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Fountains in Singapore

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Merlion Park
You’ve probably seen images of Singapore’s national icon, the mythical Merlion with the head of a lion and the body of a fish. The Merlion's body symbolises Singapore's humble beginnings as a fishing village when it was called Temasek, which comes from the same root as the word tasek ('lake' in Malay). Its head represents Singapore’s original name, Singapura, or ‘lion city’ in Malay. Today, you can glimpse this legend at Merlion Park. Spouting water from its mouth, the Merlion statue stands tall at 8.6 metres and weighs 70 tonnes. This icon is a must-see for tourists visiting Singapore, similar to other significant landmarks around the world.
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Dolat Abad Garden
Dolat Abad Garden: Imagine a hot sandy desert. Sun is up and you can feel the high-temperature rays in your every cell. Neither wind nor breeze. Nothing but heat. Are you ready for a miracle to put you at leisure? Are you ready to get cool and relaxed? Dolat Abad Garden (Dowlat Abad Garden) is somewhere you’re looking for! Generally, the Persian garden style is a really unique one indeed. UNESCO has listed 9 of the Persian gardens of Iran and Dolat Abad Garden is one of them. The moment you enter the gate you are astonished with the nature you didn’t expect to see. A manmade waterway with small fountains, walled with tall trees leading you to the pavilion in the middle of the garden. As you walk down the path you can feel the cool breeze touching your skin and the shade of trees relieving you from the burning sun. We hope that you are feeling better than those heaty moments before entering the Dolat Abad Garden.
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Bahai Gardens
The Bahai Gardens is possibly the most distinct tourist attraction in all of Haifa, and is very likely the most visited. Every year, hundreds of thousands of tourists and locals alike travel to the Bahai Gardens on Mount Carmel in Haifa, the most holy site of the Bahai faith. Last year alone, 750,000 people enjoyed the beautiful terraces of the Bahai Gardens, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Bahai Gardens contains nine concentric circles each filled with flowers, small trees, small sculptures, water fountains and pools. To the sides of the gardens are wooded areas designed to house wildlife and to cut down on urban noise. The 200,000 square metres of land were designed by Iranian architect Fariborz Sahba funded by donations made only by Bahais, the world over.
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Roshen Fountain
The unique musical fountain Roshen that recently, in autumn 2011, appeared at the namesake sea boulevard in Vinnytsia has managed to become city's key symbol and to take the lead in the list of the country's major tourist objects. It is also in the top ten most spectacular fountains of our time. And there is no surprise in that, for it is the biggest floating musical fountain in Europe, by its characteristics similar to the world-famous musical fountain in Dubai. The Vinnytsia fountain is a truly amazing hydro-engineering structure that strikes with technical characteristics: its length is 97 meters, width - 10 meters, the height of the central jet - 63 meters, and dispersion of water is up to 140 meters. In addition, Roshen is the only fountain in the world that is installed not in the artificial, but in open water body - in the bed of the Southern Bug River. Another detail that makes Vinnytsia fountain unique, is the so-called "hibernating technology", which allows lowering the construction under the ice in winter. The fountain is equipped with an original laser system that allows displaying animated movies in a 3D format on the giant water-and-air screen. The size of the projection screen, formed by splashes and mist sprays is impressive - 16 x 45 meters.
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Peterhof
One of St. Petersburg's most famous and popular visitor attractions, the palace and park at Peterhof (also known as Petrodvorets) are often referred to as "the Russian Versailles", although many visitors conclude that the comparison does a disservice to the grandeur and scope of this majestic estate. Versailles was, however, the inspiration for Peter the Great's desire to build an imperial palace in the suburbs of his new city and, after an aborted attempt at Strelna, Peterhof - which means "Peter's Court" in German - became the site for the Tsar's Monplaisir Palace, and then of the original Grand Palace. The estate was equally popular with Peter's daughter, Empress Elizabeth, who ordered the expansion of the Grand Palace and greatly extended the park and the famous system of fountains, including the truly spectacular Grand Cascade. Improvements to the park continued throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. Catherine the Great, after leaving her own mark on the park, moved the court to Pushkin, but Peterhof once again became the official Imperial Residence in the reign of Nicholas I, who ordered the building of the modest Cottage Palace in 1826. Like almost all St. Petersburg's suburban estates, Peterhof was ravaged by German troops during the Second World War. It was, however, one of the first to be resurrected and, thanks to the work of military engineers as well as over 1,000 volunteers, the Lower Park opened to the public in 1945 and the facades of the Grand Palace were restored in 1952. The name was also de-Germanicized in 1944, becoming Petrodvorets, the name under which the surrounding town is still known. The palace and park are once again known as Peterhof.
