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Historical Sites in Boston

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Freedom Trail
The famous Freedom Trail is a 2.5 mile red-brick trail through Boston’s historic neighborhoods that tells the story of the American Revolution. From the Old North Church to Faneuil Hall, and through resonant burying grounds, visit the temples and landmarks of the Revolutionary Era.
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Marble House
Marble House was built between 1888 and 1892 for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt. It was a summer house, or "cottage", as Newporters called them in remembrance of the modest houses of the early 19th century. But Marble House was much more; it was a social and architectural landmark that set the pace for Newport's subsequent transformation from a quiet summer colony of wooden houses to the legendary resort of opulent stone palaces. The house was designed by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The cost of the house was reported in contemporary press accounts to be $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. Upon its completion, Mr. Vanderbilt gave the house to his wife as a 39th birthday present. The Vanderbilts divorced in 1895 and Alva married Oliver H.P. Belmont, moving down the street to Belcourt. After his death, she reopened Marble House, and had a Chinese Tea House built on the seaside cliffs, where she hosted rallies for women's right to vote. She sold the house to Frederick H. Prince in 1932. The Preservation Society acquired the house in 1963 from the Prince estate. In 2006, Marble House was designated a National Historic Landmark.
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Place Jacques-Cartier and Place De La Dauversiere
No stroll through Old Montréal would be complete without a stop at Place Jacques-Cartier, a lively spot steeped in heritage. A meeting place for centuries, Montrealers and visitors alike gather here to admire the view of the Old Port, sit for a spell at an outdoor terrasse, take in performances of the many street artists and enjoy entertainment at every time of year. In fact, one could say that Place Jacques-Cartier is at its most magical during the Christmas season. Today, Place Jacques-Cartier teems with artists, artisans, portrait painters and musicians, however it offers more than just entertainment: history buffs appreciate the Nelson Monument, a 35-metre column erected in 1809, as well as the black pavement denoting the outline of the Château de Vaudreuil, former 18th-century governor’s mansion in New France. Continue your stroll east along Notre-Dame Street and you will come to Place De La Dauversière, across from City Hall. Today, it is a magnificent public garden where passers-by like to while away the hours, immersed in its rich history that begins with the very founding of Montréal. Named in honour of Jérôme Le Royer de La Dauversière, founder of the Société de Notre-Dame, it was the site of the Lemoine-Despins family home in 1750, then of James McGill in 1805.
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Chateau Ramezay Historic Site and Museum of Montreal
Walk in the steps of important historical figures the likes of Benjamin Franklin and cross the threshold of the Château Ramezay, a prestigious residence from the 18th century that recounts over 500 years of history through numerous exhibits and extensive multimedia circuits. A portal to Montréal’s past and the first building in Québec classified as an historic monument, the Château Ramezay offers insight into the events of the pre-contact Amerindian era to the 20th century and demonstrates how our history was shaped by the Native People, the French, the British, and the Americans. A permanent collection of over 30,000 objects and an array of temporary exhibitions, intermingled with multimedia portrayals of historical figures telling fabulous tales about this centuries-old manor, bring 18th century New France to life for a modern audience.
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Boathouse Row
Local boating clubs take great pride in their historic 19th-century boathouses, which line the Schuylkill River just west of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. At night, lights outline one of the city’s loveliest views, aptly named Boathouse Row. Rowers of all ages and skill levels flock to the Schuylkill River to practice, compete, learn and explore the sport of rowing along Boathouse Row, be it a single rower on a peaceful early morning or an exciting weekend regatta with lots of noise, colors and fanfare. Sandwiched between Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill River, Boathouse Row features a series of historic structures. Sandwiched between Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill River in Fairmount Park, Boathouse Row features Lloyd Hall recreation center and historic rowing clubs claiming the next 10 buildings all the way to the Sedgely Club, a private social enclave, which rounds out the Row.
