active-pinPinned places
active-place

Historical Sites in Marrakesh

Countries:

Morocco
unpinned
El Bahia Palace
“Bahia”: literally, the marvellous, the brilliant, this name probably refers to the favourite wife of Ba ahmed, the grand vizier who had the palace built. The plans were designed by the Marrakchi architect si Mohamed el Mekki el Mesfioui, like a real labyrinth reflecting the whims of a powerful man. The best Moroccan and andalousian craftsmen worked on this palace for fourteen years. The tiles were imported from Tetouan, the marble from Meknes while the cedar wood used for the painted and shimmering ceilings came from the atlas.
unpinned
El Badi Palace
Dar el Badii, the unrivalled palace was built between 1578 and 1603 by Yacoub el Mansour, an almohade ruler. The richest raw materials, some of which came from india were chosen for its construction: gold, onyx, italian marble…The andalusian influence in the plans of the palace is undeniable and one may think that the unknown architect must have come from granada. an almost absolute symetry was imposed in the plan of this magnificent residence completely built on arches with extremely solid bricks. The interior gardens, called gardens of desire, of which only an immense esplanade remains today with artificial lakes and orange trees, are surrounded by the ruins of the palace and high walls on which a multitude of storks is nestled.
unpinned
The Saadian Tombs
The royal necropolis of the saadian family, a first series of funeral chambers was created after the burial of Prince Mohamed Cheikh in 1557. his son had a koubba erected, known as koubbat lalla Messaouda, where he was himself buried in1574. in 1591, ahmed el Mansour had his mother buried there. his three successors also lie there. a second edifice was raised, with a central room called the room of the twelve columns, it houses the sultan ahmed el Mansour’s grave, the mirhab room, the room with the three alcoves. another space is reserved to children’s graves. all the rooms are exquisitely decorated.
unpinned
Ben Youssef Madrasa
Right in the heart of the medina, the Ben Youssef Medersa, one of the biggest medersas in the Maghreb, is one of the most remarkable historical monuments in Marrakesh and is worth a visit. it was built in the 16th century by the saadian abd allah al ghalib, which is confirmed by the inscriptions on the lintel of the entrance gate and on the capitals of the prayer room. Created on a 1,680-sq.m quadrilateral plan, the medersa used to accommodate 130 students rooms over two floors around an interior patio leading to the prayer room.
Explore more places related to this search:
unpinned
The Medina of Tetouan
The Medina of Tetouan has a strong argument, it was declared in 1997 World Heritage by Unesco. It is distinguished by the whiteness of the walls of its houses, color that earned him the nickname of 'White Dove'. Its medina is a maze of narrow streets and scenes of the most curious, intersecting conversations and charming small crafts shops with a special lifestyle punctuated by an extraordinary historical and cultural heritage.
unpinned
Alcazar of Jerez de la Frontera
The Alcázar de Jerez one of the most emblematic monuments of the city. Located in the southeast corner of the walled enclosure, forming a complex defensive system with the walls, towers and gates. The term alcazar, comes from Arabic, al-qasr and defines a set of buildings, surrounded by walls, which were the seat of political and military power. Fortress-palace with autonomous operation, a small city, seat of power that governed the city and its territory. From the original Islamic fortress, the two doors are preserved; the mosque, the Arab baths; the octagonal tower and the Pavilion of the Doña Blanca patio, located at the foot of this tower.
unpinned
The Cloisters of Santo Domingo
In 1264 the troops of Alfonso X conquer Jerez definitively to the Muslims. At that time, the monarch gave the Dominicans a military building of Islamic origin located in front of the door of Seville, to found their convent there. The first century of existence of the monastery of Santo Domingo had to be very hard, since the attacks by the Nasrid Kingdom of Granada and its North African allies were constant. The convent of Santo Domingo remained a united group until 1835, when the different confiscations of the liberal governments of Isabel's reign decreed the exclaustration and seizure of the assets of the convent. Although the church remained open to worship, the cloisters were sold. In the beginning, the owners were Los González, an important family of winemakers from Santander Mountain, who installed here the so-called Museum of Santo Domingo, a kind of trinket in which works of art, furniture and other decorative objects were sold. Then the complex became the property of the Díez family, who installed a cellar in the old bedroom and made a series of somewhat aggressive works with the monument. Los Dietros sold Los Claustros to the Rumasa holding company, which was expropriated in 1983, becoming the property of the City Council, which used it as cultural equipment for years. In 1999 the complex was closed for restoration, reopening its doors in 2012.
unpinned
The Cathedral of Granada
The Cathedral of Granada is to be understood in the context of the project for an imperial city envisaged by Emperor Charles V.
unpinned
House of Mariana Pineda
The creation of the Mariana Pineda European Centre for Women fulfils a threefold objective: honouring the memory of this famous woman with a great deal of popular support who symbolises the Constitutionalist Liberal cause in the 19th century; housing the offices of the Municipal Council for Women, which women's groups and associations have been demanding for some time, and opening up the space to the women of Granada, as a meeting point, a place of learning, a discussion forum and for projects that involve women from various countries to create a framework aimed at achieving gender equality.
