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Churches in Budapest

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Hungary
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St. Stephen s Basilica
St. Stephen’s Basilica is the largest church in Budapest and can hold up to 8,500 people. Although in architectural terms it’s a cathedral, it was given the title of ‘basilica minor’ by Pope Pius XI in 1931. It took more than 50 years to build the Basilica. Building commenced in 1851, and the inauguration ceremony took place in 1906 and was attended by Emperor Franz Joseph. During its construction, in 1868 the dome collapsed and rebuilding it had to start almost from scratch, which explains the delay in the Basilica's completion. Architect Jozsef Hild who drafted the original plans and supervised the construction died in 1867. Miklós Ybl, one of Europe's leading architects in the mid to late 19th century, who also designed the Opera House, took over. When the dome collapsed in 1868, Ybl had to draft new plans. Unfortunately Ybl didn’t live to see the completion of the Basilica as he passed away in 1891, however work was finished according to his plans. Originally designed in neo-classical style by Hild, the Basilica was finished in neo-renaissance style based on the plans of Ybl. The dome is 96 meters high, the exact same height as the Budapest Parliament Building. In fact current building regulations stipulate that no other structure in Budapest can be taller than 96 meters. Having the same height as the Parliament also symbolizes the balance between church and state in Hungary.
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Matthias Church
The historic Matthias Church (Mátyás-templom) is over 700 years old. The church was the scene of several coronations, including that of Charles IV in 1916, the last Habsburg king.
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Lutheran Church
Let 'us go towards the main square again. About 100 meters away on your right in Arany János Street you can find the Lutheran Church built in the 19th century. Until the end of the 1980s Miklós Ybl’s masterpiece, decorated with Romanesque motives, was hidden by cheap stores; today it can be seen in its original beauty.
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Big Catholic Church
Let's start our walk in the main square of the "Famous Town" that used to be the market-place for centuries. Here you can find the Big Catholic Church which is the largest cathedral in the Great Hungarian Plain built in the style of the age of Louis XVI of France. Looking down from the 73 meter tall tower you can see the panorama of the town.
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The Blue Church
Officially known as the Church of St Elizabeth of Hungary, but commonly referred to simply as ‘the Blue Church’ for obvious reasons, this is Bratislava’s most appealing art nouveau building. Its style, sometimes known as Hungarian Secession, is repeated in the nearby grammar school on Grösslingová Street. Both were designed by Budapest architect Edmund Lechner and built in the early twentieth century (the church was consecrated on 11 October, 1913). Both the interior and exterior of the church are painted in shades of pale blue and decorated with blue majolica; even the roof is tiled with blue-glazed ceramics. The structure incorporates a 36.8-metre round tower.
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St. Martin's Cathedral
A three-nave Gothic church from the 15th century and the former coronation church. A gilded replica of the coronation crown fixed on the top of the cathedral tower at a height of 85 metres and weighing 150 kg reminds of this glorious age.
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The Reformed Great Church
The Reformed Great Church of Debrecen is one of the most significant Classicist historic buildings of Hungary. It was designed by Mihály Péchy, and built between 1805 and 1822. Its north-south nave (with the organs at its two ends and with the pulpit at its north end) is 38 m long and 14 m wide; its east-west aisle is 55 m long and 15 m wide.
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St. Anne's Cathedral
Built in Baroque and Louis Seize style, the church was elevated to cathedral rank by Pope John Paul II in 1993. A certified replica of the Turin Shroud has been on display in the building since 2011. 2015 has been designated as Catholic Memorial Year, to mark the tercentenary of the movement started to reorganize practices and activities of the Catholic faithful in Debrecen.
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Haydn Church
The pilgrim church "Visitation" was built between 1715 and 1803 according to plans drawn up by Prince Paul I. Esterházy. Unfortunately, the prince did not live to see the groundbreaking ceremony as he died from the plague in 1713. The portion of the church that can be visited today represents merely the presbytery of the church originally planned. It was to be a place of worship of enormous proportions. The high altar picture "The Visitation" is a copy of a painting by Dorffmeister and dates back to 1797.
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The Calvary
The famous Calvary at the Haydn church was built by the Franciscan lay brother Felix Niering in the years from 1701 – 1707. The Calvary in Eisenstadt follows the pattern of the Calvary in Maria Lanzendorf in Lower Austria. Steps and dark hallways lead through an artificial mountain made of rocks and pass by small niches, grottos and tiny chapels portraying scenes of the Passion of Christ. At the east side of the Calvary, there is the Chapel of Mercy. It contains a miraculous image that is visited by many pilgrims every year. The Chapel of Mercy already forms part of the Calvary. Originally it had been built as Mount of Olives Chapel. After the Statue of Mercy had been transferred from the church in Grosshöflein the chapel was re-consecrated as Chapel of Mercy.
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Bezdin Monastery
The Bezdin Monastery is a monastery dedicated to the Assumption, located in Lunca Muresului Natural Park, near the village Munar, Arad County, on the right bank of the river Mures. The monastery was founded in 1539, the name comes from the Bezdin lake located in the eastern part of the monastery. During the Ottoman occupation, the monastery was burned by the ottomans, and in 1690 a brick church was built in Byzantine style as a form of clover with three abisade. Inside the church is a miraculous icon of Our Lady, brought from Mount Athos.
