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Historical Sites in London

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Bramber Castle
Although now far inland, Bramber Castle was originally situated on the coast where the River Adur meets the sea. Built by the de Braose family it was confiscated by King John whose harsh treatment of Lady de Braose and her two sons led to the rebellion that culminated in Magna Carta.
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Marlipins Museum
The striking chequerboard flint and Caen limestone facade is part of one of the oldest Norman buildings in Sussex. The museum tells the story of Shoreham’s maritime and local history from prehistoric to medieval times.
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Temple Manor
A rare surviving 13th-century house belonging to the Knights Templar - an order of soldiers established in the crusading period to protect the holy lands and the pilgrims who travelled to them. Its original purpose was to provide lodgings and fresh horses for members of this order on their way to and from the crusades. The stone building that exists today once formed part of a larger range of buildings which included a hall, kitchens, barns and stables. Remains of 13th-century wall plaster can still be seen.
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Maidenhead Heritage Centre
Learn all about the history of Maidenhead AND fly in a Spitfire simulator at this little gem of a museum!
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Rochester Castle
The great keep of Rochester Castle towers over the River Medway, dominating the skyline together with its striking twin, the magnificent cathedral.
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Rochester Cathedral
Experience a spiritual moment in Rochester Cathedral and visit a church that has been celebrating Christian worship since 604AD. The history and heritage of Rochester Cathedral is boasted in its stunning architecture. Its walls hum with the prayer of thousands of years.
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The Bridge of Sighs
Neo-gothic covered bridge linking the new court of St. John's with the older original college buildings. Built in the 19th Century and named after the covered bridge in Venice, on which prisoners would sigh as they were escourted to their cells.
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The Bridge of Sighs
The bridge is often referred to as the Bridge of Sighs because of its supposed similarity to the famous Bridge of Sighs in Venice. However, Hertford Bridge was never intended to be a replica of the Venetian bridge, and instead it bears a closer resemblance to the Rialto Bridge in the same city.
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Medieval Merchants House
Within walking distance of Southampton city centre, the Medieval Merchant's House once stood on one of the busiest streets in Medieval Southampton. Under the care of English Heritage, it has been restored to what it would have looked like in the 14th century. There is a small back garden to the property which is planted with herbs which may have been grown in Medieval times.
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Flag Fen Archaeological Park
Visit Flag Fen Archaeology Park to explore how the prehistoric people of the fen lived over 3000 years ago. Wander through a Bronze Age village, sit within the reconstructed roundhouses, and stand where our ancestors once stood by the ritual causeway. Experience life in our prehistoric past and visit the only place in the UK where original Bronze Age remains can be seen in situ, the incredibly preserved timbers of monumental engineering achievement. Excavations on the site revealed details of a wooden platform and post alignment that stretch for nearly a kilometre across the fen. These were built up between 1350 and 950BC and are of great national and international significance. Due to the waterlogged nature of the fens, this unique monument has been remarkably preserved. It is believed that the post alignment consists of 60,000 vertical timber and 250,000 horizontal pieces of wood, spanning the wet and marshy fen to meet a droveway on dry ground at each end. All the pieces of wood had been worked and shaped with tools.
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Sacrewell Mill
The rich history of Sacrewell’s multi-award winning Grade II* listed, 18th century watermill goes back, as far as we know, to 1086 and the Domesday Book, although the lie of the land suggests the Romans were using water power at Sacrewell hundreds of years earlier – perhaps even from the sacred well that gives Sacrewell its name.
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Burghley House
Built and mostly designed by William Cecil, Lord High Treasurer to Queen Elizabeth I, between 1555 and 1587, the main part of the House has 35 major rooms on the ground and first floors.
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Bagots Castle
Bagot’s Castle, in the village of Baginton on the outskirts of Coventry, is believed to originally been built in the 11th century, at the time of King Henry I. It was rebuilt around the late 14th century by Sir William Bagot, a distinguished nobleman of his time. All that remains are the ruins of this historic castle.
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Lunt Roman Fort
It's A.D. 60; the Iceni of East Anglia led by the legendary Boudica have rebelled against Roman rule, and have just been defeated in a terrible battle fought somewhere in the Midlands. As a result, the Romans are building a series of fortifications across the Midlands, including the Lunt. Come and explore this partially-reconstructed timber fort. Stand on the ramparts, explore the exhibition in the granary and imagine yourself training horses in the gyrus - a feature not found anywhere else in the Roman Empire. The Lunt Roman Fort is only open during select Coventry school holidays. Please visit www.luntromanfort.org for more information about opening hours. Members of the public are not able to access the site during Coventry term times.
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Caludon Castle Park
Caludon Castle Park is a hidden gem nestled Coventry. The park is a special place as it houses Coventry's only castle remains, that of Caludon Castle set in a beautiful park land.
