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Fishing in Tahiti

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French Polynesia
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Maui Beach
Maui Beach is a rare white sand beach in Tahiti. It can get very crowded on weekends, but is peaceful during weekdays. It located right on the road but has shallow swimming, making it perfect for kids, as well as deeper spots for adults and some DIY snorkeling off the reef.
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Rangitoto Island
Emerging from the sea just 600 years ago, pest-free Rangitoto Island is the youngest volcano in New Zealand. An Auckland icon and deeply enriched with history, it's long been a favourite day trip for walkers, and a much loved boating destination.
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Hanauma Bay
Every year, more than a million people get to swim with the fishes in a marine ecosystem located on the southeast coast of Oahu, 10 miles east of Waikiki. Hanauma (or curved bay) Bay is a former volcanic crater that became a protected marine life conservation area in 1967. Since then, it’s become an underwater park for snorkel enthusiasts, swimmers and anyone desiring to see more than 400 species of Hawaiian fishes including Hawaii’s state fish the humuhumunukunukuapua‘a, turtles and other marine life. Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve is open year-round, except for Tuesdays, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Plan to arrive as early as you can or wait until the crowd trickles out in the mid-afternoon. During summer, the state park opens at 6 am and closes at 7 pm. It closes at 6 pm in winter.
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Saint Arnaud
Perched on the edge of Lake Rotoiti, St Arnaud is the perfect base from which to explore the honeydew forest and mountains of Nelson Lakes National Park. The village of St Arnaud sits at the edge of Lake Rotoiti in the Nelson region, providing an ideal base for people who plan to hike or fish in Nelson Lakes National Park. Both Lake Rotoroa and Rotoiti are well known for their fine brown trout, and if you walk along the jetty you’ll see some friendly native eels swimming around the waters below. The lakes are a popular destination year round for boating, water skiing, swimming and kayaking, and hosts the annual New Zealand Antique and Classic Boatshow.
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Nelson Lakes National Park
The Nelson Lakes National Park is an enchanting alpine landscape of rugged peaks, forests and stunning glacial lakes. A compact area of mountain ranges separated by forested valleys, the Nelson Lakes National Park is home to the beginning of the awe-inspiring Southern Alps. Promising everything from easy lakeside walking tracks to challenging alpine hikes, this national park has something on offer for everyone. The beautiful alpine lakes of Rotoroa and Rotoiti form the heart of this 102,000 hectare national park. Both are surrounded by steep mountains and fringed to the shore by native honeydew beech forests, which feed a variety of tuneful nectar-eating native birds.
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Murchison
Come to Murchison for whitewater thrills – rafting, kayaking, canoeing and jet boating. There are fast running rivers in every direction. Murchison is known as the ‘whitewater capital’ of the country, because there are rivers everywhere – the Gowan, Mangles, Matiri, Glenroy, Matakitaki, Maruia and the mighty Buller. For anybody into canoeing or kayaking, it’s a dream come true with the region offering some of the best all-grades options in New Zealand.
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Lake Hawea
An easy, scenic 15 minute drive from Wanaka and on the road to Makarora and the West Coast, is Lake Hawea. A place of vivid beauty, mountainous extremes and legendary fishing spots. Lake Hawea is an outdoor adventurers’ paradise and a great place to boat, swim, kite surf, kayak, ride, walk or just laze about on the beach. From Lake Hawea township you can find an excellent walk by following Timaru River Road to Timaru Creek, a picnic and camping area. The trail that begins here leads through a valley of beech forest until it flattens onto a braided river bed. With magnificent views of the surrounding peaks, and a lake to cool off, Lake Hawea offers a welcome respite from the long hot months of summer.
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Lake Wakatipu
Shaped like a lightning bolt, Lake Wakatipu is the third largest lake in New Zealand. The lake occupies a single, glacier-carved trench and is bordered on all sides by tall mountains, the highest of which is Mount Earnslaw (2819 metres). Settlements around the lake shore include Queenstown and the villages of Kingston, Glenorchy and Kinloch. Because of its unusual shape, Lake Wakatipu has a 'tide' (more correctly, an unusually large seiche or "standing wave"), which causes the water to rise and fall about 10 centimetres every 25 minutes or so. Maori legend links this phenomenon to the heartbeat of a huge monster named Matau, who is said to be slumbering at the bottom of the lake. Lake Wakatipu offers year-round trout fishing - the mouths of the Greenstone and Lochy Rivers are particularly rewarding. In summer, the lake's beaches are popular for swimming. The Lake Wakatipu Ride, part of the Queenstown Trails, is a leisurely way to experience this stunning part of the country.
