active-pinPinned places
active-placeAdd a New Place

Historical Sites in San Pedro de Atacama

Countries:

Chile
unpinned
Chiu Chiu
A must-see for tourists following the “Inca trail”; this is an oasis of shade in the middle of the desert. Inhabited by communities from Atacama, its easy-going pace is only interrupted by religious festivities which, depending on the patron saint, include confetti, flour or algarrobo drinks (fermented drink made from the pods and seeds of the algarrobo tree). Try the typical food of the north and don’t forget to visit the San Francisco Church, built in the 1600s. It is the oldest church in Chile and was built using millennial indigenous techniques. Go in and marvel: it is made out of mud and cactus wood.
unpinned
Tulor Village
Tulor Village was an important city circa 2800 b.C. with 200 inhabitants. Today, it´s a museum that seems to have been burried under the sand, right in the middle of the desert. The new town features houses built with mud, just like the first inhabitants used to build their homes, surrounded by walls that worked as protection. The constructions reach the 2 meters high and most of them have balconies.
Explore more places related to this search:
unpinned
Wulff Castle
Mr. Gustavo Wulff, German saltpeter and coal trader, as well as maritime transporter, migrated to Chile in 1881. In 1904, he bought from Dr. Teodoro Von Schoeders 1,260m2 in front of Cerro Castillo (Castle Hill), in Viña del Mar where he had a house built and ready in 1908.
unpinned
Machu Picchu
Machu Picchu is an Incan city surrounded by temples, terraces and water channels, built on a mountaintop. It was built with huge blocks of stone joined to each other without any mortar. Today it has been designated cultural heritage of humanity in recognition of its political, religious and administrative importance during the age of the Incas. Machu Picchu means Old Mountain, taking its name from the location of the Incan citadel. According to historians, the architectural complex was built in the 15th century, approximately, by the Inca Pachacutec. Machu Picchu was linked to the entire Inca Empire via the Qhapaq Ñan, the famous roads of the Incas. The citadel is divided into two areas: the agricultural area consisting of the terraces, and the urban section, which served administrative purposes. The average altitude of the citadel is 8047 feet above sea level. Its exact location is in the Machu Picchu district, province of Urubamba, 70 miles northeast of the city of Cusco. The mountains of Wayna Picchu and Machu Picchu are perfect for taking panoramic photos of the entire architectural complex.
unpinned
Plaza de Mayo
The Plaza de Mayo is the oldest public square in Buenos aires, and has been the scene of many of the most important events in the city's history, from the second founding of the city in 1580, through the revolution of independence, to more recent political demonstrations. The square is named after the Argentine revolution, which began on May 25, 1810. Around the square are several important buildings: the Cabildo, the Metropolitan Cathedral, where Pope Francis conducted mass for 20 years, the Casa Rosada, seat of the national government, the national revenue office (AFIP), the national bank and the intelligence secretariat.
unpinned
Casa Rosada
Dominating the Plaza de Mayo, the Casa Rosada - or pink house - is the seat of the Argentine national government and houses the president's office. Witness to much of the city's history, it was from the balconies of the Casa Rosada that Juan and “Evita” Perón addressed the masses during the late 1940s and early 1950s. The central archway was designed by Italian architect Francisco Tamburini, who was also responsible for the original design of the Colón Theatre, and was completed in 1890.
unpinned
Sao Paulo Cathedral
The history of the Cathedral of São Paulo goes back in time to 1589, when it was decided that a main church (the Matriz) would be built in the small village of São Paulo. The Cathedral is the largest church in the city of São Paulo: 111 metres long, 46 metres wide, with the two flanking towers reaching a height of 92 metres. The Cathedral is a Latin cross church with a five-aisled nave and a dome that reaches 30 metres over the crossing. Although the building in general is Neo-Gothic, the dome is inspired by the Renaissance dome of the Cathedral of Florence. The cathedral’s organ, built in 1954 by the Italian firm Balbiani & Rossi, is one of the largest in Latin America. It has five keyboards, 329 stops, 120 registers, and 12,000 pipes, the mouths of which display hand-engraved reliefs in Gothic style.