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Tsar Simeon
Tsar Simeon's Garden in Plovdiv is created in 1892 by the Swiss landscape architect Lucien Chevalas (1840-1921). In 1879 Bulgarian knyaz Aleksandar Bogoridi invited Chevalas to become the official gardener of Plovdiv. For all his contribution to the city, in 1901 he was declared an honorary citizen of Plovdiv. Often he is referred to as “the Minister of flowers”. A Viennese pavilion is built in the centre of the park. The pavilion is with a metal openwork construction and is a replica of the 1936-Central Pavilion. All this was possible with the help of archival photographs and historical evidences from the Book of the fair. In addition there is new lighting in the park, and also new benches and modern children's playgrounds are installed. The trees and the flowers turn the park in a paradise garden. The pearl on the crown of the park is the renovated Lake with the Singing Fountains. You can enjoy the light show of the lake intertwined with water effects.
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Avram Iancu Square
On the western part of the old city walls, guarded by three bastions and gates, this square was initially a marketplace, which was going to be moved to the central square. Eventually, the marketplace was moved closer to the railroad, in the current location of Mihai Viteazul square. Thus, at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century the walls and gates of the city were demolished, and a small park was arranged in this square. Later, new buildings were erected here, such as the National Theater, the Orthodox Cathedral, the building of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry, in the Art Nouveau style (today, the office of the Cluj Prefecture); the building of the old “Unió” Masonic Lodge (no. 7 Avram Iancu Sq.); the building of the old military garrison (today, the building of the County School Inspectorate, also known in the oral tradition of the city as the “red building”, a name earned by the red brick walls of the building); the Palace of Justice, where the Court of Appeal and the Tribunal are housed; the EMKE Palace (Hungarian Cultural Association of Transylvania), later purchased by MÁV (Magyar Államvasútak, Hungarian State Railroads), currently the headquarters of the CFR Regional Office; the building of the Archbishopric of Vad, Feleac and Cluj, which houses the Faculty of Orthodox Theology and the building of the Protestant Theology, on the old site of the Reformed Church’s Prayer House.
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Central Park Simion Barnutiu
Creating Central Park had been one of the first initiatives of urban remodelling of the city at the end of the 19th century. Its purpose had been the creation of a leisure spot in the close proximity of the city center. The initial name of the area field was ants’ grove situated on the bank of the river Somes. At the beginning of the 19th century, this spot was visited by all citizens of Cluj, the furrier János Meleg provided the public with refreshments. In 1827, the Women’s Charity Organization will rent the grove with the intention to create a “place suitable for longer strolls” and a beer garden based on a contract of 12 months. This contract would also determine the municipality to initiate and sponsor some of the works necessary to drain and consolidate the land that had been a swampy area frequently flooded by the river. In the year 1833, together with the return of the Gubernium a decision will be made on how to spend the gathered money on the development of the park. On this occasion they will establish and name the members of the Promenade comity, a council made up of important members of the urban community; they will also employ the gardener József Schütz to plant, clean and maintain the park. The park itself had been originally founded on the 22nd April 1838 and after two years the engineer Sámuel Hermann was entrusted with the design of the park.
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Kadriorg Park
Kadriorg Park is the most outstanding palatial and urban park in Estonia, covering around 70 hectares. Its construction began in 1718 on the orders of Russian tsar Peter I. Elements of park design from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries can be seen here. The most popular places for a stroll in the park are the flower beds surrounding the Swan Pond and the promenade leading from there to the president's palace. There are a number of museums in the park, including KUMU (the Estonian Art Museum), Kadriorg Art Museum and the Mikkeli Museum, as well as monuments to such cultural figures as sculptor Amandus Adamson, author F. R. Kreutzwald and artist Jaan Koort.