unpinned
Medina Azahara
The Caliph Abd al-Rahman III was a great promoter of culture and a skilful politician who transformed his dominions into the most prosperous lands in the West at the time, comparable only with Baghdad and Byzantium. The city of Medina Azahara has a practically rectangular floor plan. It was built on raked terraces which made use of the slope of the mountainside. Each terrace was separated from the others by walls, which divided the city into three parts. The Alcázar Real palace is located on the highest and intermediate levels, while the lower part stood outside the walls and was used for dwellings and the mosque. There are still remnants of tiled borders, paintings and columns in the composite and Corinthian styles. Visitors should not miss a visit to the two recently restored rooms. It was declared a National Monument in 1923. To conclude the visit, the archaeological site also has a visitor centre which serves as a starting point for the tour. The centre is located underground in the style of an archaeological site, and features a collection of exhibits from the most important periods in the history of Medina Azahara. The tour of the visitor centre lasts about one hour and includes audiovisual shows, and continues with a visit to the archaeological site (which can be reached by bus from the same building).
unpinned
Alcazar Fortress Cordoba
This building was the royal residence of the Christian monarchs and subsequently the site of the Courts of the Holy Offices, a civil prison, and finally a military prison. It is set among magnificent gardens, including the garden known as the Avenue of the Monarchs which features statues of all the monarchs who had connections with the palace-fortress. It was declared a Historical Monument in 1931. The building is also part of the area declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO in 1994. Since 1986, its gardens have been protected by town planning laws. It stands on top of the remains of the former caliph's palace.
unpinned
Alcazaba Fortress
The Alcazaba, with its 1430 m. walled perimeter is Spain’s second-largest Muslim construction, after the Alhambra Palace in Granada. It was built at the behest of Abderrahman III in the tenth century after the founding of the city. It is a stronghold which housed three campuses; the first two Muslims and one Christian, last built after the conquest of the city by the Catholic Monarchs, which occurred in 1489. The fortress is situated on a hill, overlooking the old centre of the city, the medina. In it, we find a first enclosure where there is a large garden and ponds constructed during the Muslim period. The second area, the vast palatial residence of King Almotacín, stood during the eleventh century. This consisted of a public area, where today are the caliphate wells of the tenth century, a Christian arch of the 16th century. Finally, is the last enclosure of the fortress, Christian, and ordered to be built by the Catholic Monarchs, after the taking of the city. It is a Christian castle within the Muslim fortification.
unpinned
Cerro San Cristobal
From the Alcazaba, descend in a northward direction through the Barranco de la Hoya, a line of wall that reaches San Cristobal Hill, built during the time of King Jairán (1012-1028) in the eleventh century. Here are the remnants of the neighbourhood “amurallamiento musalla”, which descends from the hill via the main street Antonio Vico. On the hill, known in Muslim times as Monte Laham, there are seven towers, three square Muslim towers and four semicircular Christian towers. These were built by the Templars of Alfonso VII, who constructed a strong-chapel following the Christian conquest of the city under the command of the troops of Alfonso VII in 1147. On this hill, which has an impressive view of the city, and located on a large pedestal, is the image of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, constructed of local Macael marble. It was restored in 2000 and it is said to bless the city and the Mediterranean Sea. It was originally built in the twentieth century (around 1930).
unpinned
The Bone Chapel
The bone chapel is the most ghoulish sight of Portugal and thus one of the most memorable monuments of Evora. Inside the small chapel, the walls are lined with bones of the long-deceased, exhumed from the city's graves as the city expanded to allow further burials.
unpinned
The Praca do Giraldo
The Praça do Giraldo is the main central plaza of Evora and is the heart of the city. The square is lined by exquisite examples of 16th century Gothic architecture, while the simplistic Igreja de Santo Antao stands at one end of the square.
unpinned
Cabo de Gata
A spectacular place, a hidden corner by Cabo de Gata lighthouse, where yesteryear fishermen plied their craft and is now a perfect site for diving, as you can see from this beautiful photo.
unpinned
The Quinta da Regaleira
The Quinta da Regaleira is an extravagant 19th century gothic mansion that is surrounded with some of the most elaborate gardens of Sintra. The gardens are a joy to explore as they are filled with decorative fortifications, mystic religious symbols and a series of secrete passages and caves.
unpinned
Espantaperros tower
12th-century Almohad monument. This is known as the Watchtower or Alpéndiz Tower. The Espantaperros Tower is in the eastern part of the Citadel and is a watchtower. It has an octagonal plan Most of the tower is solid, apart from its two upper chambers.
unpinned
Puerta de Toledo arch
his gate is all that remains of the Royal Citadel of Ciudad Real.It dates from the 14th century. It has 6 arches (the 2 exterior ones are ogival and the 4 interior ones horseshoe shaped).