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St. Mary's Guildhall
Death, intrigue, scandal and spilt custard...are not compulsory when you visit St. Mary's Guildhall, but can be discovered in more than 600 years worth of stories from the finest medieval guildhall in the country. Located in the city's historic Cathedral Quarter, St. Mary's Guildhall miraculously survived the Second World War bombing raids and stands as a monument to the power and wealth of medieval Coventry. With magnificent interiors, collections of armour, historic furniture, artworks and internationally important tapestries, the Guildhall offers a window into Coventry's glorious past. A prison to Mary, Queen of Scots, a theatre for Shakespeare and an inspiration to George Eliot, St. Mary's Guildhall is a fascinating free experience for all ages, at the historic heart of the city of Coventry.
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Coventry Cathedral
Coventry Cathedral is a place where splendid medieval history meets modern architecture to stunning and poignant effect. Explore the Ruined Cathedral, destroyed in the Coventry Blitz during WW2, standing proudly alongside the magnificent ‘casket of jewels’, the iconic ‘New’ Cathedral. The New Cathedral features works by some of the greatest artists of the 1950s and 60s. Internationally recognised as a beacon of hope, Coventry Cathedral embodies a spirit of peace and reconciliation in a truly breath-taking setting.
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Abbey Park
Hugging the banks of the River Soar in the north of the city is Abbey Park – a beautiful green space to relax and admire Leicester’s riverside scenery. The park has a choice of activities to keep the whole family entertained. The boating lake in the centre of the park offers hire of both rowing and pedalo boats – fun for adults and children alike! On a summer’s day, relax and pedal your way around the beautiful lake in the centre of the park, enjoying the sweeping views of serene parkland all around. Heritage lovers will enjoy a stroll around the remains of the twelfth century Leicester Abbey and the ruins of Cavendish House, a 17th century mansion. The Abbey was founded by the second Earl of Leicester, Robert le Bossu. It became one of the wealthiest Augustinian abbeys in the country, but closed in 1538 when Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries. Whilst converting the overgrown abbey grounds into a public excavations revealed the remains of the abbey church and the other main building ranges, which can be seen in the park today. Those looking to get active can take advantage of the parks many sporting facilities, including a bowling green, five hard surface tennis courts, orienteering courses, a lavender maze and Ping! table tennis tables – perfect for those looking to try something new or get in some extra practise. Pets Corner is a favourite with all visitors to the park – an area to interact with a variety of small, domesticated animals. The area includes an aviary with a collection of exotic birds, as well as small enclosures housing hens, guinea pigs, rabbits, goats and pygmy goats.
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Belgrave Hall & Gardens
Belgrave Hall is a historic house, providing an oasis of peace and quiet in a busy city. The hall was built in the early 18th century in what was then a small village three miles from the town of Leicester. Now city traffic passes, almost unnoticed, just beyond the garden walls. Edmund Cradock, a hosiery merchant, built Belgrave Hall but died soon after its completion. The Hall has had several owners over the years, including John Ellis – a wealthy businessman who was responsible for bringing the railways to Leicester. Visitors can explore Belgrave Hall and the beautiful surrounding gardens on special event days. From April to September the gardens are open every Wednesday and the first full weekend of the month, with additional special events open to the public. Visit the website for more details on specific open days.
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The World War II Museum
La Coupole, located 5 km from Saint-Omer (Nord-Pas-de-Calais), is one of the most impressive remnants of the Second World War in Europe. It is a symbolic place of the Nazi oppression, due to its overwhelming mass, the nature of its underground facilities and the suffering of the slave labourers who built it.
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City Hall
City Hall, a Flemish and Neo-Renaissance style construction, is symbolic of the union between the cities of Saint-Pierre and Calais.Its belfry, which culminates at 75 meters, offers an awe-inspiring panoramic view of the city. It is also part of the group of Belfries of Belgium, Northern France and Picardie, listed as UNESCO World Heritage ;
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Norwich Cathedral
Norwich's magnificent Romanesque Cathedral is open to visitors of all faiths and none. In beautiful grounds it's an awe-inspiring, welcoming building with spectacular architecture, magnificent art and a fascinating history.
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Pero
Pero's Bridge is a pedestrian footbridge that spans Bristol's floating harbour, and was named in honour of Pero Jones, who came to live in Bristol as the slave of John Pinney.
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Cabot Tower & Brandon Hill
Cabot Tower, set in the gorgeous parkland of Brandon Hill near Park Street in the West End, is a 105ft tower built in 1897 to commemorate John Cabot's famous voyage from Bristol and the continent of North America four hundred years earlier. Brandon Hill is the oldest park in Bristol, where you can enjoy great views over the city and Harbourside area. Located just off Park Street in the West End, Brandon Hill features a children's play area, beautiful paths and a nature conservation area, and of course the icon of Bristol's skyline, Cabot Tower. Designed by the Bristol architect William Venn Gough and paid for by public subscription, the tower is built from red sandstone covered with cream Bath stone. Located in the centre of the park. It's free to climb up the steep, twisting steps of the tower, which is open daily.