unpinned
Marco do Descobrimento
What is the Discovery Landmark? How important is this monument to our history? This is because the discovery landmark is the name given to a specific monument in Bahia, in Porto Seguro. Mainly known for being the first monument brought by the Portuguese, around 1500, in the so-called “discovery” of the country. After all, this is one of the main tourist spots for those who love history. We can define the Marco do Descobrimento as a Portuguese stone column that features an inscription, whose function is to affirm Portuguese sovereignty in the place where it is inserted. It's almost like saying: Portugal is the law and the divinity !!! The place where the Marco do Discovery stone is inserted is easily accessible to the public since it is located in the Historic Center of Porto Seguro. Being easily accessible even more because it is not necessarily inside any religious chapel present on the site. There is only one glass dome that has been placed for the preservation of the monument.
unpinned
Bolivar Square
Bolívar Square lies at the center of Manizales and is surrounded by the Cathedral Basilica of Our Lady of the Rosary and the Governor’s Palace, among other buildings. In the square you can admire Bolívar Condor, a sculpture made in tribute to Simón Bolívar made by Rodrigo Arenas Betancourt, as well as ceramic murals by local artist Guillermo Botero.
unpinned
Cruise through Panama Canal
Panama is world-famous for its 48-mile canal that connects the Pacific Ocean with the Atlantic Ocean. Each year, over a million people visit the canal and are able to witness this engineering marvel at work. Panama is very proud to have this magnificent creation operating 365 days a year, enabling the world's cargo to be shipped efficiently and safely to new destinations.
unpinned
Casco Viejo
Everyone wants the inside scoop on Casco Viejo, Panama's most charismatic neighborhood. Today, Casco Viejo (aka. Casco Antiguo, San Felipe or El Casco) is a vibrant community consisting of a sharp contrast of old and new, local and foreign. The buildings are in various stages or redevelopment and renovation, with a strictly enforced standard of Historical Authenticity. There is tremendous culture and a feeling which is unique only to this neighborhood in Panama.
unpinned
Panama Viejo
Declared World Heritage by UNESCO, it was founded in 1519. Panama was the first city built on the Pacific Ocean coast during the Spanish colonial period in America. Its geographical position turned it into a golden transit point and the fabulous treasures of the American continent were sent to Spain and, therefore, it was also a coveted booty for pirates. In 1671, the city was sacked and destroyed by the famous pirate Henry Morgan. Today is a place visited by all those who wish to relive with imagination that distant era of mythical heroes and villains.
unpinned
Castillo de San Carlos de le Barra
This is a historical castle built in the seventeenth century to protect the residents of Maracaibo from pirate attacks. It was the time when the city was attacked by pirates more often. Later, this castle was used for different purposes in different eras. In the nineteenth century, the Venezuelan army used it for military purposes. Then during Juan Vicenre Gomez’s dictatorship, it served as a prisoner for political antagonists. The government declared the Castillo de San Carlos de le Barra a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
unpinned
Forte dos Reis Magos
Ground zero of the city of Natal, the Fort was built by Portuguese settlers and provides a beautiful view of the city! Known as Fortaleza dos Reis Magos, the Barra do Rio Grande Fort was the first building of Natal, capital of the state of Rio Grande do Norte. Designed by Priest Gaspar de Samperes, the Fort began to be built by the Portuguese settlers on January 6, 1598 (Three Wise Men’s Day), hence its name. Shaped like a star, the Fortress set in motion the construction of the city and is its main historical-cultural monument. Its location by the mouth of the Potengi river was strategic in the 17th century, offering a broad view of the sea and avoiding invasions by pirates, who arrived at the coast to steal pau-brasil (native tree to the Atlantic Forest). The view is one of the most beautiful of Natal.
unpinned
Farley Hill National Park
Once the site of a beautiful mansion built by Sir Graham Briggs for the entertainment of royalty including King George V in 1879, today Farley Hill has been designated a national park by Barbadian Government. And though the mansion itself was destroyed by fire in 1965, the gutted remains still stand and provide an ideal setting for a picnic and a day of fun in the park, while offering stunning views of the island’s southern point.
unpinned
St. Nicholas Abbey
This venue is somewhat magical, tucked away in the North of Barbados is St. Nicholas Abbey! This historical plantation boasts beautiful Jacobean architecture and lush surroundings. St. Nicholas Abbey’s great house, built by Benjamin Berringer in 1658, is one of just three Jacobean style mansions remaining in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the finest historic sites in Barbados. Its 350-year history is filled with colourful tales of murder, love and intrigue; its owners have played pivotal roles in both Barbadian and American history. Located in the hills of St. Peter, St. Nicholas Abbey encompasses over 400 acres of undulating sugar cane fields, lush tropical gullies, mahogany forests and formal gardens filled with hibiscus, roses, orchids and fruit trees. The St. Nicholas Abbey Heritage Railway, completed in late 2018, is the newest family attraction at St. Nicholas Abbey Great House Plantation and Distillery. Journey through the plantation’s grounds on our beautiful steam locomotive! Also you can take a guided tour of the Great House, circa 1650 and museum, viewing of a 1930s movie of life on the plantation, and complimentary beverage. Personal tour of the Factory, Steam Mill circa 1890 and Distillery “Annabelle” with Mr. Larry Warren, Owner and Distiller.
