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Churches in Munich

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Asam Church
The late Baroque Asam Church is located on Sendlingerstraße just a few minutes’ walk away from the Sendlinger Tor (Sendling Gate). It was erected between 1733 and 1746 by the Asam brothers and bears the official name of St. Johann Nepomuk. Originally planned as a private church for the builder, its Baroque facade is integrated into the row of houses on Sendlingerstraße. Two massive rocks arise from the base of the columns at the entrance. The luxuriously furnished interior breaks from Baroque convention with its proportional distribution.
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St.Peter
"The Kirche St. Peter (“Church of St. Peter”) is one of Munich’s landmarks, the oldest parish church in the city, and is known affectionately by the locals as Alter Peter (“Old Peter”). The church stands on a hill called Petersbergl, which is the only noteworthy elevation within the Munich’s historic Old Town.
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St. Ulrichs churches
Catholic St. Ulrich’s church: a richly furnished late Gothic basilica built in the architectural styles of Renaissance and Baroque.
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St Matthaeus Church
St Matthäus Church was the first Protestant parish church in Ingolstadt and is the oldest Bavarian church built in this style. The church has a brick architecture typical of the era in which it was built and a striking façade with a single tower. Situated close to the venerable Franciscan Basilica, it still lends a particular appeal to the squares around Schrannenstrasse and Holzmarkt today.
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Court Church
The Court Church is also known by locals as “Schwarzmander Church” thanks to the 28 life-size bronze figures that stand guard, watching over the tomb of Emperor Maximilian I. Strange but true: eight of the “Black Men” (Schwarzmander) are actually women and the Emperor’s tomb is empty. But this beautifully crafted masterpiece is still a work of art and wonderful to behold. The Emperor’s tomb takes pride of place in the church. However, the building is also home to legendary local heroes, such as freedom fighter Andreas Hofer. In 1809, Andreas Hofer led thousands of brave Tyroleans against the superior force of Napoleonic troops on Bergisel. He was executed for this in Mantua but is still revered as a hero in Innsbruck. The Court Church is also the final resting place of his fellow soldiers Josef Speckbacher, Joachim Haspinger and Kajetan Sweth. The Silver Chapel is a highlight that shouldn’t be missed on a visit to the Court Church. Two additional famous people from Innsbruck are buried here: Archduke Ferdinand II and his wife Philippine Welser. She was a local superstar during her lifetime: the “Queen of Hearts”, a herbal expert and a bathing beauty who was even accused of witchcraft by malicious tongues. A magnificent silver alter and Madonna by imperial architect Giovanni Lucchese is the main feature of the room alongside another special piece: an organ with pipes made exclusively of wood.
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Allsaints Parish Church
It is presumed that a small chapel existed here as early as in the year 800. The All Saints church was first mentioned in historical documents in 1375.
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St. Lorenz Basilica
One of the well known church in the city of Kempten.
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St. Sebaldus Church
Nuremberg's oldest city parish church was built around 1215 as a three-aisled Late Romanesque pillared basilica with two choirs. As early as 1309 the original side aisles were widened and altered in the Gothic style.
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Churches in Bregenz
Around the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries, Bregenz was still a pronounced baroque city. Today, numerous baroque echoes can still be found in the cityscape. It is primarily church buildings on which the build and design-happy construction style of the 17th and 18th centuries made its mark.
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St. James Church
The name of the church is already an indicator: Rothenburg ob der Tauber is situated along the Ways of Saint James to Santiago de Compostela. Over 1000 pilgrims arrive at St. James Church each year. World-famous: the impressive Holy Blood Altar by Tilman Riemenschneider. This is something you can’t miss – but a detailed visit of St. James Church, built from 1311 to 1484, is worthwhile for many other reasons. We’ll tell you why.A relic in a Protestant church? It might seem strange at first sight, but it actually makes sense. The Riemenschneider altar was not destroyed during the shift of faith (St. James was once an early Christian church and till 1554 a catholic one). The wooden altar in the western high choir represents the last supper. The relic is in the cross above the detailed carvings – wine from the mass, the blood of Jesus, was poured on a cloth. The altar offers several other surprising features: It’s recommended that you participate in one of the daily church tours of St. James so you don’t miss any of the altar’s secrets.