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Glenorchy
This rustic town is a true outdoor enthusiast's paradise, located just 45 minutes away from Queestown. Set against a background of native beech forest and towering mountain ranges, Glenorchy’s surrounds are nothing short of awe-inspiring. Lake Wakatipu and the Dart River offer opportunities for jet boating and kayaking, and some of New Zealand’s best hiking trails can be accessed from here. Horse trekking in the area is also highly recommended. Glenorchy’s spectacular landscapes have become a prime location for film scouts, depicting many scenes from The Lord of the Rings trilogy as well as featuring in the Narnia movies. Twenty kilometres away from Glenorchy, as bucolic farmland gives way to beech forests, lies Paradise. Some say it was christened for its natural charms, others for the paradise ducks that live in the area. Nobody can say for sure how it got its name, but the one thing people agree on is its breathtaking beauty.
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Milford Sound
Situated on the west coast of the South Island, Milford Sound is a fusion of spectacular natural features with amazing visual cues around every corner. Described by Rudyard Kipling as the 'eighth wonder of the world', Milford Sound was carved by glaciers during the ice ages. Breathtaking in any weather, the fiord's cliffs rise vertically from the dark waters, mountain peaks scrape the sky and waterfalls cascade downwards from as high as 1000 metres. When it rains in Milford Sound, and it often does, those waterfalls multiply with magnificent effect.Things to do in Milford SoundExplore Milford Sound on a coach and cruise tour, go kayaking, or lace up your walking shoes and tackle some of the stunning tracks in the area.Cruise Milford SoundBoat cruises – during the day or overnight – are an excellent way to experience the Sound. Adventurous types might also like to head out sea kayaking, diving or flightseeing. To learn more about the local marine life, visit the underwater observatory at Harrison Cove and marvel at the black coral, 11-legged sea stars and delicate anemones.Go kayaking in Milford SoundMilford Sound & Fiordland's land-before-time landscapes are best explored by kayak. If you're lucky, you might even spot a bottlenose dolphin or fur seal.Kayaking offers paddlers an unforgettable opportunity to see the region's spectacular fiords at sea level as well as explore untouched waterways and lakes.Paddle up close to the thundering Sutherland Falls, which rank as some of the tallest in the world, and see if you can spot some of the local resident wildlife - dolphins, seals, and the Fiordland Crested Penguin call the region home. For the truly adventurous, enjoy an overnight kayaking adventure in Doubtful Sound.
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Frenchmans Beach
In the late 19th Century, four men sailed west from the French-speaking South Pacific islands. They landed on this beach, which was named after them. The four men, Jack Newfong, John Lifu, George Fenoch and Richard Martin, were taken to the Myora/Moongalba Mission, where they ended up settling. Descendants of these four men still live on North Stradbroke Island. Frenchman’s Beach faces due east, receiving little protection from the prevailing south-east waves. The beach is 500m long and is backed by steep, densely vegetated bluffs, access to the beach is either around Dune Rocks from Deadmans Beach, or down a signed steep walking track from the main road. The beach receives waves averaging between 1 and 1.5m, which maintain an inner bar usually cut by two rips, including a permanent rip against Dune Rocks.
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Lake Innes Nature Reserve
At Lake Innes Nature Reserve, near Port Macquarie, visitors can enjoy cycling, fishing, birdwatching, swimming, kayaking and learning about NSW convict settlement history. Whether you’re an eager history student or an outdoor adventurer, you’ll find plenty to do at Lake Innes Nature Reserve, not far from Port Macquarie. The reserve features a fascinating historic site set in gorgeous natural scenery with plenty of opportunities for hiking, cycling, birdwatching and water sport activities. Lake Innes lies at its heart and is a picturesque setting for the historically significant Innes Ruins, which is a great place to learn all about early settlement and convict history in NSW. You can book a tour of the ruins through the Port Macquarie Information Centre. The lake is also a gorgeous backdrop for picnicking, birdwatching, walking or cycling. Or, get out on the water by kayaking or canoeing across it or enjoying a splash of swimming in its tranquil waters or spot of fishing from Perch Hole. There’s an impressive array of wildlife to admire here too, including osprey, ducks and swans paddling on the lake and the kangaroos, wallabies and dingoes that can be seen throughout the reserve.
