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Churches in Zurich

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Grossmuenster
The Grossmünster church is a landmark of Zurich. According to legend, Charlemagne discovered the graves of the city’s patron saints Felix and Regula and had a church built as a monastery on the spot. In the first half of the 16th century, the Grossmünster church was the starting point of the Swiss-German Reformation led by Huldrych Zwingli and Heinrich Bullinger. The theological college then annexed to the monastery spawned what is now the University of Zürich. The stained glass windows by Sigmar Polke, the Romanesque crypt, choir windows by Augusto Giacometti, bronze doors by Otto Münch and the cloister Reformation Museum are just some of the highlights see here.
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Minster of Our Lady Church
Known to Zurchers as the Fraumunster, the Minster of Our Lady church is popular to visit thanks to its graceful spire (which tops Zurich's skyline) and its Marc Chagall stained-glass windows. The church was founded in the ninth century by Emperor Ludwig, Charlemagne's grandson, though the property's iconic spire wasn't added until 1732. And in 1970, Chagall's famous stained-glass windows were added. Some previous visitors said the church's exterior isn't much to look at. However, most agree the interior's stained-glass windows are well worth a visit. In addition to the newer Chagall windows, some featuring designs by Augusto Giacometti, who is famously linked to the stained-glass windows at the Great Minster, are also located inside.
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St.Martinskirche Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic church of St. Martinskirche is one of the famous church in the city if Olten.
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Freiburg Minster
Every visitor who comes to Freiburg always heads straight to the cathedral as soon as he catches a glimpse of the open-worked pyramids of the slender tower over the rooftops of the old town.
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Churches in Bregenz
Around the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries, Bregenz was still a pronounced baroque city. Today, numerous baroque echoes can still be found in the cityscape. It is primarily church buildings on which the build and design-happy construction style of the 17th and 18th centuries made its mark.
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Church Saints Peter and Paul
The belfry with its gable roof, rebuilt in gothic style in 1220, is now the only surviving part of the original Roman church. As the nave of the earlier church was delapidated and had become too small, it was demolisched in 1807 and replaced by the present vast nave, built in the "barn" style in 1808 and 1809.
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Castle Church Spiez
Castle Church Spiez (St. Laurentius) is evangelical-reformed First church: 7/8th century (762 first mentioned) Refurbished: 1949/50
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Temple Saint-Etienne
This Protestant church was built between 1858 and 1868 on the site of a 12th-century church. Designed by J.B. Schacre, the church was built in the highly fashionable Neo-Gothic style. The stained-glass windows are from the original 12th-century church and are some of the most beautiful in the Upper Rhine region. Located on the Place de la Réunion, Saint-Etienne Temple is also a mecca of culture at the heart of the city with concerts, exhibitions and events, especially during Christmas period.
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Saint Martin Church
Built between 1235 and 1365 the Saint Martin’s collegiate church is an important example of Gothic architecture in Alsace. Because of a fire in the south tower in 1572 the framework and all the roofs were destroyed.
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La Collegiale
“When I was small, I thought the Château and the Collégiale were the same thing. They were so close, they seemed to be interlinked. Was it a church or a château? Most of all, it was the wonderful playground of my childhood! The years passed but the two emblematic monuments remain inseparable.
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St. Lorenz Basilica
One of the well known church in the city of Kempten.
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The cathedral of Notre-Dame
A prodigy of the gigantesque and the delicate," as Victor Hugo claimed. Strasbourg Cathedral (1015-1439) is an absolute masterpiece of Gothic art. The 142 m high spire looks incredibly lightweight and made the Cathedral the highest edifice in all Christianity until the 19th century.
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Russian Church
A glistening golden dome is the hallmark of this Byzantine-styled church, which should definitely be included on your tour of the town. Vladimir Potemkin and Bernhard Belzer built this spectacular structure between 1880 – 1882.
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Badia di Ganna
The San Gemolo Abbey in Ganna is an architectural complex formed by the church (consecrated in 1160), the bell tower, the cloister and the monks' homes. The abbey is located in the municipality of Valganna and is a place of worship dedicated to the memory of San Gemolo. According to the legend, the Saint walked to the abbey to be buried, bringing his own head in the hand. The cloister hosts the Museum of the Abbey with heterogeneous material, from prehistoric finds to nineteenth-century laces and embroideries.
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Santa Caterina del Sasso
Clinging to a sheer rock overhanging one of the deepest parts of Lake Maggiore, the hermitage is a monastery made up of three buildings dating back to the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. It offers a wonderful blend of art and history set against one of the most charming natural canvases on Lake Maggiore, in which the rock appears to almost form a balcony leaning out towards the Borromean Islands. The hermitage can be easily accessed via a short walk from the lake or a picturesque staircase with 268 steps from a large square above, and a lift has recently been installed.
