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Historical Sites in San Francisco

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United States
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Alcatraz Island
Alcatraz reveals stories of American incarceration, justice, and our common humanity. This small island was once a fort, a military prison, and a maximum security federal penitentiary. In 1969, the Indians of All Tribes occupied Alcatraz for 19 months in the name of freedom and Native American civil rights. We invite you to explore Alcatraz's complex history and natural beauty. In 1969, a group of Native American activists calling themselves the Indians of All Tribes arrived on Alcatraz Island. They spoke out against the U.S. Government's Termination Policy and the broader plight of Native Americans. Golden Gate National Recreation Area commemorates this moment in history, with 19 months of special events and an exhibition: Red Power on Alcatraz, Perspectives 50 Years Later.
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Modesto Arch
The Modesto Arch, built in 1912, was inspired by the Modesto Business Men's Association as an Ornamental and Electric Arch across I Street
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Hollywood Walk of Fame
The world’s most famous sidewalk boasts 2,500 stars and counting! When you’re in Tinseltown, posing with a sidewalk star along the Hollywood Walk of Fame is practically a rite of passage—and it’s also one of the city’s most beloved free attractions. Honoring luminaries in motion pictures, television, radio, live theatre, and recording since 1960, the famous sidewalk includes both sides of Hollywood Boulevard from Gower to La Brea, plus both sides of Vine Street from Yucca to Sunset. The handsome terrazzo-and-brass stars (each costs about $30,000 to install and maintain) are unveiled at free public ceremonies, which are often attended by honorees and their celebrity entourages—a great way to see stars if that’s one of your Hollywood goals (and isn’t it everyone’s?). And don’t think this is about honoring has-beens or where-are-they-nows: Getting a star is still considered an honor, with an impressive roster of recent honorees (Javier Bardem, Viola Davis, James Franco, Kevin Spacey, to name a few). Want to find a particular star? Use the Walk of Fame’s online Star Search tool to send you to the location for your dream photo op.
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The Dr. Willella Howe-Waffle House and Medical Museum
The House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, as a California Historic Point of Interest, and as a landmark building on the City of Santa Ana's Historic Register.
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Temple Square
Experience the peace and tranquility of beautiful Temple Square with a complimentary tour of Utah’s most visited attraction. Tours of the beautifully landscaped 10-acre property are available in 40 languages. Reflect on the majesty and wonder of God's creations as you stand beneath the star-studded dome in the rotunda of the North Visitors' Center and ponder the invitation of the outstretched arms of Thorvaldsen's Christus, a magnificent 11-foot statue of the Savior.
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Canada Place
Located in the heart of Vancouver’s downtown harbourfront, Canada Place is an iconic national landmark welcoming local residents, visitors and ships to the West Coast. Canada Place is a multi-use facility that includes FlyOver Canada, Vancouver Convention Centre East, Pan Pacific Hotel, Port Metro Vancouver cruise ship terminal, World Trade Centre office tower and VINCI Park parkade. Canada Place hosts Canada Day at Canada Place, the largest Canada Day celebration outside of Ottawa, and well as a number of other community events including National Aboriginal Day, the Canada Place Summer Series and Christmas at Canada Place.
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Buffalo Bill Museum & Grave
Buffalo Bill Cody remains the ultimate Old West icon. One of his final wishes was to be buried on Lookout Mountain above Denver, and his grave site at Lookout Mountain Park is free to visit. As part of the Denver Mountain Parks system, the park offers an engaging museum dedicated to the life and times of Buffalo Bill and his internationally known Wild West show, a curio shop and café located in the historic log Pahaska Tepee building, short walking and hiking trails, a picnic area featuring one of the oldest mountain rustic picnic shelters in the Denver Mountain Parks system, and sweeping vistas from mountain to plain. While you’re there, look for Sitting Bull’s eagle feather headdress in the museum, have a buffalo burger at the café, and enjoy a rustic mountain experience only 12 miles from Denver.
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Government House Saskatchewan
Government House was built in 1891 and served as the official residence and office of the Lieutenant (pronounced “left-tenant”) Governor until 1945. The Lieutenant Governor is the Queen’s representative for Saskatchewan. In 1945, Government House was leased to the Department of Veterans Affairs as a convalescent home until 1957. In 1958-1977, the house was used as a centre for adult education and became known as Saskatchewan House. Restoration on Government House started in 1978 and it opened as a museum in 1980. The Office of the Lieutenant Governor did not return to the house until 1984 and currently occupies the north wing of the house. Today, Government House is restored to the time period of 1898-1910, during the tenure of Lieutenant Governor Amédée Forget. It has an Interpretive Centre and beautiful Edwardian Gardens.