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Harrington Beach
Harrington Beach stretches from Harrington village to the picturesque fishing village of Crowdy Head, and is part of the Harrington Beach State Park. This quiet beach location between the two villages is ideal for relaxing strolls and fishing opportunities. Harrington break wall is a very popular spot for fishing, walking, and taking in the views of the ocean. There is a fish cleaning facility conveniently located at the beginning of the break wall. The Harrington Lagoon is located off the beach area; it is a safe swimming spot for families and is very popular during the warmer months. Car parking is available at the lagoon area off Crowdy Road.
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Harrington Beach State Park
Harrington Beach State Park is situated on the New South Wales Mid North Coast and comprises lands surrounding and including the Manning River's northern entrance. The 431 hectare site stretches from Harrington to the picturesque fishing village of Crowdy Head. The foreshores of the coastal beaches and estuary provide an array of year round recreation and tourism opportunities. The State Park also includes a small littoral rainforest that is accessible to the public.
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Skipper a Clipper Boat Charter
At Skipper a Clipper we offer a wide range of boats for you to choose from - power boats, yachts and catamarans. We invite you to spend your holiday aboard our yachts and want to match you up with the best choice. Explore the breathtaking beauty of iconic Pittwater, with its charming bays and coves, just 40 minutes drive from Sydney's CBD. Swim in the clearest waters, sunbath on the snow-white deck, relax on the soothing bay waves and experience the peace of the starry night sky at sea.
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Bondi Beach
The day begins early at Bondi Beach. As a glorious sunrise edges above the ocean horizon, surfers gracefully carve up waves, joggers limber up on the promenade and swimmers flip turn in Bondi Baths. The famous beach is buzzing from dawn to dusk and then Bondi’s night-time scene sparkles.The beautiful sandy beach is perfect for travel snaps or selfies at any time of the year. Just 8km from the city centre, Bondi is easy to get to by public transport – the trip from Town Hall is 30 minutes. Or you can take a scenic ferry ride from Circular Quay to Watsons Bay for a connecting bus to Bondi.
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Coalcliff Beach
Coalcliff is located 24 kilometres north of the Wollongong city centre. This is a small beach in the northern suburbs, surrounded by rocks and cliffs. It is also a popular fishing spot. There is a saltwater rock pool at the southern end of the beach. Explore the rocks for ocean life from this quite secluded beach. This beach is only patrolled from the commencement of the NSW school holidays in September until the end of April school holidays. Coalcliff beach is an on-lead dog-friendly beach during certain times. Time-sharing zone allowing access on the beach on leash in summer before 9 am and after 6 pm and in winter before 9 am and after 4 pm.
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Wombarra Beach
Wombarra Beach is a narrow 250 m beach fronting the slopes that lead up to the small town of the same name. The sand and cobble beach is located immediately south of the southern Scarborough rocks, with rocks and boulders backing the beach. It is fronted by rock platforms, leaving only a narrow break to provide direct access to the sea. A road provides access to the southern beach with a small car park and picnic area, however, this is more for the southern rock pool, than for the beach.
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Windang Beach
Windang Beach is located at the entrance to Lake Illawarra, 15 kilometres south of Wollongong's city centre. It offers spectacular views of the famous Five Islands off the Wollongong coastline. The beach is very popular with families and there is accommodation nearby at the local caravan park, which has views of the lake and the ocean. There is a large park at Windang Beach with barbecues, sheltered picnic areas, a playground, and a cycle path. Windang Beach and Lake Illawarra are good fishing areas.
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Lake Illawarra
Lake Illawarra is located between the Illawarra escarpment and the Pacific Ocean on the NSW South Coast some 90 kilometres south of Sydney. Water flowing into it is both fresh (from the escarpment) and salty (from ocean tides). The Lake is approximately 9.5 kilometres long and 5.5 kilometres wide, with an area of 33 square kilometres and a maximum depth of 3.7 metres. 13 boat ramps surround the lake and is a popular recreational location. The lake is a popular spot for fishing, prawning, and all water sports. There is a boat and catamaran hire close by as well as several caravan parks. There is also a shared pathway that can be enjoyed by all. Reddall Reserve on the foreshore of Lake Illawarra is a popular spot for picnics with its children's playground, amenities and kiosk.