unpinned
Ahu Tongariki
With 15 gigantic stone-carved moai lined up on a 200-foot-long platform and a remote location framed by the looming Rano Raraku volcano and the crashing ocean, Ahu Tongariki is nothing short of spectacular. For many visitors, this is the star attraction of Easter Island, and looking up at the towering figures, the largest of which stands 14 meters tall, it’s hard not to be in awe of the Rapa Nui people, who achieved the seemingly impossible feat of carving and moving the 30-ton stone boulders to their waterfront perch. Ahu Tongariki is the largest ceremonial site ever made on the island, featuring the largest number of moai ever erected on a single site, and each statue is unique, with only one featuring the iconic red-rock “pukao,” or ceremonial headdress. Even more astounding, considering the size and weight of the statues, is that the site was almost completely destroyed by a tsunami in 1960, with the rocks flung more than 90 meters inland. The ahu has since been painstakingly restored, a project that took Chilean archaeologists Claudio Cristino and Patricia Vargas five years and was finally completed in 1995. Read more about Best Ahu Tongariki Tours, Trips & Admission Tickets - Easter Island - https://www.viator.com/en-AU/Easter-Island-attractions/Ahu-Tongariki/d306-a15083?mcid=56757
unpinned
Puna Pau
Puna Pau is the quarry where the red stone for the pukao, or topknot, for the moai statues comes from. In the later period of moai statue carving, a final decoration was build for the statues - a huge red block of stone on the head of the moais. This red stone is called pukao and represents the hair of the person the statue represents. The mana - a magical power - was preserved in the hair, so more hair would potentially mean more mana. All of the moai top knots come from Puna Pau. This is because Puna Pau is the red stone quarry which has the most intense red color, giving a more intense visual appearance once on top of the moai.
unpinned
Orongo Ceremonial Village
The ceremonial village of Orongo is one of the most interesting and spectacular archaeological sites on Easter Island. Here an ancient ritual that still inspires the competitions of the Tapati Rapa Nui festival took place. The village of Orongo was inhabited seasonally by the chiefs and main characters of the ancient tribes, who hoped to collect the first sacred egg of the manutara bird in the months of spring. It is believed that the first Orongo constructions were not related to the manutara cult. In fact, just before the start of the village, on the edge that looks at the lagoon, there are the remains of a small ahu or platform. Only the base at ground level of a single moai is conserved, which according to some hypothesis could be the famous Hoa Hakananai’a moai. In front of the ahu some holes in the stones can be seen, which could have been used as an astronomical observatory to determine the position of the sun.
unpinned
Pigeon Island Natonal Park
Pigeon Island National Landmark is heralded as one of the most important monuments of Saint Lucia’s history. It is a vivid representation of the cultural and historical monuments of international, civil, military and marine cross currents, characteristic of West Indian historical change. A living museum within a natural setting, Pigeon Island is being nurtured through careful protection and intelligent development to serve the intellectual, cultural and recreational needs of all who visit this historic site. The picturesque, 44 acre island reserve, off the North West, was originally surrounded by water but was joined to the mainland by a man-made causeway in 1972. Recognizing the need to secure this site where the balance of late eighteenth century naval power was decided, the Government of Saint Lucia designated Pigeon Island as a National Park in 1979 and as a National Landmark in 1992. Pigeon Island National Landmark has a number of heritage attractions and amenities which include: Ruins of military buildings used during the battles between the French and the British for the island of Saint Lucia; Two beautiful beaches; A restaurant featuring local cuisine; A pub and restaurant with a historical theme and a lookout point at the top of the Fort which gives a panoramic view of the Northwest coastline.
unpinned
Nelson's Dockyard
Fully restored to its original splendor, the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century buildings of the Dockyard house modern amenities such as shops, hotels, and marina businesses. Outside the dockyard, historic forts dot the landscape of the park accessible by hiking trails which allow visitors to enjoy the park's scenic and natural beauty.