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Wanuskewin Heritage Park
Wanuskewin Heritage Park sits above Opimihaw Creek and the South Saskatchewan River near Saskatoon – a window into a part of Canada’s history that remains largely undiscovered, and a link to our past unlike any other National Historic Site in Canada. Wanuskewin’s uniqueness is not just the fact that there exists evidence of ancient peoples, but rather the composition of many different aspects of habitation, hunting and gathering, and spirituality – all in one place. The Wanuskewin area contains some of the most exciting archaeological finds in North America, many of which predate the pyramids of Egypt. To date, 19 Pre-Contact archaeological dig sites have been identified on the terraces and point bars in the Opimihaw Creek valley bottom or coulee depressions along the valley wall of the South Saskatchewan River. As soon as the Opimihaw Creek valley became available for human occupation 6,000 years ago, virtually every Pre-Contact cultural group recognized across the Great Plains visited this location.
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Batoche National Historic Site
All aboard! Ride the visitor shuttle and discover a NEW side of Batoche. Hop on and off or Journey Through Time on an interactive and fun tour. Re-live the last battle of the Métis resistance in 1885, led by Louis Riel and Gabriel Dumont against the government troops of General Middleton’s men at Batoche. The bullet holes in the rectory wall and gravestones in the cemetery tell an eloquent tale. Join staff in authentic costume sharing further stories of Métis life beside the banks of the South Saskatchewan River. Ready, set, fun with family and friends! Choose from competitive, recreational or kids adventure relay, which includes canoeing, horseback riding, pack running, biking and running. Costumes welcome! Don’t miss the popular Saskatoon berry pie eating contest, line up for archery practice and try canoeing. Kids activities, pavilions, live music, bannock tasting and food vendors round out the festivities. Register your team early for the Louis Riel Relay. New unique twists on a classic Saskatoon event that you won't want to miss! Louis Riel Relay and Kidfest is brought to you in collaboration with the Friends of Batoche. Canoeing and Kayaking : Hear the gentle slosh of the water as you dip your paddle into the cool South Saskatchewan River. Your canoe or kayak glides along as you look up at the lush, green river valley walls stretching towards the sky. With an area so full of history and beauty how can you not be intrigued? Do not have a canoe or kayak? No problem! We have eight canoes and two kayaks available to rent on a first come first serve basis. Want to book ahead to be sure you will have one for your visit? You can reserve a canoe or kayak with a credit card. Contact us for details, reservations are recommended.
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Old Cowtown Museum
Experience Wichita like it’s 1865. Old Cowtown is a living history museum that lets you immerse yourself in the sights, sounds and activities common to a Midwestern cattle town.
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Durham Museum
Beautiful architecture blends with memories of a time gone by at The Durham Museum. Making its home in one of Omaha’s most unique treasures, Union Station, The Durham Museum offers a fascinating look at the history of our region and offers a broad-range of traveling exhibits covering subjects ranging from history and culture, to science, industry and more through our affiliation with the Smithsonian Institution and strong ties with the Library of Congress, National Archives and the Field Museum.
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The Forks National Historic Site
Saturated in 6,000 years of history, the meeting of the Red and Assiniboine rivers has always been a gathering place for people. Across 54 beautiful acres you’ll find a bustling central market, exceptional dining and accommodations, vast tree-lined paths overlooking all the bends in the riverbank, a world-class skate park, a children’s play area and water park, and all the best things a Winnipeg winter has to offer like skate rentals and access to one of the world’s longest skating trails. It also bridges, via the sexy Esplanade Riel, très-European St. Boniface — with its restaurants, cafes, artistic flair and francophone flavour — and the downtown core.
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Alexander Majors House Museum
The Alexander Majors House is one only four surviving antebellum houses in Kansas City, Missouri, and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in 1856 for the family of Alexander Majors, the house served as both a family home and as the headquarters for Majors’ successful freighting company. The Majors House was built facing westward, overlooking what was then the Kansas Territory. Originally, the Majors House had nine rooms and nine fireplaces—one in each room. It boasts original floors of virgin white pine—non-existent today. The walls were originally plastered with white lime and hog-hair. The house’s main rooms consisted of an office, parlor, and dining room on the first floor, and three bedrooms and a family parlor on the second floor. Before the rear additions were constructed in the early 1900s, the Majors family’s kitchen was a detached outbuilding or lean-to.