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Pilgrimage church on Poestlingberg
This pilgrimage church, dedicated to the Seven Sorrows of the Virgin Mary and perched high above the roofs of the city, is the landmark of the Upper Austrian capital Linz. Just a few minutes' walk from the Pöstlingbergbahn stop, if offers a breathtaking view of Linz. It was built in 1748 according to plans by Matthias Krinner. The church is popular for weddings because of the unique location.
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Palace Church and Tower
This church from Margravine Wilhelmine and Margrave Friedrich in which the Prince wanted to be buried later was built in the centre of Bayreuth from 1753 – 1758. Fulfilling their desire, they were buried in a tomb with their daughter Frederike, Duchess of Württemberg.
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Cathedral Square
One of the most impressive squares, featuring architectural styles from all periods.The Imperial Cathedral with four spires is perched on top of one of Bamberg's seven hills and forms the heart of the city and the region's most significant edifice. St. Peter's and St. Paul's Cathedral was originally established by Heinrich II, who founded the diocese of Bamberg in 1007.
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Mariendom (New Cathedral)
The largest church in Austria is situated in Linz – the New Cathedral (also called Mariendom or Maria-Empfängnis-Dom). Beautiful glass windows decorate the cathedral, which was finished in 1924 and can accommodate 20,000 people. The sacred space is also fascinating. Mariendom is a haven of peace and an architectural masterpiece. Enjoy the view over Linz from the spire. Or experience the captivating view of the church's interior at a height of 15 metres on a special tour of the church's accessible inner gallery. The tours are also well suited to children aged 5 and above and to families.
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St. Vitus Church
Kostel sv. Víta je gotická trojlodní stavba pocházející z období 1407 - 1439. Byl ovšem vystavěn na základech starší stavby z roku 1309. V 17. a 18. století byl kostel rozšiřován a upravován. Gotický vstupní portál pochází z roku 1410.
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Dom St. Kilian (cathedral)
"St. Kilian” is a prime example of the architectural style during the time of the Salian kings. It is the fourth largest Romanesque cathedral in Germany and is home to exquisite artifacts from many centuries.
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Republic square
Pilsen's main square of the Republic is dominated by the beautiful Gothic cathedral of St. Bartholomew with the highest church tower in the Czech Republic. You will find many beautiful historic houses, lots of cafes and restaurants. During the year there are dozens of cultural events, festivals and festivals.
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St. Bartholomews Cathedral
The structure that really dominates Pilsen is the Cathedral of St. Bartholomew. Its building started together with foundation of the city and it was completed at the beginning of the 16th century. The cathedral is a national monument as well as housing the argillite statue on the main altar - the famous Pilsen Madonna.
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The Church of St. Nicholas
The Church of St. Nicholas stands at the place where a late 13th century Gothic temple once stood, which was reconstructed in the 16th century, but destroyed by the great fire of 1641.
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Grossmuenster
The Grossmünster church is a landmark of Zurich. According to legend, Charlemagne discovered the graves of the city’s patron saints Felix and Regula and had a church built as a monastery on the spot. In the first half of the 16th century, the Grossmünster church was the starting point of the Swiss-German Reformation led by Huldrych Zwingli and Heinrich Bullinger. The theological college then annexed to the monastery spawned what is now the University of Zürich. The stained glass windows by Sigmar Polke, the Romanesque crypt, choir windows by Augusto Giacometti, bronze doors by Otto Münch and the cloister Reformation Museum are just some of the highlights see here.
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Minster of Our Lady Church
Known to Zurchers as the Fraumunster, the Minster of Our Lady church is popular to visit thanks to its graceful spire (which tops Zurich's skyline) and its Marc Chagall stained-glass windows. The church was founded in the ninth century by Emperor Ludwig, Charlemagne's grandson, though the property's iconic spire wasn't added until 1732. And in 1970, Chagall's famous stained-glass windows were added. Some previous visitors said the church's exterior isn't much to look at. However, most agree the interior's stained-glass windows are well worth a visit. In addition to the newer Chagall windows, some featuring designs by Augusto Giacometti, who is famously linked to the stained-glass windows at the Great Minster, are also located inside.
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Svata Hora
Baroque complex Svatá Hora (Holy Hill), the prominent Marian pilgrimage site of Czech Lands with central Basilica of the Assumption of Virgin Mary, is also an outstanding cultural, architectonic and historic monument of the country.