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Fort Henry
Step back in time and experience 19th-Century military life at Fort Henry. As one of Ontario’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Fort Henry is a hotbed of historic activity. Take a guided tour, fire a rifle, sit in on a class in a Victorian schoolroom, watch a parade of traditional marching music, and stick around in the evening for a dramatic reenactment during the Sunset Ceremony. Visit Fort Henry throughout the year as it plays host to a number of Kingston’s favourite events like the YGK Craft Beer Fest, Cannonball Crush, and Fort Fright. Fort Henry is a can’t-miss stop during your time in Kingston.
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Bellevue House
As a Father of Confederation and Canada’s first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald has had a direct impact on how Canada has grown from a small colony into a world leading democratic country. Tour the gardens of historic Bellevue House knowing that seeds were planted there for the birth of a country. Sir John A. Macdonald, and his family made Bellevue House their home from 1848 to 1849. Wander through the family’s preserved kitchen garden to help the costumed gardeners, watch them wielding scythes to cut the lawn in the method of the 1840s and bite into an apple in the heirloom orchard. Be escorted on a journey back in time, following a maid on an Estate Tour to hear tales about the past at Bellevue House and its most famous residents. Explore the juicy deets of Canadian history through an interactive discussion led by an interpreter, while jumping on an Alternative Facts Tour or simply sip a cup of tea relaxing on the grounds and enjoying the view.
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Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac
More than a hotel, the Fairmont Le Château Frontenac is a Québec City icon. For over a century, it has perched atop Cape Diamond overlooking Dufferin Terrace and the St. Lawrence River. You can come inside and admire the recently renovated lobby along with historical artifacts going back 400 years displayed in specially designed cases. The Château was the brainchild of William Van Horne, president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, who wanted to build a hotel to draw travellers as a way to promote luxury train travel. Many famous people have made the Château Frontenac their residence during their time in Québec City. From Queen Elizabeth II to Céline Dion, via Princess Grace of Monaco, Leonardo DiCaprio, Paul McCartney and Charlie Chaplin, celebrities have made the Château Frontenac their home away from home.
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Old Quebec
A UNESCO World Heritage treasure, Old Québec is the only fortified city north of Mexico. Bask in the European charm as you stroll through the old quarters and take in over 400 years of history in the birthplace of French North America.
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Blue Cross Arena at War Memorial
Sports and entertainment facility. Host of family shows, professional sports, and concerts. Meeting rooms and catering available.
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Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum
Located two blocks from Camden Yards, this National Historic Site is Babe Ruth's birthplace and features rare artifacts, photos, videos and more. George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Baltimore's native son who became America's first sports celebrity and an international icon.
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Rock Creek Park
DC’s ultimate outdoor mecca is Rock Creek Park, a 4.4-square-mile expanse that includes numerous trails for hiking, biking and exploring. There’s more to like about the park, too, like a nature center, picnic areas, riding stables, tennis courts and Peirce Mill, an historical site.
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Washington Monument
Built to honor George Washington, the United States' first president, the 555-foot marble obelisk towers over Washington, D.C.George Washington's military and political leadership were indispensable to the founding of the United States. As commander of the Continental Army, he rallied Americans from thirteen divergent states and outlasted Britain's superior military force. As the first president, Washington's superb leadership set the standard for each president that has succeeded him. The Washington Monument towers above the city that bears his name, serving as an awe-inspiring reminder of George Washington's greatness. The monument, like the man, stands in no one's shadow.The Washington Monument, designed by Robert Mills and eventually completed by Thomas Casey and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, honors and memorializes George Washington at the center of the nation's capital. The structure was completed in two phases of construction, one private (1848-1854) and one public (1876-1884). Built in the shape of an Egyptian obelisk, evoking the timelessness of ancient civilizations, the Washington Monument embodies the awe, respect, and gratitude the nation felt for its most essential Founding Father. When completed, the Washington Monument was the tallest building in the world at 555 feet, 5-1/8 inches.
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World War II Memorial
The stunning National World War II Memorial is one of the National Mall’s most popular destinations. The memorial features two 43-foot arches, a 17-foot pillar for each state and a field of 4,000 gold stars, all in honor of those who served and supported the efforts from home. If you want to honor local World War I participants, stop by the nearby DC War Memorial, one of the Mall’s hidden gems.