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Jesse James Birthplace Museum
The Jesse James Birthplace Museum contains the largest collection of James family artifacts in the world. Tour the home where Jesse was born and raised alongside his also-infamous brother Frank. Jesse’s grave site at Kearney’s Mount Olivet Cemetery draws thousands of visitors each year, as does the Jesse James Festival, which takes place each September.
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Loring Park
Surrounding the Convention Center on the southern edge of downtown Minneapolis, the Loring Park District is a walkable residential neighborhood of historic institutions and cultural attractions.
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Mill City Museum
Built into the ruins of what was once the world’s largest flour mill, Mill City Museum is located on the historic Mississippi Riverfront. Here, visitors of all ages learn about the intertwined histories of the flour industry, the river, and the city of Minneapolis.
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Fort Vancouver
Once home to both fur traders and fighter pilots, Fort Vancouver offers an authentic look at life in the Pacific Northwest through the past 200 years. Located just across the Columbia River from Portland in Vancouver, Wash., the region’s only national historic site is centered around a complete replica of Fort Vancouver, the fur-trading camp founded by the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1825.
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Louisiana Governor's Mansion
Built in 1963 when Jimmy Davis was Governor of Louisiana, the Mansion is located on Capitol Lake near the State Capitol. Because so many antebellum mansions were being destroyed by fire and neglect, Gov. and Mrs. Davis instructed the architects to design a mansion in the Greek Revival style, which was the dominant style in Louisiana after 1830. This period marks a distinct departure from earlier Louisiana architecture. The Mansion contains a total of 25,000 square feet of space in three floors and a basement.
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Magnolia Mound Plantation
A 1792 French Creole plantation house authentically restored with outbuildings and gardens covering 15 acres. This landmark is a unique southern Louisiana landmark because of its age, quality of restoration, and outstanding collections. Magnolia Mound's mission is to illustrate and interpret the lifestyle of the French Creoles through educational programs, workshops, lectures, festivals, and other special events. The property includes a historic museum house, an open-hearth kitchen, overseer's house, quarter house, crop garden pigeonnier and carriage house.
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The Monumental Clock of Pachuca
*The Monumental Clock of Pachuca, created with white quarry and with similar equipment of Big Ben, the clock marks the centenary of the Independence of Mexico and was inaugurated on September 15, 1910.
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Chapultepec Castle
Chapultepec has the rather dubious distinction of being the only castle within North America to ever house actual sovereigns. It was originally constructed in 1725 on the orders of the Viceroy Bernardo de Gálvez, and was meant to be a large manor house for the Viceroy, who was the commander-in-chief of the Spanish colony, New Spain. Currently the castle is the seat of National Museum of Cultures, which was formerly known as the Museum of Natural History. It was established as such by Lázaro Cárdenas in 1939. In this capacity it is open to visitors who can come and tour both the castle itself and the various collections it now houses. Through the past decades it has become a favorite location of movie directors appearing in both Robert Aldrich’s Vera Cruz and Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo and Juliet.
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Metropolitan Cathedral
Mexico City’s mammoth cathedral was built across three centuries (1573–1813)—starting soon after Cortés and his allies vanquished the Aztec Empire—using stones taken from a destroyed indigenous temple. Today’s sanctuary serves up contrasts between unadorned neoclassical walls alongside exuberant gilt chapels and altarpieces as well as a massive pipe organ, with some baroque elements, that’s still dusted off and played from time to time. Be sure not to miss the high altar, and consider shelling out for a visit to the sacristy, with its glistening dome, grand canvases, and massive cabinets, fit to hold an archbishop’s entire stock of holy utensils. And for a queasy view of how much the ground beneath the city is sinking, note how chandeliers appear to list in comparison to the chapel’s vertical lines.