City
Ciudad Real
Map
Map
unpinned
Roman Theatre
In 1990 the first remains of what would be one of the most interesting monuments of the city of Cartagena were discovered accidentally. It is one of the largest and most comprehensive theatres throughout Spain. It was built in 44 BC when Octavian Augustus was emperor and Cartagena was a Roman colony (Colonia Urbs Nova Carthago) going through a period of high population and economic development; at that time it was called Carthago Nova. From its location, the theatre has witnessed different periods of the history of Cartagena, since the Roman Empire, up to the present, overlapping constructions of each of the historical periods. The Roman Theatre faithfully followed the theatre model proposed by Vitruvius. It was built almost entirely in the rock on a hill.
unpinned
Historic Center of Arona
The very heart of the town (declared an Asset of Cultural Interest) is represented by the church of San Antonio Abad, from the 18th century, located right in the space that a hermitage occupied a hundred years ago. Inside the temple, the image of the Christ of Health is its most valuable piece. Around, the stately homes and cobbled streets invite a peaceful walk.
unpinned
The Episcopal Palace
This one was demolished to give a much cleaner view to the facade of the Cathedral. Currently the Episcopal Palace occupies a place close to what used to be the Palacio del Alcázar.
unpinned
The Jesus Monastery
The Jesus Monastery in Aveiro is one of the city’s most important historical buildings and is well worth a visit if you are in the city for a few days. The Jesus Monastery is located right in the heart of the city, opposite to the cathedral and close to many of the city’s major attractions, including the lagoon, Forum Aveiro, the fish market, and the lovely green, park areas.
unpinned
Plaza Mayor Square
One of the most beautiful squares in Spain. It was built in Baroque style according to the plans of Alberto Churriguera. On the north side is the City Hall, a Baroque building that has five granite arches and a steeple decorated with allegoric figures.
unpinned
Porto historical centre
Porto, a World Heritage Site, is an old, intense and authentic city of an exquisite architectural and landscape value. Visit its historical centre and enjoy a glass of one of the most appreciated wines in the world.
unpinned
Guimaraes Castle
Imposing 12th century castle built on the site of earlier fortifications. The castle was the official royal residence from 1139 until the 13th century. Now classified by UNESCO, as World Heritage
unpinned
The Aqueduct of Segovia
It must have been one of the largest in the Roman world.The aqueduct is thought to have been built during the Flavian dynasty, from the second half of the first century to the early 2nd century CE under the Emperors Vespasian and Trajan in order to carry the water of the River Acebeda to the city.
unpinned
Alcazar fortress
Standing between the confluence of the Eresma and Clamores rivers, the first documented record of the fortress dates back to Christian writings in the 12th century. It was built on top of a rock, a testament to its original military status.
unpinned
Domus Municipalis
Classified as a national monument, nobody is quite sure what this unusual 12th century building was for! Built in a Romanesque style the building forms an irregular pentagon with a subterranean vaulted cistern
unpinned
Braganca Castle
13th century citadel surrounded by 15 towers. In the centre is the 33 metre high keep, the Torre de Menagem
unpinned
Penafiel castle
Peñafiel castle is built of Campaspero stone and is an example of the German Gothic style. It is 210 metres long by 33 metres wide.The castle is located on a hill overlooking the valleys of Duratón and Botijas. Its exterior is uniform in appearance, and it has a single door.
unpinned
O Castro Site
The O Castro site is Vigo’s archaeological site par excellence: this was the origin of what is now the largest city in Galicia, between the second century BC and the third century AD. When you step on the stones of this museum site, the O Castro de Vigo. A Orixe da cidade, you’ll discover where the first inhabitants of Vigo lived. The Castro is a 1 mile² archaeological site that includes the reconstruction of three castreño buildings pertaining to one of the largest and most evolved towns in Galicia. This small part of the Vigo oppidum shows us how people lived in castros 2,000 years ago.
unpinned
Episcopal Palace
This Modernist building in the neo-Gothic style consists of a castle, church and stately mansion, and is the site of the Los Caminos Museum. This monument was designed by Gaudí himself in 1887, although it was ultimately completed by the architect Luis de Querejeta.
unpinned
Carthusian monastery
Before the building was ceded to the Carthusian order, it was the recreational residence of Henry III of Spain, who decided to build this palace on one of his hunting reserves. The building was subsequently restored when his son King John II came to the throne, following a design by John of Cologne. Construction was finally completed in the reign of Queen Isabella, and the top architects, sculptures and painters of the time were employed for the job, including figures such as Simon of Cologne, Gil de Siloé and Pedro Berruguete. The Carthusian monastery became one of the treasures of the Gothic style of the late 15th century.
unpinned
Atapuerca
Atapuerca is one of Europe's most important archaeological sites. It was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2000, and a Site of Outstanding Universal Value, also by UNESCO, in 2015.