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Rzeszow Multimedia Fountain
At the foot of the Castle and the Palace of the Lubomirski year is Rzeszów Multimedia Fountain. The main attraction of the complex of fountains are dancing to the music streams of water and water screen, which displays and laser film presentations. The most popular are special screenings, presented on Saturday evenings. Performances, which is a combination of music, light and water, you can enjoy every day from May to October. Amphitheater, fountain and Lubomirski Alley highlighting historic trees, is an attractive place: fun for children, youth meetings and recreation for locals and tourists.
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Margaret Island
Walking the length of the island takes about 20 minutes, but most visitors spend time at the Hajós Alfréd and the Palatinus outdoor pools. The Palatinus water park is a popular place in the summer, especially on the weekends. The 11 outdoor pools, including two for children, are in a beautiful setting. If it is too cold to go for a swim, an island tour introduces relics hailing back to the island's religious origins, including a 12th century convent and ruins of a Franciscan and a Dominican church. During summer months, bicycles, inline skates and 'bringóhintó', a four-wheeled bike for four, are available for rent. Since vehicles are prohibited, the island is a fantastic escape from the bustle of the big city and a great place to work out, swim a few laps, or go for a run. Other attractions on the island include the Centennial Memorial which commemorates the 100th anniversary of Budapest, a Japanese Garden, a tiny zoo, a music fountain, and an octagonal water tower, built in Art Nouveau style in 1911. The outdoor theater hosts operas, concerts and plays during summer. The thermal water on Margaret Island is famous for its healing effects. The natural, thermal water running beneath the island was first brought to the surface in 1886. In addition to its healing power, a day at the Danubius Health Spa is also a great way to relax and unwind.
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The Riva
The Riva started to look the way it does today two centuries ago, when the French, in time of Napoleon ruled these parts through Marshal Marmont. Today this promenade is the cities living room, the most popular and most important public place in Split. In the meantime, it has been widened and reconstructed several times, but it was always blessed with the most spectacular setting, the south facade of the Diocletian Palace, with the entrance into the Substructures, and later on with the buildings that were built west of the Palace, also the Franciscan monastery with the church of St. Francis, and the Bajamonti Dešković Palace and last but not least the Port Authorities building on the east end. Riva today is pedestrian heaven, thrusting with Cafés and restaurants, an ideal place for having your morning or afternoon coffee, or for an evening out with friends over drinks. Riva is the stage of the city life of Split, a venue for numerous cultural and entertainment events, boisterous Split carnival, as well as the stage for meeting Split sportsmen after countless successes, such as Goran Ivanišević, Hajduk football club players and Jugoplastika basketball players, Olimpic medal winners... Riva is also a political forum, with decades of political opportunities being depicted through mass rallies. Naturally, Riva is always at its best in time of Sudamja, a celebration dedicated to St. Domnius, the patron saint of Split.
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Nibelungendenkmal
The Monument to the Nibelungs or Nibelung Fountain is dedicated to a scene from the great medieval German epos: the meeting of Kriemhild, Queen of Burgundy, and Etzel, King of the Huns, in Tulln. It is depicted in a set of bronze sculptures by sculpture Michail Nogin. The Nibelung Fountain is truly a sight to behold on summer nights. An integrated and esthetic light-water-stone composition of the fountain sculptor Hans Muhr lends the artwork even more depth: the fountains of water rise out of an open book – Lay of the Nibelung. The fountains alternately become stronger on each side until their streams of water finally touch and mix – this feature also corresponds to the symbolism of two worlds, East and West, approaching each other in Tulln.