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Lincoln Memorial
"In this temple, as in the hearts of the people for whom he saved the Union, the memory of Abraham Lincoln is enshrined forever."Beneath these words, the 16th President of the United States—the Great Emancipator and preserver of the nation during the Civil War—sits immortalized in marble. Since its dedication on Memorial Day, 1922, the Lincoln Memorial has become the site of some of the nation’s most important social demonstrations, perhaps most notably Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech.Lincoln is surrounded by 36 Doric columns, one for each state at the time of his death. By the time construction was finished, 12 more states had joined the Union, so the names of all 48 states are carved around the top of the 99 foot tall structure. A plaque for Alaska and Hawaii was added later. The Southern and Northern interior walls of the memorial are inscribed with the full text of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and 2nd Inaugural Address, respectively. Construction was completed in May, 1922 and the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated on Memorial Day, May 30, 1922.
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Theodore Roosevelt Island
Reachable by footbridge off the George Washington Memorial Parkway, Theodore Roosevelt Island pays homage to the great conservationist. You will find nearly two miles of trails that traverse through forest and wetland, as well as a 17-foot statue dedicated to the historic figure. Via the trails, you can encounter beautiful views of the Potomac River.
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Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site
Theodore Roosevelt began his presidential journey here. All new state-of-the-art exhibits and a dramatic guided tour offer a museum experience unlike any other. Immerse yourself in the sights, sounds and emotions surrounding this pivotal moment in our nation’s history and learn how the enduring legacy of one of America’s greatest presidents affects our lives today.
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Buffalo City Hall
From the architects George J. Dietel and John J. Wade, Buffalo City Hall was built between 1929-1931. Buffalo City Hall is an Art Deco masterpiece with outstanding murals depicting the city’s history and industry. Common Council Chamber with exquisite skylight and sculptures are a must-see. Observation Tower gives a spectacular view of the waterfront and the Ellicott radial street design for Buffalo. Closed weekends and holidays.
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Halifax Citadel National Historic Site
The Halifax Citadel is a must-see stop on any itinerary when visiting Halifax. Majestically set upon an expansive hill overlooking the city, it is part of a series of forts – each one showcasing changes over time to its defenses, each significantly different than its predecessor – that protected Halifax Harbour from 1749 to 1906. It was so strategically important that it was rebuilt three times yet it was never once attacked. Today, this historic fort offers a fascinating window into our colonial past. Spend time exploring the Halifax Citadel’s grounds and meticulously recreated period rooms, including the barracks, tailor shop and school. Even join the 78th Highlanders in their period uniforms for the day and see if you are up for the job of keeping Halifax safe from enemy attack. Heft a soldier’s knapsack in the barracks, stand in awe as the Royal Artillery command the firing of the noon gun, and ask a soldier what garrison life in the Halifax Citadel was really like.
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Flight 93 National Memorial
Flight 93 National Memorial is a place to learn about the 40 passengers and crew members of Flight 93 whose actions thwarted the hijackers’ attempt to target Washington, DC, and most likely the US Capitol. The memorial is a place to walk beside their final resting place and honor the extraordinary courage of those who fought back against the terrorists.
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Griffin House
Visit this preserved early 19th century home, set on a hilltop overlooking the beautiful Dundas Valley. Explore the history of Enerals Griffin and other early Black settlers, and enjoy a walk along nearby trails. Griffin House host a variety of events, workshops and exhibitions throughout the year.
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Carnegie Museum of Natural History
Carnegie Museum of Natural History, one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, is among the top natural history museums in the country. It maintains, preserves, and interprets an extraordinary collection of artifacts, objects, and scientific specimens used to broaden understanding of evolution, conservation, and biodiversity.
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Duqesne Incline
Enjoy a spectacular panorama of Pittsburgh and its three rivers. Ride to the incline's Observation Deck in the 140-year-old Incline car to see what USA Today Weekend Magazine calls one of the "10 most beautiful views in America".
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Richard Howe house
As the resident engineer of the Ohio & Erie Canal from 1825 to 1832, Howe supervised the completion of the Ohio & Erie Canal from Cleveland to Massillon. Howe's responsibilities included engineering and designing the canal prism and locks between Massillon and Cleveland, including the fifteen-step lift locks built in the Cascade Locks Park.