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Point Dume State Beach
Point Dume State Beach features headlands, cliffs, rocky coves and vast beach access. The beach is presently operated by Los Angeles County, which also operates Zuma County Beach. These facilities are noted for swimming, surfing, scuba diving and fishing. Point Dume is a perfect place to watch for California gray whales during the December to mid April migration period. At the end of Westward Beach Road, access to Point Dume Nature Preserve begins from the cul-de-sac. A gradual ascending trail leads to an ancient coastal bluff sand dune. Visitors are asked to stay on the trail in an effort to help reserve this unique sand accumulation. An incredible view encompassing the entire Santa Monica Bay, north Malibu Coast, inland Santa Monica Mountains and distant Catalina Island may be enjoyed from the top on a clear day. A boardwalk, just below the summit, leads to a viewing platform - it tends to be more sheltered on a windy day. A stairway from the east side of the bluff-top preserve allows access to a more isolated beach and fine tidepooling opportunities.
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Zuma Beach
Everything for an exciting day out whether you want to climb a rock, surf, swim or just relax in the sun. Check out the nearby restaurants for full sit-down meals with great views over the sea. Hike the ridge, or watch the Dolphins and Seals. It's all hear at your beach, Zuma Beach!
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Malibu Pier
Malibu Pier isn’t one of the longest piers in California, but it is in one of the best locations. West of the pier you can walk for several miles when the tide isn’t high. In that direction you’ll cross Carbon Beach, La Costa Beach, and Las Flores Beach (the latter two are not easily visited from Pacific Coast Highway). East of Malibu Pier is Surfrider Beach where longboard surfers and stand-up paddleboarders play in the mild rolling break. Farther to the east, Malibu Lagoon State Beach offers a unique setting without million dollar mansions behind (although they are never far away in Malibu). The Adamson House and Garden (Tour) between the lagoon and the pier is cool to see when it’s open. Malibu Farm Cafe and Restaurant is at the end of the pier and has healthy food for hungry visitors. Nobu and other restaurants are nearby as well. Parking is available in the lot next to the pier and along PCH.
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The Great Barrier Reef
The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest and longest coral reef system, stretching for 2,300km from the tip of Cape York in the north to Bundaberg in the south. Comprising 3,000 separate reefs and some 900 continental islands and coral cays, it’s one of the world’s great natural wonders. Home to over 1,500 species of fish, abundant marine life and over 200 types of birds, it’s also one of Australia’s greatest conservation successes. A World Heritage Area since 1981 (the world’s first reef ecosystem to be recognised by UNESCO), it is highly protected and one of the best-managed marine areas on Earth
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Port Phillip
Port Phillip is the entrance to Australia's busiest port and is one of Victoria's most popular recreational destinations. Every year millions of people enjoy its vast coastline, world-class swimming beaches and coastal parks. An entirely different perspective however is available to those who explore Port Phillip by boat. Island, shipwrecks and marine reserves dot Port Phillip, while scuba diving and fishing reveal the colourful diversity of Port Phillip's marine life.
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Natural Bridges State Beach
This park and beach is an excellent vantage point for viewing shore birds, migrating whales, as well as seals and otters playing offshore. Further along the beach, public access tidepools offer a glimpse of life beneath the sea. Low tides reveal sea stars, shore crabs, sea anemones, and other colorful ocean life. The park also includes a large area of coastal scrub and grasslands, with bright native wildflowers in the spring. Moore Creek flows through the park, forming freshwater wetlands and a salt marsh before it reaches the sea.
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Balgal Beach
Balgal Beach forms part of the popular Northern Beaches district of Townsville North Queensland. Offering a superb sand beach and secure swimming in the stinger net from November to May, Balgal is ideal for a relaxing day by the ocean or a fun way to spend time with the whole family. The area is also a renowned river fishing location. For those wishing to explore deeper and head out to the Great Barrier Reef, Balgal Beach provides excellent boat ramp facilities and easy access to the spectacular Palm Island group. There are a number of licensed cafés and accommodation available in the area including holiday units and designated tent camping and vehicle camping areas.