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Zrinjevac Park
Zrinjevac Park is a part of Zagreb Lenuci horseshoe. Just south of the central Ban Jelačić Square. It is just a short stroll away. In the park, you may relive Zagreb’s rich history. The centrepiece of the park is the 19th century Music pavilion which serves as an open-air concert stage surrounded by Zagreb institutions. It consists of a 19th-century music pavilion, several fountains, 130 years old weather monitoring station and monuments to famous Croatians: Julije Klović, Andrija Medulić, Fran Krsto Frankopan, Nikola Jurišić, Ivan Kukuljević Sakcinski and Ivan Mažuranić. The park is also home to Zagreb’s first fountain. Designed by Herman Bollé and built-in 1878 the fountain is popularly known as “The Mushroom”.
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Ivan Kobler Square
Passing under the round City Tower, the former main medieval town entrance that gave access to the coast, you enter the centre of Rijeka’s Old Town. Located in the modern-day Ivan Kobler Square, there was once a more compact municipal centre called Placa, which served the significantly smaller fortified medieval town. The most knowledgeable historical interpretations of Rijeka Town present it as vertically elongated, framed to the north and south by the City Tower and the Town Hall, and to the east and west by chains of houses. The northern part of Rijeka was dominated by the lord's castle, the eastern part featured the main commoners’ church with a cemetery, to the west there was a spacious cloistered enclosure, and here, in the south quarter, near the embankment and the beach market under the town walls, there was the vibrant heart of the Town. There, the citizens of Rijeka would meet to listen to the proclamations of the Town Crier, seal contracts and buy and sell on the open market or in stores situated in the ground floors of houses. Only traces of those houses remain now, with several old walls integrated into more modern buildings, a baroque lintel with the former owner’s coat of arms and an arched underground corn house. In the near past was the former town “Greenmarket” where fruit and vegetables were sold.
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Lindwurm Fountain
The dragon depicted on the fountain is the symbol of the city. There is a lovely square around it where you can sit and relax. In the 13th century a dragon was wreaking havoc in Klagenfurt, causing floods that destroyed crossings and threatened travelers along the River Glen. A duke offered a reward for anyone who could capture it, and a brave young man tied a bull to a chain and caught the dragon like a fish. In 1335 the dragon’s skull was found in a nearby quarry aptly known as Dragon’s Grave. The capital city of Carinthia proudly displayed it in the city’s town hall, and in 1590 Ulrich Vogelsang used it to make what is often cited as the earliest known reconstruction of an extinct animal—it’s attributed to Vogelsang, but it’s more likely an anonymous artist made the sculpture, carved from a single block of chlorite slate. Legend claims 300 men, dressed in all white, carried the six-ton beast to the center of town.
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St. James' Park
Located right in the centre of Opatija, St. James’ Park is a recognisable landmark of the town. The well-manicured green lawns and the harmony of colourful flowers make a perfect setting next to the Church of St. James. The park is distinguished by its neo-baroque fountain with sculptures of Helios and Selene (the god of the Sun and goddess of the Moon in Greek mythology), a work by the sculptor Hans Rathausky. The park stretches down to the sea where the Juraj Šporer Art Pavilion is located – the venue of many artistic events and exhibitions.
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Hellbrunn Palace & Trick Fountains
For more than 400 years, Hellbrunn Palace has enchanted and amazed its visitors with its trick fountains. A unique experience with all kinds of surprises in store! The idyllic location in the south of Salzburg was ideal in many regards: Hellbrunn Mountain is a naturally abundant source of water, which inevitably became a central design feature of the palace grounds. The centerpiece is provided by Mannerist trick fountains that are absolutely unique. From a mechanical theater to water-spewing stags, to a crown dancing atop a spout of water - the many-and-varied hydraulic attractions never fail to captivate visitors with their originality and astonishing effects. The spacious parks and gardens of Hellbrunn Palace are partially landscaped, partially natural biotope. They are a marvelous place to unwind, take a walk and enjoy a bit of outdoor sport. Children will immediately be drawn to the big adventure playground. And in winter, too, Hellbrunn is always well worth a visit: During the run-up to Christmas, the palace courtyard and the old driveway are transformed into a festive Advent market.