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Edsel & Eleanor Ford House
Discover the private estate of one of America's most iconic automotive families. The stunning architecture, the expansive lakefront gardens and grounds, the historic cars - all give a glimpse into the Ford family's life at the estate.
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Blandwood Mansion
A National Historic Landmark; originally constructed in 1795, Blandwood later served as N.C. Governor John Motley Morehead’s home. In 1844, A.J. Davis designed an addition, transforming the farmhouse into an Italianate wonder. Visit today to see the original architecture and family furnishings
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German Village
And for family, friends, and visitors, it’s also a home away from home. That’s because you don’t have to live in German Village to live here. In German Village, its mission is simple: preserve, protect and promote life among the bricks. German Village Business Community is a collection of independent businesses, sharing resources and working together to promote the historic business community of German Village. Whether you’re planning a night out on our bricks or visiting for the weekend, you’ll find what you’re looking for when you click Shop. Dine. Stroll. above.
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Sauder Village
But it’s not the buildings that make history come alive at this attraction; rather, it’s the knowledgeable staff, who explain and demonstrate the significance of each building and show what little slices of life were like around the turn of the last century. Sauder Village is, frankly, the most honest historical collection in our area. History there is not boringly preserved in a jar, locked away never to be seen; but neither is it pandering to the silliness or gags that some historical institutions have introduced to boost ticket sales. It’s not quite a journey back in time, but neither is Sauder Village quite of our time. It is, in some respects, a place where time just doesn’t apply. The institution was founded by Erie Sauder, who was also the entrepreneur behind Sauder Furniture, the nation’s largest manufacturer of ready-to-assemble furniture ? in fact, chances are probably decent that many will read this on a computer sitting on a Sauder desk. It was a way for Sauder to preserve some of the historic structures of the area, such as his first workshop, an old Lutheran church, a train station, and a working farm. Over the years, the village has grown exponentially. Now, beautiful, larger buildings house some of the most popular crafts, such as blacksmithing, pottery, and glassblowing. A lodge and conference center abuts the village and the popular Barn Restaurant. A hands-on children’s area is new this year.
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Old Fort
Enjoy a stroll through the sights and sounds of yesteryear! Visit the Historic Fort, where history is brought to life through hands-on demonstrations and re-enactments. Period specific events ranging from the early 1700s through the Civil War Era are presented.
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The Atlanta History Center
The Atlanta History Center is located in one of Atlanta’s most vibrant neighborhoods where the stories, mysteries and crusades of our region thrive. Our 33-acre experience features award-winning exhibitions, historic houses, enchanting gardens, interactive activities and a variety of year-round adult and family programs.
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Storytellers Museum
The Storytellers Museum is in a historic building that started as a general store; later, Johnny Cash converted it into his “Little Stage,” where his “Saturday Night in Hickman County” guitar pulls took place. For an unforgettable experience, come see the one-of-a-kind memorabilia and never-before-shown video footage of Johnny Cash; every visit includes a 20-minute Live Concert!
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Dudley Farm Historic State Park
At Dudley Farm, a one-of-a-kind authentic 325-acre working “Cracker” farm, you will see the evolution of North Florida farming through the eyes of three generations of the Dudley family; from the pioneer days circa 1850 through the introduction of gasoline-powered equipment circa 1945. Dudley Farm Historic State Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Some highlights include a visitor center, park staff in period clothing performing chores, production and harvest of heritage crop varieties and sugar cane, raising of heritage livestock varieties including Cracker cows and Barred Rock chickens, family farmhouse with original furnishings, general store and post office, 1880s kitchen outbuilding, cane syrup complex with autumn cane grinding, boiling, bottling, seasonal corn shucking, nature trail and picnic area.
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Mill City Museum
Built into the ruins of what was once the world’s largest flour mill, Mill City Museum is located on the historic Mississippi Riverfront. Here, visitors of all ages learn about the intertwined histories of the flour industry, the river, and the city of Minneapolis.
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Loring Park
Surrounding the Convention Center on the southern edge of downtown Minneapolis, the Loring Park District is a walkable residential neighborhood of historic institutions and cultural attractions.