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Veterans Oasis Park and Environmental Education Center
Chandler unveiled another dynamic, mixed-use facility in April 2008 with the Veterans Oasis Park and Environmental Education Center located in the northeast corner of the city at the intersection of Lindsay and Chandler Heights Roads. The center includes four classrooms for wildlife preservation and environmental awareness, exhibit areas, outdoor amphitheatre, nature store and an urban fishing lake, all surrounded by more than four miles of trails. A primary purpose of the facility is to recharge reclaimed water into the ground for later use. The staff works with local schools to develop nature-oriented activities that complement their curriculum. Programs offered for residents and visitors cover topics such as birdwatching, green living, gardening, water conservation, nature photography, orienteering, alternative energy and stargazing. Entrance to the Environmental Education Center is free and visitors are welcome to view the exhibits and walk the trails around the urban fishing lake.
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Waitpinga Beach
Waitpinga, an Aboriginal name meaning home of the wind, is about 10 km southwest of Victor Harbor. It is well known for its fishing, mostly salmon and mullet, and also popular for its surfing. Waitpinga is an exposed beach that has the best consistent surfing this close to Adelaide. Recommended only for experienced swimmers and surfers with what may be considered dangerous conditions. There are rough waves, with powerful rips.
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Chiloe National Park
Chiloé National Park is dominated by the Valdivian rain forest with a dense forest formed by trees, Evergreen, shrubs and climbing plants. In addition to the vegetation, its main attractions are the Cucao Lake, coastal dunes, and colonies of sea lions. This park is situated in the western region of the Isla Grande de Chiloé, which is an extension of the divided coastal mountain range. Created in 1982, the park has an area of 43,057 hectares (94,725 acres) divided into two areas: Chepu (in the district of Ancud) and Abtao, which belongs to the districts of Castro, Chonchi, and Dalcahue. The most attractive places in the park are the following: the Chanquín area, where lake Cucao and the coastal dunes are located; the mouth of the Abtao river and its diverse vegetation; Metalqui island and its colony of sea lions; the easily accessible Huelde lake and the Cole-Cole area, located north of Punta Huentemó, where there is a beach suitable for fishing, walking, and horseback riding.
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Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest
The Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest (UWCNF) encompasses Utah's Wasatch Mountains adjacent to the state's northern metropolitan area, and the north slope of the High Uintas Wilderness. Containing nearly 2.1 million acres of geological and ecologically-diverse landscapes, this collection of forest areas is one of the most frequently visited in the nation. Ski and summer resorts located in this forest along the Wasatch Front near Logan, Ogden, Salt Lake City and Park City provide world-renowned downhill skiing, Nordic and snowmobiling options, as well as a variety of summer activities ranging from the IMBA-certified mountain biking trails of Park City to the mountain coaster and Oktoberfest of Snowbird. Further south, American Fork Canyon and Provo Canyon offer a stunning mix of aspen and tree-covered slopes that include the zip lines, Blue Ribbon fly-fishing and singletracks of Sundance Mountain Resort, Deer Creek State Park and other destinations. Between the two canyons lies the 11,750-acre Mt. Timpanogos Wilderness.
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McKinney Falls State Park
McKinney Falls is a 641-acre park features over 80 campsites, including developed (RV) and hike-in sites. Screened shelters, group shelters and a group dining hall are also available. Outdoor recreation opportunities include hiking, mountain biking, bicycling, swimming, birding and wildlife observation. Onion Creek, which flows 1.7 miles through the park, offers both swimming and fishing opportunities.
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El Fortin of Santa Ana Hill Naval Museum
It was built in 2002 an inaugurated on October 31, 2003 as an initiative of the Ecuadorian Foundation of the Sea (Fundemar, for its Spanish acronym) through an agreement with the Municipality of Guayaquil and the Siglo XXI Foundation in order to highlight the importance of the maritime activity of the city – port, which, since its beginnings, had the Guayas River as the main commercial way to contribute to the progress of Guayaquil.
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Ambergris Caye
Ambergris Caye is the name of Belize's largest island. The history of the island goes back to the days of the Maya, European Pirates, and Mexican Refugees who fled during the Caste War. The descendants from Mexico make up most of the island's population today. The economy of the island was once dependent on the coconut industry, followed by the fishing industry, but it is now dependent on tourism. Ambergris Caye is the largest of some 200 cayes that dot the coastline of Belize. Ambergris is 25 miles long and a little over a mile wide, in some places, and it is located in the clear shallow waters of the Caribbean Sea just off the tip of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Her coastline is protected by the 190 miles long Barrier Reef, the second largest living coral reef in the world. In Mayan times, Ambergris Caye was a trading post. San Pedro Town is the only inhabited area on the island. It's atmosphere is that of a small bustling, fishing village but with "hot spots" of events, restaurants, and entertainment.