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Villa Borghese
Villa Borghese of Rome is one of the largest urban parks in Europe. The State acquired the gardens from the Borghese family in 1901 and opened them to the public on 12 July 1903. What differentiates Villa Borghese from other large parks such as Hyde Park or Central Park is the perfect combination between nature and Roman art. Villa Borghese is home to interesting architectural elements, sculptures, monuments and fountains created at different times by famous artists. If you have enough time in Rome, travel with children or are looking for a little relaxation, the Villa Borghese is a mandatory stop in your itinerary. If you want to tour the Villa Borghese and take advantage of the time to do some exercise, it is possible to rent rollerblades, bicycles and other forms of transportation at the main gates.
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Trevi Fountain
The Trevi fountain, inspired by Roman triumphal arches, is the largest and most famous Baroque fountain in Rome (standing 25.9 meters high and 19.8 meters wide). In 1629, Pope Urban VIII, asked Bernini to sketch possible renovations of the fountain, finding it insufficiently theatrical. After the Pope's death the project was abandoned. Bernini's lasting contribution was to situate the fountain from the other side of the square to face the Quirinal Palace (so that the Pope could see and enjoy it). The Trevi Fountain as we know it today, was designed by Nicola Salvi in 1732 and competed in 1762. The central figures of the fountain are Neptun (God of the sea), flanked by two Tritons. One struggles to master a very unruly "seahorse", the other lead a far more docile animal. These symbolize the two contrasting moods of the sea. Appropriately for a fountain resembling a stage set, the theatrical Trevi Fountain has been the star of many films shot in Rome, including romantic films such as "Three coins in a fountain" and "Roman holiday", but also "La dolce vita", Federico Fellini's satirical portrait of Rome in the 1950s.
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Vigeland Sculpture Park
Sculpture park in the Frogner Park with more than 200 sculptures by Gustav Vigeland (1869–1943) in bronze, granite and cast iron, including The Angry Boy (Sinnataggen in Norwegian), The Monolith (Monolitten) and The Wheel of Life (Livshjulet). Vigeland was also responsible for the design and architectural outline of the park, which is one of Norway's top tourist attractions, with more than one million annual visitors. The park is free to enter and open all year round, 24 hours a day.
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Marienplatz
Marienplatz is the central square in Old Town, Munich’s urban heart and the central point of the pedestrian zone. To the north is the magnificent neo-Gothic Neues Rathaus (“New Town Hall”), to the east the Altes Rathaus (“Old Town Hall”), and the passageway to Tal and the Viktualienmarkt (farmers’ market). To the south, the square is bordered by stores, office buildings, and restaurants. To the west, the pedestrian zone opens to Kaufingerstraße, which ends at the Karlstor (gate) located at the square known by locals as Stachus. Marienplatz has been the center of Munich since it was founded in 1158 and is the heart of the city. In the first few centuries, the approximately 100 x 50 meter large area was used as the central marketplace, which is attested to today by the fish fountain on the northeast corner of Marienplatz. In 1638 Elector Maximilian I had the Mariensäule (Mary’s Column) erected in gratitude for the city being spared during the Thirty Years’ War; Marienplatz takes its name from the Mariensäule. The column is used as a reference point in land surveying as the topological center of Bavaria. Today Marienplatz is a center for festivities and political, cultural, or sports events. During Advent, Munich’s oldest traditional Christmas market (“Christkindlmarkt”) takes place here.
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Herrenhausen Gardens
The Great Garden is one of the most important baroque gardens in Europe, captivating tourists from all over the world. The main attraction here is the recently rebuilt Herrenhausen Palace, home to the new Herrenhausen Palace Museum. The Garden itself presents a dazzling array of romantic fountains, exotic plants and striking sculptures. Events such as the international fireworks competition and the Small Festival in the Great Garden regularly attract large numbers of visitors. The Royal Gardens of Herrenhausen are Hannover's most famous attraction, a reflection of aristocratic savoir-vivre for more than 300 years. The centrepiece is the 17th-century Great Garden, one of the best-preserved baroque gardens in Europe. Be sure to visit Herrenhausen Palace there. Rebuilt to its original splendour and boasting cutting-edge, multimedia facilities, the palace now hosts more than 160 events every year as a scientific venue and innovation hotspot for the whole of Lower Saxony – very much in the tradition of a famous former resident: the universal scholar Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. The Great Garden is a place to lose oneself in, to marvel at the magnificent Great Fountain, which is 82m high (the largest of its type in Europe) and the Grand Cascade, to be enchanted by artist Niki de Saint Phalle's magically decorated grotto. And during the annual international firework competition, to watch transfixed as world-class pyrotechnics transform the sky above into a dazzling sea of trailing sparks.