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Templo Mayor Museum
Built on an islet in the center of the lake, the city of Mexico grew up with a network of canals and artificial islands, making the Templo Mayor take place. The Spanish conquerors built he Metropolitan Cathedral on top of it, so the memory of the old and imposing pre-Hispanic Temple was lost for centuries. In the late 70s, workers from the electricity company accidentally found structures that the archaeologists identified as the sought temple. Fortunately, today you can visit a large dug up section in a good state of conservation. You can admire sections of the temples dedicated to Huitzilopochtli, the lord of war, and Tlaloc, lord of the rain. Between the walls of several sections of the temple, there are altars, snakes carved in stone and an imposing Tzompantli, which is a wall covered with representations of skulls, this because the Aztecs worshipped the dead, tradition maintained by Mexicans.
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Royal Street
For a full 13 blocks, Royal Street runs parallel to Bourbon Street, yet this thoroughfare – one of the finest stretches of art galleries, antique stores, wrought iron balconies, restaurants and architecture in the USA – is sometimes almost completely missed by visitors. This is a real shame; beyond the qualities we’ve just described, Royal Street makes a nice counterbalance to the neon and noise of Bourbon.
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Storytellers Museum
The Storytellers Museum is in a historic building that started as a general store; later, Johnny Cash converted it into his “Little Stage,” where his “Saturday Night in Hickman County” guitar pulls took place. For an unforgettable experience, come see the one-of-a-kind memorabilia and never-before-shown video footage of Johnny Cash; every visit includes a 20-minute Live Concert!
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Old Fort
Enjoy a stroll through the sights and sounds of yesteryear! Visit the Historic Fort, where history is brought to life through hands-on demonstrations and re-enactments. Period specific events ranging from the early 1700s through the Civil War Era are presented.
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Taxco
It is a small but charming “Magical Town”, just 4 hours away from Acapulco, nestled in an area surrounded by great hills and mountains, thanks to the intense exploitation of its silver deposits. Its people still live from the commerce and manufacture of objects that the precious metal alloys; the baroque constructions raised during the mining boom of the Colony are still preserved. Any terrace is good to contemplate those jewels of the past, the new and small must be sought among the cobbled streets that go up and down everywhere. In addition, Taxco has a peculiar beauty, because this magnificent Magical Town has the ability to transport us to another time and space, just to the time of colonial Mexico. Its beautiful cobblestone streets are characterized by its inclination, and almost all of them lead to beautiful little squares where it is possible to walk, visit the kiosk or sit on one of their benches.
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Sauder Village
But it’s not the buildings that make history come alive at this attraction; rather, it’s the knowledgeable staff, who explain and demonstrate the significance of each building and show what little slices of life were like around the turn of the last century. Sauder Village is, frankly, the most honest historical collection in our area. History there is not boringly preserved in a jar, locked away never to be seen; but neither is it pandering to the silliness or gags that some historical institutions have introduced to boost ticket sales. It’s not quite a journey back in time, but neither is Sauder Village quite of our time. It is, in some respects, a place where time just doesn’t apply. The institution was founded by Erie Sauder, who was also the entrepreneur behind Sauder Furniture, the nation’s largest manufacturer of ready-to-assemble furniture ? in fact, chances are probably decent that many will read this on a computer sitting on a Sauder desk. It was a way for Sauder to preserve some of the historic structures of the area, such as his first workshop, an old Lutheran church, a train station, and a working farm. Over the years, the village has grown exponentially. Now, beautiful, larger buildings house some of the most popular crafts, such as blacksmithing, pottery, and glassblowing. A lodge and conference center abuts the village and the popular Barn Restaurant. A hands-on children’s area is new this year.
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Edsel & Eleanor Ford House
Discover the private estate of one of America's most iconic automotive families. The stunning architecture, the expansive lakefront gardens and grounds, the historic cars - all give a glimpse into the Ford family's life at the estate.
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German Village
And for family, friends, and visitors, it’s also a home away from home. That’s because you don’t have to live in German Village to live here. In German Village, its mission is simple: preserve, protect and promote life among the bricks. German Village Business Community is a collection of independent businesses, sharing resources and working together to promote the historic business community of German Village. Whether you’re planning a night out on our bricks or visiting for the weekend, you’ll find what you’re looking for when you click Shop. Dine. Stroll. above.
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The Atlanta History Center
The Atlanta History Center is located in one of Atlanta’s most vibrant neighborhoods where the stories, mysteries and crusades of our region thrive. Our 33-acre experience features award-winning exhibitions, historic houses, enchanting gardens, interactive activities and a variety of year-round adult and family programs.