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Lausanne Cathedral
At the heart of the old town, the majestic Lausanne Cathedral overlooks the city. Seen as one of the most beautiful gothic art monuments in Europe, it attracts more than 400,000 visitors every year.
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The Comos Cathedral
Como, the Duomo (Cathedral) seen from the eastern side of the piazza, where in only a single block, the Duomo, the Broletto and the city tower are located. Como's Duomo is the last of the Gothic cathedrals built in Lombardy: it was begun in 1396, ten years after the foundation of Milan 's Duomo.
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Santegidio in Fontanella Abbey
Visiting this enchanting abbey, established one thousand years ago, you will experience the very same atmosphere of knights, crusades and religious mysteries. Surrounded by the lush forests of the mount Canto, this church kept its charming and austere Romanesque architecture, decorated by the fragments of ancient frescoes, which used to cover its walls
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Sant'Orso Chirch
The archaeological dig carried out in several batches between 1976 and 1999, allowed for the building’s constructive stages to be rediscovered. The digs involved an area which used to be part of a large extra-urban necropolis, where, at the beginning of the 5th century, there was an early-Christian complex which also included the cruciform church of S. Lorenzo. At the centre of the south nave, the basement of a funeral building was found, it may be dated to some time between the 4th and 5th centuries A.D.; the primitive church, which was erected to the north of this mausoleum, consisted of a simple apsidal hall surrounded by a portico destined for use as privileged burial grounds. In the 9th century, the church was completely rebuilt and enlarged, moving the general axis of the building southwards, the eastern extremity has three apses, while the facade was rebuilt to the west of the early-Christian one. In the year 989, a bell tower was added to the facade, the remains of which are still visible up to a height of approximately 15 m. The archeological dig of the choir of the church of S. Orso allowed for a square-shaped floor mosaic to be brought back to the surface, it was unknown and not mentioned by the sources, it was made with black and white tiles with some inserts of light brown coloured tiles. A series of six circles inscribed in the square, acts as a frame for the central decorations. In the central medallion there is an elegant representation of Samson killing the lion.
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St. Ulrichs churches
Catholic St. Ulrich’s church: a richly furnished late Gothic basilica built in the architectural styles of Renaissance and Baroque.
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Allsaints Parish Church
It is presumed that a small chapel existed here as early as in the year 800. The All Saints church was first mentioned in historical documents in 1375.
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Court Church
The Court Church is also known by locals as “Schwarzmander Church” thanks to the 28 life-size bronze figures that stand guard, watching over the tomb of Emperor Maximilian I. Strange but true: eight of the “Black Men” (Schwarzmander) are actually women and the Emperor’s tomb is empty. But this beautifully crafted masterpiece is still a work of art and wonderful to behold. The Emperor’s tomb takes pride of place in the church. However, the building is also home to legendary local heroes, such as freedom fighter Andreas Hofer. In 1809, Andreas Hofer led thousands of brave Tyroleans against the superior force of Napoleonic troops on Bergisel. He was executed for this in Mantua but is still revered as a hero in Innsbruck. The Court Church is also the final resting place of his fellow soldiers Josef Speckbacher, Joachim Haspinger and Kajetan Sweth. The Silver Chapel is a highlight that shouldn’t be missed on a visit to the Court Church. Two additional famous people from Innsbruck are buried here: Archduke Ferdinand II and his wife Philippine Welser. She was a local superstar during her lifetime: the “Queen of Hearts”, a herbal expert and a bathing beauty who was even accused of witchcraft by malicious tongues. A magnificent silver alter and Madonna by imperial architect Giovanni Lucchese is the main feature of the room alongside another special piece: an organ with pipes made exclusively of wood.
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Milan Cathedral
The construction of the Duomo di Milano initiated in 1386 on the site of the ancient basilicas of Santa Tecla and Santa Maria Maggiore, which were then demolished at a later date. Dedicated to Maria Nascente, the cathedral was commissioned by Gian Galeazzo Visconti and had a dual purpose: the plan was to replace the sites of worship in the heart of Milan with an imposing edifice and it was also intended to celebrate the Visconti Signoria and its ambitious expansion policy. It is the largest and most complex Gothic building in Italy, made of pink-veined white marble from the Candoglia quarries, in the Val d'Ossola. It is 157 metres in length and covers an area of 11,700 m2. The highest spire measures 108.5 and, in October 1774, the golden 4,16 metre-high statue of the Madonna by the sculptor Giuseppe Perego was placed on its pinnacle. The construction works were prolonged over five centuries and, during this extensive period, local and European architects, sculptors, artists and workers all proceeded in turn to work in the Fabbrica del Duomo. The result of all their labour is a unique style of architecture, a fusion of European Gothic style and Lombard tradition.