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Church of St. Mary Magdalene
The Roman Catholic Cathedral of St. Mary Magdalene is located in the very heart of the Karlovy Vary spa area, in the close proximity of the Hot Spring. The church bears the hallmarks of the High Baroque architecture and it is one of the most important Baroque monuments not only in Karlovy Vary, but in the entire Czech Republic.
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Russian Church
A glistening golden dome is the hallmark of this Byzantine-styled church, which should definitely be included on your tour of the town. Vladimir Potemkin and Bernhard Belzer built this spectacular structure between 1880 – 1882.
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Klagenfurt Cathedral & Cathedral Square
Commissioned by the territorial estates as a Protestant church in 1578, it was designed by architect Christoph Windisch. Klagenfurt Cathedral is the oldest pilaster church in Austria. The 23 paintings on the walls and ceilings were painted over several times in the course of the years. The Catholic Reformation Commission closed the cathedral in the year 1600. Four years later it was handed over to the Jesuits who managed the Jesuit school next door until the order was closed in 1773. A fire destroyed major parts of the church in the year 1723. Reconstruction did not begin until 1725. The Carinthian Baroque painter Josef Ferdinand Fromiller created the John of Nepomuk apotheosis. The church was raised to Cathedral status in 1787. The Cathedral was renovated in the 1890s and shines today in the lustrous Baroque colourfulness of the 18th century.
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The basilica of St Peter and Alexander
The basilica dates back to the days of Duke Liudolf of Swabia in the 10th century and is the only church in the world dedicated to Saint Peter and Saint Alexander. In 982 Aschaffenburg – and therefore the former abbey – was incorporated into Mainz and the church and monastic college came to be a dominant factor in the Mainz archbishop's choice of residence.
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Baroque palace Mannheim
The imposing baroque palace with its impressive size is not without reason the largest Baroque palace in Germany. Stroll across the wide Ehrenhof, be impressed in the former State Rooms and the Castle Church or enjoy the student bustle of the University of Mannheim, which is located in the castle.
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Old Town Hall and St. Sebastian Church
The baroque backdrop for the market held here three times a week is formed by the ensemble of the old town hall and the parish church of St. Sebastian - which is incidentally Mannheim's oldest building. If you happen to lose track of time in the hustle and bustle of the market, two clocks and a bell tower are on hand to bring you back to the here and now. What's more, a glockenspiel sounds from the tower three times a day, charming more people than merely the wedding couple exchanging vows inside the walls. You can immerse yourself in Mannheim's internationality directly behind the marketplace. The predominantly Turkish-influenced district with its small shops and delicacies like baklava and pide can easily turn your thoughts to your next holiday. The huge selection of bridal and evening wear on offer here draws customers from over 150 kilometers away.
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Christ Church
The Protestant Christuskirche alone impresses with its size - its round dome can be seen from afar and even towers over the nearby water tower. With its neo-baroque, magnificent exterior, it adapts to the surrounding villa district in the eastern part of the city - the Protestant church completed in 1911 is considered to be the most representative sacral building in Mannheim.
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Freiburg Minster
Every visitor who comes to Freiburg always heads straight to the cathedral as soon as he catches a glimpse of the open-worked pyramids of the slender tower over the rooftops of the old town.
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The cathedral of Notre-Dame
A prodigy of the gigantesque and the delicate," as Victor Hugo claimed. Strasbourg Cathedral (1015-1439) is an absolute masterpiece of Gothic art. The 142 m high spire looks incredibly lightweight and made the Cathedral the highest edifice in all Christianity until the 19th century.
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St Peters Cathedral
Romanesque pillar basilica with a double choir and a transept, built 1125/1130 – 1181 on the foundations of a structure erected by Bishop Burchard (1000 – 1025). Elaborate decorations in the east and west choirs.
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St.Martinskirche Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic church of St. Martinskirche is one of the famous church in the city if Olten.
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The Cathedral of Vicenza
The construction of the apse in the Cathedral of Vicenza had begun in 1482 to the design of Lorenzo da Bologna, but in 1531 it was still unfinished. Early, temporary, roofing was erected in 1540, as a result of the possibility that Vicenza might host the Church Council which in the end was held at Trent.
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Church Saints Peter and Paul
The belfry with its gable roof, rebuilt in gothic style in 1220, is now the only surviving part of the original Roman church. As the nave of the earlier church was delapidated and had become too small, it was demolisched in 1807 and replaced by the present vast nave, built in the "barn" style in 1808 and 1809.