unpinned
Martello Tower
The Martello Tower is situated on the south coast of Barbuda. It was built in the early 1800s as a defence base for the British, to stand guard over the river landing, the island’s original quay. Its name was derived from a tower Cape Martella in Corsica, that the British had difficulty in taking in 1974. The current fort was erected on the site of a preexisting fort, presumed to have been built by the Spanish, dating back to 1745. The 32-foot tall tower commands great views over most of the island. The fort, which was once armed with three guns, is placed near a small stream which only appeared in wet weather.
unpinned
Barbuda Caves
The caves and other Historical sites that runs along the sea cliff are full of History. Visitors can see several species of animals that is indigenous to Barbuda.
unpinned
Fortaleza Ozama Fortress
Visit the first military fort in the continent and discover more about the Colonial history of Santo Domingo. Erected in front of the mouth of the Ozama River, the Santo Domingo Fortress or Fortaleza Ozama Fortress is the first military construction in the Colony, and one of the World Heritage jewels in the Colonial Area. The simple and solid construction was built by the Spaniards between 1502 and 1507 at the request of the governor Nicolás de Ovando, providing it with a Medieval style. However, during the following centuries, the place was modified and extended until it became an interesting building that you can see today. The main purpose of its construction was to defend the city from the attacks of British, Portuguese and French conquerors, as well as from the pillage of pirates.
unpinned
Casa Bacardi
Casa Bacardi is one of the top attractions near San Juan. Choose from a number of fun and interesting tours. Getting there is easy from Old San Juan – just a short ferry and taxi ride.
unpinned
Old San Juan
Old San Juan, the most popular cruise destination in the Caribbean, is far from a cookie cutter vacation spot. Old San Juan is special in every way, known for it’s rich history, five century old forts, romantic ambiance, Old World elegance, exquisite food, and festive atmosphere.
unpinned
Fort Charles
The first fort to be erected in Port Royal was Fort Charles. It was built in the late 1650-60 and was originally called Fort Cromwell but was renamed Fort Charles. The fort underwent several changes between 1656 -1670. In 1667, the fort had 36 guns and by 1765 it had 104 guns and a garrison with 500 men.
unpinned
Port Royal
One of the oldest and most historic regions of the country, Port Royal has maintained much of its independence as well as its heritage. Once the enclave of pirates and other outlaws, there is still a strong seafaring tradition. Much of the old city, described in the 17th century as the "wickedest city in the west", lies underwater beside the town, the result of an earthquake that in 1692 swallowed about two-thirds of the then-living space. Since then, another earthquake in 1907, numerous hurricanes, fires, and various population-decimating diseases have plagued the town. Despite all, the waters around Port Royal are a virtual archaeological gold mine, filled with pieces of history that tell of everyday life in the earliest days of English occupation. Port Royal is also home to the Archaeological Division of the Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT), which recently completed a sonar survey of the underwater city, revealing a sunken pirate ship in the Kingston Harbour. To date thousands of artefacts have been recovered, and there are plans to develop a local museum to showcase these items once the research on them is complete.
unpinned
Liberty Hall
Liberty Hall located at 76 King Street, Kingston was the centre of activities for the Kingston division of The U.N.I.A. It was acquired in 1923 for eight hundred pounds sterling (£800). The two-storey building was the first meeting hall in Jamaica that was fully owned and operated by blacks. It was the home to plays, concerts, dances, elocution pieces, adult and children's choirs. One famous play, which took place here, was the "Slave Ship", which recaptured the horrors of the Middle Passage. Liberty Hall was so named because of Garvey's great admiration for the Irish independence movement and the Irish Transport and General Workers Union whose headquarters in Dublin was named Liberty Hall in 1912. It was at this place, described as "the fortress of the militant working class of Ireland" that many plans were made for Irish self-determination, and Garvey saw the U.N.I.A struggle as being akin to that of the Irish. Liberty Hall is decked in colours red, black and green, which are of much significance. The red denotes the blood of the Negro race nobly shed in the past and dedicated to the future; black represents the colour of the skin and green represents a promise of a better life in Africa. This monument stands as a proud reminder to all Jamaicans, and indeed to all visitors of the works and achievements of the great visionary and National Hero the Rt. Excellent Marcus Mosiah Garvey.