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Baroque palace Mannheim
The imposing baroque palace with its impressive size is not without reason the largest Baroque palace in Germany. Stroll across the wide Ehrenhof, be impressed in the former State Rooms and the Castle Church or enjoy the student bustle of the University of Mannheim, which is located in the castle.
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Old Town Hall and St. Sebastian Church
The baroque backdrop for the market held here three times a week is formed by the ensemble of the old town hall and the parish church of St. Sebastian - which is incidentally Mannheim's oldest building. If you happen to lose track of time in the hustle and bustle of the market, two clocks and a bell tower are on hand to bring you back to the here and now. What's more, a glockenspiel sounds from the tower three times a day, charming more people than merely the wedding couple exchanging vows inside the walls. You can immerse yourself in Mannheim's internationality directly behind the marketplace. The predominantly Turkish-influenced district with its small shops and delicacies like baklava and pide can easily turn your thoughts to your next holiday. The huge selection of bridal and evening wear on offer here draws customers from over 150 kilometers away.
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Basilica St.Johann
It has been painstakingly renovated and is now a perfect example of 18th-century Baroque beauty. The pope even granted the church the title “Basilica Minor”. Not to be missed are the bronze portal and the entrance area, which were designed by the Saarbrücken artist Ernst Alt. The church organ is particularly striking. It consists of three individual parts, the main organ and the two choir organs. They can be played individually or together. The St. Johann Basilica organ is hence composed of 60 sounding stops and a total of 4,312 pipes. This remarkable and multifaceted instrument is exceptional in both its construction and its tone spectrum and is renowned far beyond Saarbrücken and the Saarland.
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Asam Church
The late Baroque Asam Church is located on Sendlingerstraße just a few minutes’ walk away from the Sendlinger Tor (Sendling Gate). It was erected between 1733 and 1746 by the Asam brothers and bears the official name of St. Johann Nepomuk. Originally planned as a private church for the builder, its Baroque facade is integrated into the row of houses on Sendlingerstraße. Two massive rocks arise from the base of the columns at the entrance. The luxuriously furnished interior breaks from Baroque convention with its proportional distribution.
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St.Peter
"The Kirche St. Peter (“Church of St. Peter”) is one of Munich’s landmarks, the oldest parish church in the city, and is known affectionately by the locals as Alter Peter (“Old Peter”). The church stands on a hill called Petersbergl, which is the only noteworthy elevation within the Munich’s historic Old Town.
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Christ Church
The Protestant Christuskirche alone impresses with its size - its round dome can be seen from afar and even towers over the nearby water tower. With its neo-baroque, magnificent exterior, it adapts to the surrounding villa district in the eastern part of the city - the Protestant church completed in 1911 is considered to be the most representative sacral building in Mannheim.
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The Basilique de la Visitation
Built between 1922 and 1930, the Basilique de la Visitation is the chapel at the Visitation monastery and the place housing the tombs of Francois de Sales (1567-1622) and Jeanne de Chantal (1572-1641), co-founders of the religious order.
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The church of SantEvasio
The church of Sant’Evasio was founded in the first half of the 8th century, at the time of the Lombard King Liutprand, who wished to honour the saint by erecting a great basilica over the little church of San Lorenzo, built by Evasius himself.
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St Peters Cathedral
Romanesque pillar basilica with a double choir and a transept, built 1125/1130 – 1181 on the foundations of a structure erected by Bishop Burchard (1000 – 1025). Elaborate decorations in the east and west choirs.
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St. James Church
The name of the church is already an indicator: Rothenburg ob der Tauber is situated along the Ways of Saint James to Santiago de Compostela. Over 1000 pilgrims arrive at St. James Church each year. World-famous: the impressive Holy Blood Altar by Tilman Riemenschneider. This is something you can’t miss – but a detailed visit of St. James Church, built from 1311 to 1484, is worthwhile for many other reasons. We’ll tell you why.A relic in a Protestant church? It might seem strange at first sight, but it actually makes sense. The Riemenschneider altar was not destroyed during the shift of faith (St. James was once an early Christian church and till 1554 a catholic one). The wooden altar in the western high choir represents the last supper. The relic is in the cross above the detailed carvings – wine from the mass, the blood of Jesus, was poured on a cloth. The altar offers several other surprising features: It’s recommended that you participate in one of the daily church tours of St. James so you don’t miss any of the altar’s secrets.
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St Stephens Cathedral
Built between 1220 and 1552, it is the product of the unification of two distinct churches. With its 42 metre high vaults, it is one of the highest Gothic edifices in Europe. With its 6,500 m² of stained glass windows, the nickname “God’s lantern” is well merited.