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Clifton Suspension Bridge
The Clifton Suspension Bridge’s spectacular setting on the cliffs of the Avon Gorge has made it the defining symbol of Bristol, drawing thousands of visitors a year just to stroll across for views of the ancient Avon Gorge, elegant Clifton and the magnificent city beyond.
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Abdijmuseum Ten Duinen
Discover the role of the Lords of the Dunes of Koksijde in the Order of Citeaux, a European project before the letter.It's not a dull or dusty affair but a unique archaeological site and a modern museum that tells the story of the silent stones vividly. The religious Maldague silver collection has a permanent home at the Abbey Museum.
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Westfront Nieuwpoort
What does Nieuwpoort have in common with Namur, Brussels, Antwerp, Ghent, Kortrijk and Bruges? In all of these cities you can find a statue of Albert I, the Soldier King. These bronze riders mark the way the German army invaded Belgium in 1914, up until Nieuwpoort where they came to a grinding halt. This was achieved through the power of seawater and the smart coordination of the sluices and locks. But water wasn’t only an ally, it condemned Nieuwpoort to a crueller fate, the complete destruction of the city as first city at the front. A hundred years later the monument to King Albert I is a serene place in a beautiful landscape, surrounded by water. The ideal place to tell the story of the inundation. This happens in the hypermodern visitor centre ‘Westfront Nieuwpoort’ right under the 2500m² terrace of the monument, with a polyvalent inner circle and 3 exposition wings.
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The Cardiff Castle
The Castle you see today, in the heart of the capital city, is at once a Roman fort, an impressive castle and an extraordinary Victorian Gothic fantasy palace, created for one of the world’s richest men.
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Chateau Fort de Rambures
Listed as an historical monument in 1840, this remarkable example of 15th century military architecture is a starred attraction in the Michelin Green Guide and features in France Miniature. This powerful fortress with enormous round towers linked by curtain walls with machicolations and 'chemin de ronde' (high level path round battlements) was designed to resist the artillery of the time.
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Doullens Citadel
The origin of the name "Courtgain" comes from "small wages" and it refers to the picturesque sailors' district, crossed by two little parallel streets: the Rue des Moulins and the Rue des Pilotes which ends near the sailors' wayside cross and oratory with wonderful views. The closely terraced houses dating from the late 18th and early 19th century. They are built with bricks, some parts in cob, with a black base, the rest painted in bright colours, according to the age-old tradition of the fishermen who manned the shrimp boats known as "sauterelliers". The district, decked with lovely flowers, stages the Fête de la Mer every summer.
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Markt
Markt is the heart of the city and surrounded by many historical highlights. It is filled with pedestrians and bicyclists and a perfect place to get some rest or food in a local restaurant. Markt is dominated by its Belfry, for centuries the city’s foremost edifice and the perfect look-out in case of war, fire or any other calamity. You can still climb to the top of the tower! The statue of Jan Breydel and Pieter de Coninck graces the middle of the square. These two popular heroes of Bruges resisted French oppression and consequently played an important part during the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302. Their statue neatly looks out onto the Gothic revival style Provincial Palace. Until the 18th century this used to be the extremely busy Waterhalle, a covered warehouse where goods were loaded and unloaded along the canals that ran alongside the square. Today the canals are still there, albeit underground.
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Begijnhof (Beguinage)
The 'Princely Beguinage Ten Wijngaarde' with its white-coloured house fronts and tranquil convent garden was founded in 1245. This little piece of world heritage was once the home of the beguines, emancipated lay-women who nevertheless led a pious and celibate life. Today the beguinage is inhabited by nuns of the Order of St. Benedict and several Bruges women who have decided to remain unmarried. In the Beguine's house, you can still get a good idea of what day-to-day life was like in the 17th century.
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Belfort (Belfry & Carillon)
The most important of Bruges’ towers stands 83 metres tall. It houses, amongst other things, a carillon with 47 melodious bells. In the reception area, waiting visitors can discover all kinds of interesting information about the history and working of this unique world-heritage protected belfry. Those who take on the challenge of climbing the tower can pause for a breather on the way up in the old treasury, where the city’s charters, seal and public funds were kept during the Middle Ages, and also at the level of the impressive clock or in the carillonneur chamber. Finally, after a tiring 366 steps, your efforts will be rewarded with a breath-taking and unforgettable panoramic view of Bruges and her surroundings.
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The Caves of Naours
The limestone of the Picardy plateau was dug out in many places to form refuges. These refugees were called "muches" (hideouts in Picard language). Those in Naours, rediscovered at the end of the last century, are the largest known: all the underground areas combined can house around 2,600 people with their livestock. The layout is remarkable: around 300 chambers, public squares, stables, wells, chimneys, and a chapel with three naves. These underground areas were used by the British forces during the First World War and were used as the headquarters of the German forces during the second world war. Exhibitions of traditional trades. In the park: games, 2 windmills from the 18th century.
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