unpinned
Trench Town Culture Yard
The Culture Yard today hosts a small museum which presents the phenomenal history of Trench Town along with articles, instruments and furnishing used by Tata Ford, Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer. The original 1940's buildings have been restored to their former glory and the site is truly a heritage tourism destination.
unpinned
Bustamante Museum
24 Tucker Avenue is the former residence of the late Sir Alexander Bustamante. In 1940 Bustamante was held in detention at Up Park Camp for allegedly inciting workers to protest against low wages and poor working conditions. From this location he instructed his attorneys from the legal firm Judah and Randall, to build a home on the half-acre of land he had brought in 1939. Bustamante's attorneys had the house completed within a year and around the same time Bustamante was released from detention camp. The house was at first rented for a couple of years before it was occupied by Bustamante. The building is a contemporary style 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom concrete house with a combined hip and gable end and timber shingle roof finish. Louvre windows are reflected throughout the design, with the exception of the pivoted sash windows of the bathrooms. This Tucker Avenue home now has its place in Jamaica's history because a National Hero lived there and because of the eventful conferences which took place there. The house is now open to the public as the Bustamante Museum and consists of a multimedia exhibition with artifacts on display.
unpinned
Rastafari Indigenous Village
Visit with Jamaica's Rastafari people. Warm and welcoming, they are happy to share with you their values of equality, healthy living and connectedness with nature. Located just outside Montego Bay, Rastafari Indigenous Village is a living cultural center that offers you an opportunity to experience the Rastafari way of life. Whether you choose a half or full-day tour, you'll have the unique opportunity to connect with Rastafarians and learn more about their culture and values. You'll be introduced to drum makers who create traditional drums by hand, using techniques that have been passed down through generations. You can tour an organic vegetable and herb garden and learn more about why the Rastafari choose to follow a vegan diet, and what are its benefits. You can then have a meal with the Rastafari, and taste for yourself. A small store offers traditional handicrafts and jewellery. The tour concludes with a performance of traditional drumming and singing in the center of the village.
unpinned
Citadelle Laferriere
The Citadelle Laferrière is a mountaintop fortress, located on the northern coast of Haiti - on the top of mountain Bonnet a L’Eveque. Depicted on local currency, stamps and postcards, this amazing structure has become the symbol of Haiti’s power and independence. It was built at the beginning of the 19th century by one of the leaders of Haiti’s slave revolution. The Citadelle Laferrière is also known simply as the Citadelle or as Citadelle Henri Christophe in the honour of its creator. The Citadelle is referred by locals as the Eighth Wonder of the World and in 1982 it was nominated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This massive stone construction is the largest fortress in the Americas. Built to demonstrate the power of the newly independent Haiti, the Citadelle Laferrière was essential for the security of Haiti’s newly formed state.
unpinned
Sans Souci Palace
Henri Christophe is also the one who ordered the construction of this palace. Although in ruins today, its remnants explain the extent of the territory on which it was built. Two earthquakes (1842 & 1843) seriously destroyed it. This colossal monument was the personal residence of Henri Christophe and was divided into four sections including the King's apartments (Henri Christophe), left pavilion, the Queen's apartments and large stables. It even had a barracks, a hospital, a print shop and more. According to the hearsay, the style of the palace was to compete with the castle of Versailles.
unpinned
East End Lighthouse Park
The first lighthouse on Grand Cayman was erected at Gun Bluff in the early 1900s, which is approximately a half-mile from the present site of the East End Lighthouse Park. This was required under the Justices and Vestry’s East End Light Law (1906). A 60-foot ship’s mast stood on the Bluff and William James Watler was hired as a lightkeeper to ensure that a kerosene lantern was hoisted to the top of the mast at 6:00pm every evening and lowered at 6:00am every morning. A fine “not exceeding forty shillings” was to be imposed on him if it was discovered that he had been lax in his duties. The light could be seen 10 miles out to sea. The lighthouse at Gorling Bluff served until 1937, when the British Government gave order for five modern “navigational lights” to be erected around the coasts of all three Cayman Islands. The lights were to be placed on Crown Property, however, so that same year the Crown acquired Gorling Bluff. The replacement lighthouse was constructed by Mr. Morell from England, and it is this light which serves to the present day, though it is now solar-powered. Part of the wooden frame of the previous lighthouse remains, but the old kerosene lamp is now in the Cayman Islands National Museum.
close

My Pinned Locations

Create a new collection

Unnamed Collection

(rename)

Places
Cities
You don't have any pinned places yet Just click on the blue icon pin to pin it