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Water Tower
Without doubt, the most popular landmark for all Mannheimers is the water tower "Wasserturm". No wonder it serves as the backdrop to so many wedding and holiday photos. Romantic and dreamy, it stands in one of the most beautiful Art Nouveau sites in Europe. Its fountains, promenades and arcades are a popular meeting place for locals and visitors alike. You get the best view of the water tower from one of the surrounding cafés on the Friedrichsplatz. Sitting under the arcades sipping a cup of coffee is guaranteed to give you a Mediterranean feeling. On summer evenings, you can marvel at the water fountain choreography. In the winter, the Christmas market around the Wasserturm is worth a visit too.
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The Jet D'eau
The magnificent water jet is 140 metres high, with 500 litres of water passing through it per second at a speed of 200 km per hour! Used initially for distributing the Rhône's propelling force to the city's craftspeople, it became the Jet d'Eau when the workshops required an additional flow. Since 1891 it has graced the centre of Geneva's harbour, and is the must-see tourist attraction!
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Place des Terreaux
Place des Terreaux was once a huge bog, believe it or not. Today, the famous Lyonnais landmark deserves a visit, either as a starting point to explore the presqu’île and the City Hall area, or as a beautifully-constructed square to while away the hours. Place des Terreaux is a famous Lyonnais square, grand and grey. It’s a perfect rectangle in fact, located in the 1st district of Lyon inside the peninsular or ‘presqu’île’ between the Rhône and Saône rivers, at the foot of the Croix-Rousse hill. It’s a Lyon landmark and a UNESCO heritage site, the place to meet, inside which you can sip beer in the outdoor cafés, perch on the steps of the Fine Arts Museum and observe the Bartholdi fountain, or pop into the beautiful City Hall to pay new mayor Mr Képénikian a visit.
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Place de la Concorde
Place de la Concorde is situated at the end of the Champs-Elysées. Today it is famous for the Luxor Obelisk (a 3,300 year old Egyptian obelisk erected on the square in October 1836), the surrounding prestigious hotels, and the two monumental fountains (Fontaine des Mers and Fontaine des Fleuves). Created in 1772, Place de la Concorde was originally known for having been an execution site during the French Revolution. Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette (among others) were guillotined here. Between 1836 and 1846 the architect Jacques-Ignace Hittorf redesigned the square to become what it is today.
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Hyde Park
Set right in the heart of London, Hyde Park offers both world-class events and concerts together with plenty of quiet places to relax and unwind. Dip your toes in the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain, brave an open water swim in the Serpentine, or just admire the views across the lake from a waterside café. Have a go at boating, tennis, horse riding, or join the many joggers, walkers and cyclists enjoying the open air. Hyde Park has a long history as a site of protest, and still hosts rallies and marches today. Visit Speakers’ Corner on a Sunday morning to hear people from all walks of life share their views. Hyde Park is one of London’s eight Royal Parks and covers an area of 350 acres.
