnel opened exclusively for tourist visits is waiting for you in the very centre of the city. The decision to build the tunnel arose from the fact that the city sprung up at the crossroads of several historical states, which is why it also became an area of particular military significance. The frequent shifting of borders led to the construction of fortifications. Most of them were built in the years leading up to World War II, during the construction of the so-called Alpine Wall (Vallo Alpino), which was supposed to protect the border between the Kingdom of Italy and the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The construction of subterranean strongholds, military warehouses, passages and bunkers began in 1931 in order to make the city less susceptible to cannon fire. The entrance to the tunnel is located next to the Cathedral of St. Vitus and it stretches below the Old Town to the Dolac Primary School. The 330-m long tunnel, which was dug into bedrock from 1939 to 1942 by the Italian military in order to protect civilians from aerial bombings, descends to a depth of 10 m in several places. It is 4 m wide and 2.5 m high on average. The main tunnel bore branches off in two directions, one leading towards the old city hall building and the other to the Cathedral of St. Vitus.
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The Trsat Castle
The Trsat Castle represents a strategically embossed lookout on a hill 138 meters above sea level dominating Rijeka. It was mentioned as a parochial centre for the first time in 1288. At this same site there was a Liburnian observation post from prehistoric times, used for monitoring the roads leading from the hinterland to the coast.
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Pilotta palace
The vast but unfinished complex, named after the game pelota that was played in one of the courtyards, was built in the second half of the 16th century at the order of Ranuccio I around the Visconti stronghold and alongside the existing church of San Pietro martire.
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Padernello castle
This imposing residential castle was built between the 15th and 16th centuries by the noble Martinengo family.
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Val dArda is Castell Arquato
Among the treasures of Val d’Arda is Castell’Arquato with a rich historical centre towered over by the Praetorian Palace and by the Fortress of the XIV century stands out.
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Fortress of Castell
A great number of medieval castles overlook the valleys and countryside creating very suggestive landscapes such as the Fortress of Castell’Arquato.
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Piazza della Signoria
The Piazza della Signoria has been the center of political life in Florence since the 14th century with the prominent Palazzo Vecchio overlooking the square. It was the scene of great triumphs, such as the return of the Medici in 1530 as well as the Bonfire of the Vanities instigated by Savonarola, who was then himself burned at the stake here in 1498 after he was denounced by the Inquisition as a heretic. A marble circle inscription on the piazza shows the location where he was burned. The sculptures in Piazza della Signoria bristle with political connotations, many of which are fiercely contradictory. The David (the original is in the Galleria dell'Accademia) by Michelangelo was placed outside the Palazzo Vecchio as a symbol of the Republic's defiance of the tyrannical Medici.
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The Palazzo Vecchio Museum & Tower
Palazzo Vecchio offers Roman ruins, a Medieval fortress and amazing Renaissance chambers and paintings. A microcosm where art and history have been indissolubly bound for centuries. Palazzo Vecchio is the main symbol of civil power for the city of Florence, whose original project is attributed to Arnolfo di Cambio. Construction on the solid fortress began in 1299 above the ruins of the destroyed Uberti Ghibelline towers, testimony of the final victory of the Guelph faction. The entire construction also rests on top of the ancient theater of the Roman colony of Florentia (dating back to the first century A.D.), whose ruins can be admired in the underground level. This area can be visited with a separate ticket or a combination ticket which includes the Palazzo Vecchio Museum and the Archaeological site. The area is suggestive organized with information and an interesting film to help you understand exactly what you are looking at underground.
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Klagenfurt Cathedral & Cathedral Square
Commissioned by the territorial estates as a Protestant church in 1578, it was designed by architect Christoph Windisch. Klagenfurt Cathedral is the oldest pilaster church in Austria. The 23 paintings on the walls and ceilings were painted over several times in the course of the years. The Catholic Reformation Commission closed the cathedral in the year 1600. Four years later it was handed over to the Jesuits who managed the Jesuit school next door until the order was closed in 1773. A fire destroyed major parts of the church in the year 1723. Reconstruction did not begin until 1725. The Carinthian Baroque painter Josef Ferdinand Fromiller created the John of Nepomuk apotheosis. The church was raised to Cathedral status in 1787. The Cathedral was renovated in the 1890s and shines today in the lustrous Baroque colourfulness of the 18th century.
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Ambras Castle Innsbruck
Ambras Castle Innsbruck is one of the main attractions in Innsbruck, the capital of the Alps. Its cultural and historic significance is inseparable from the personality of Archduke Ferdinand II (1529-1595), who promoted the arts and sciences as a true Renaissance prince. He established the magnificent Ambras collections and had a museum facility built in the lower castle to house them, designed according to modern criteria from the time. The exhibition attempts to reconstruct the Archduke’s chamber of art & curiosities, his armoury, his collection of armour from famous heroes and his collection of antiquities. In Ferdinand’s time, the living quarters were located in the upper castle. Today, the upper castle is home to the Habsburg Portrait Gallery, which features portraits from Albert III (1349-1395) to Emperor Francis I (1768-1835) over three storeys. The collection contains over 200 portraits, including valuable works by famous artists, such as Lukas Cranach, Anton Mor, Tizian, van Dyck and Diego Velásquez. The ground floor of the upper castle houses a collection of late medieval sculptures and the centrepiece is the St George’s altar that belonged to Emperor Maximilian I.
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City Tower
Look out over the rooftops of Innsbruck as the tower guards once did in the Middle Ages. Guards kept watch from the City Tower for almost 450 years, warning citizens of fire and other dangers. The lower storeys also once served as a prison. Today, the tower is there for visitors to enjoy. Over 133 steps lead up to the 31-metre-high viewing platform, which overlooks the medieval streets of Innsbruck and offers stunning views of Bergisel, Patscherkofel mountain, the River Inn and the Nordkette mountain range. The City Tower is a good 50 years older than the Golden Roof. It was completed in 1450 on the side of the old town hall. It doesn’t seem huge in comparison with modern buildings but 51 metres was very impressive in 1450 and the tower was a proud symbol of the self-confidence of the people of Innsbruck. The onion dome was added 100 years after its completion. Today, the tower still rises up majestically from amongst the medieval buildings in the old town – providing a good vantage point and a romantic view of Innsbruck.
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Golden Roof
Innsbruck's most famous landmark shines in the heart of the historic old town. The splendid alcove balcony gets its name from the 2,657 fire-gilded copper tiles that adorn the roof. The building has reigned over medieval houses and shady arcades for over 500 years. It was built by Emperor Maximilian who very much enjoyed the view: from there he would look down over the colourful hustle and bustle of his city, watch jousting tournaments and be revered from below. The shining golden roof can be seen on entering the historic old town but it is also well worth taking a look up close. The structure below the roof is richly adorned with a wide variety of figures and images, including many curiosities. An exposed backside sticks prominently out from the Golden Roof. Admittedly, it is only a few centimetres in size and it belongs to one of the many figures set below the roof. Why bare facts? This question remains unanswered and is one of the many mysteries that surround the landmark. Maybe the revenge of medieval craftsmen who weren't paid? We can only speculate. The front of the structure is decorated with a man and two wives: Emperor Maximilian is portrayed next to his wife of the time Bianca Maria Sforza. He didn't like her much, however, and that is why his first wife – Maria von Burgund – also looks out from the relief. Another eye-catcher: Small men with twisted limbs. They are morisco dancers, who were effectively the breakdancers of the Middle Ages. The Golden Roof is a must-see for anyone visiting Innsbruck. Come to the historic old town and see for yourself. You can't miss it. In the adjoining museum, you can immerse yourself in the time of Emperor Maximilian.
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