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Place de la Bourse
Place de la Bourse has symbolised the city of Bordeaux around the world for centuries and played a major role in the city's development, trade, and reputation. Both the Bordelais and visitors alike adore this very elegant square. It took 20 years of hard work in the 18th century to build what has since become the city's very symbol! The square represents a break with medieval Bordeaux surrounded by walls for centuries. The city was finally free to grow! Intendant Boucher had tried to convince the town aldermen and the parliament to create the square and open up the city walls since 1720. He decided to entrust Jacques Gabriel, Louis XV's "First Architect" with designing this rectangular square with bevelled corners, as well as constructing the famous buildings decorated with mascarons and wrought iron. The buildings framing this place royale consist of the Hôtel des Fermes, built by Gabriel's father, followed by the Hôtel de la Bourse built by Gabriel himself, and the isolated central pavilion (1735-1755). Place de la Bourse was originally separated from the river by railings, but these disappeared during the French Revolution. The equestrian statue of the king was briefly replaced by one of Napoleon, followed by the Fountain of the Three Graces in 1869…
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Cibeles Fountain
Built in 1782, the Cibeles Fountain has been standing in this emblematic square since 1895. One of the city’s most famous landmarks, it depicts Cybele, the Great Mother and Roman goddess of fertility, atop a chariot drawn by two lions. It stands in the centre of the Plaza de Cibeles, the square to which it has lent its name and which marks the start of Madrid’s avenue of art, the Paseo del Arte. The fountain is flanked by four magnificent buildings: Buenavista Palace (the Army’s General Headquarters), Linares Palace (which accommodates the Casa de América cultural institution), Cibeles Palace (previously the main Post Office, it now houses Madrid City Hall and CentroCentro cultural centre), and the Bank of Spain. Commissioned by King Charles III it was designed by renowned Spanish architect Ventura Rodriguez. All three figures were made with purple marble from the town of Montesclaros, in Toledo, and the rest of the monument was carved from stone from Redueña, an area 53km to the north of Madrid, close to the La Cabrera mountain range.
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Queen Elizabeth Park
Queen Elizabeth Park, Vancouver’s horticultural jewel, is a major draw for floral display enthusiasts and view-seekers, and as a popular backdrop for wedding photos. At 152 metres above sea level, it’s the highest point in Vancouver and makes for spectacular views of the park, city, and mountains on the North Shore. The 52-hectare park is home to the stunning Bloedel Conservatory. There is also a gorgeously landscaped quarry garden, the arboretum with its collection of exotic and native trees, sculptures including one by internationally renowned artist Henry Moore, and diverse recreational offerings such as tennis, lawn bowling and pitch & putt. The park is also the perfect setting for fine dining at Seasons in the Park, a picnic or stargazing!
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Devonian Gardens
When Devonian Gardens opened in 1977, it attracted international attention. Today it remains Calgary's only indoor park, full of tropical plants, natural light and balmy temperatures all year long. Meandering walkways lead guests past water fountains, over tree-decked plazas, to ponds teaming with fish. Enjoy the park during hours the CORE Shopping Centre is open, especially before or after the lunch hour on weekdays when it bustles with downtown office workers.
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Halifax Public Gardens
As one of the finest surviving examples of a Victorian Garden in North America, the Halifax Public Gardens is located in the heart of Halifax. Located on 17-acres and enclosed by a wrought-iron fence with a magnificent set of ornamental gates, take a leisurely stroll through the gardens to view many floral displays that include exotic and semi-tropical ornamental species, trees, shrubs, statues, and fountains. In 1874, the city of Halifax assumed responsibility for the original garden (N.S. Horticultural Society, 1836) and a civic garden (1867); the gardens were brought together by the present design in 1875. Richard Power, the Garden’s superintendent from 1872–1915, oversaw the introduction of the bandstand, fountains, statues, and wrought iron gates – all features of the High Victorian Pleasure Garden. Each piece honoured a milestone in Queen Victoria’s reign, a contemporary military event, or an important local personage. Recognized as a National Historic Site in 1984, the Halifax Public Gardens are a much loved and popular destination for locals and visitors alike. From mid-June to mid-September, the bandstand features afternoon band concerts.
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Parkwood National Historic Site
Step back in time and experience the home of the late R.S. McLaughlin, Canadian auto baron and founder of General Motors of Canada. Inspired by early 20th century Beaux-Arts design, this 15,000 square foot, 55-room mansion was built between 1915 and 1917. The art, architecture, gardens, landscaping and original furnishings are all faithfully preserved in this National Historic Site. Immerse yourself in the beauty and history of this National Historic Site through daily site experiences, a variety of special learning opportunities, and events that will engage your senses. From Mansion & Garden experiences to afternoon teas, there’s always something unique to experience at Parkwood.