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St. Stephen Cathedral
St. Stephen's Cathedral is the symbol of Vienna. Construction commenced in the 12th century. Today, it is one of the most important Gothic structures in Austria. St. Stephen's Cathedral is 107.2 meters long and 34.2 meters wide. It has four towers. The tallest of these is the south tower at 136.44 meters. The tower room, from which there is a gigantic view across Vienna, is reached via 343 steps. A total of 13 bells hang here. However, the best-known bell of St. Stephen's Cathedral, the Pummerin, is located in the 68.3 meter-tall north tower. It is the second-biggest free-swinging chimed church bell in Europe. On the roof of St. Stephen's Cathedral, colorful roof tiles were laid to create the Royal and Imperial double-headed eagle and the coat of arms of the city of Vienna. The interior of St. Stephen's Cathedral was changed again and again over the centuries, right through to the Baroque period.
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The Co-cathedral Church
The Church of St. Peter and St. Paul is the co-cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Đakovo-Osijek. A co-cathedral is a cathedral church which shares the function of being a bishop’s seat, or cathedral, with another cathedral, often in another city.
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The Holy Trinity Orthodox Church
This is one of many places of worship that were declared historical monuments and it can be visited on 5 Parcul Traian Street. Its troubled history had an influence on whom to choose as a patron saint and how its interior developed, since it was used consecutively by priests and believers of three denominations – Roman-Catholic, Ruthenian (Greek-Catholic) and, at present, Orthodox Christians.
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The Red Church
The Red Church is a historical and architectural monument of the Arad city. The building serves as a place of worship of the Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Romania. The name comes from the external finish of polished brick. The church is built in 1906 in Gothic style, with the main tower of 46 meters and a Gothic-style stained glass. At the inauguration, the church had three bells in weight 1590 kg. During World War I, from the disposal of the authorities have been melted two bells, from their bronze were made projectiles. The bells were cast in the foundry workshop Hönig from Arad, famous for bronze casting work.
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Cathedral Birth of St. John the Baptist
The Cathedral "Birth of St. John the Baptist" is a monument of baroque architecture in the Arad city. The building was built between 1862-1865. The main funders of construction were family Mocioni and banker Gheorghe Sina. The two towers of the facade were raised in 1904. The two towers are provided with a clock on each side. The church served as the cathedral of the Diocese Arad until 2009, when Holy Trinity Cathedral in Arad, built since 1991, has acquired this feature.
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St Stephan
The Tulln parish church is around 1,000 years old and was among the early parish churches to be established by the Babenbergs. The charter from Emperor Heinrich II dates back to 1014. The church combines multiple architectural styles. An Ottonian Romanesque core is juxtaposed with a Gothic chancel and Baroque towers and a Baroque interior. Of particular historical note is the Romanesque west portal, known as the Apostles’ Gate. The marble altar and the magnificent choir stalls are also features of the church that visitors will not want to miss. The two towers are signs of the church visible from far and wide. They have an interesting story. The south tower belongs to the parish whereas the north one is owned by the city of Tulln. In earlier times, the tower watchman had his lookout and abode in the city tower. His job was to ring the bells to warn citizens if a fire broke out within city limits.
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Basilica Maria Radna
In 1642 Pater Andrija Stipancic, an observant franciscan monk from the “Bosna Argentina” province and priest at Radna, succeeds, after a long pilgrimage on foot made to Istambul and back, to obtain an Embre from the sultan for the renovation of his chapel.
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St. Mary and St. Nepomuk Monument
The monument has two names – both used: “St. Mary monument” and “St. Nepomuk monument". Both are (and were) correct, but could cause confusion: there was another “Mary”, quite famous, and it is in the namesake square from Iosefin, and there is also another Nepomuk near the Millennium Church in Fabric.
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Dub nad Moravou
Dub nad Moravou and the pilgrimage temple of the Purge of the Virgin Mary, which is dominated by the whole of Haná. The first mention of this Haná town is from 1141, when the settlement is mentioned as the property of the Olomouc capital church.
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Cathedral of St. Peter and Paul
Once a small Romanesque Basilica on Petrov Hill, later rebuilt in the Gothic style, the cathedral was built in 1777 after the Brno bishopric was created. Now its two tall towers, together with Špilberk Castle , form the characteristic silhouette of the city of Brno. In addition to the interior, the Romanesque-Gothic crypt and view from the two towers are a must. The Diocesan Museum and Information Centre is located nearby. The noon ringing at 11 o’clock is part of the legend of the Swedish siege during the Thirty Years War.
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St. Michaels Church
The three domes of the St. Michael’s Church are one of the most distinctive landmarks of the city. This Baroque church was rebuilt from the original Gothic church and was consecrated probably in 1251.
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Olomouc castle
You simply should not miss the Olomouc castle site situated on the Wenceslas Hill! Right here in 1306, the last Přemyslid, the Czech king Wenceslas III, was assassinated. You can admire the Bishop's Palace with its famous Romanesque windows, the gothic St. Wenceslas Cathedral, today the seat of the Archbishop of Olomouc, or the Archdiocesan Museum founded on the initiative of Pope John Paul II.
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St.Polten Former Synagogue
The only Art Nouveau synagogue in Lower Austria. Rich painting in ornamental forms of the Wiener Werkstätte. Built in 1913 according to the plans of the architects Theodor Schreier and Viktor Postelberg, the synagogue was badly damaged in the Kristallnacht (9th / 9th November 1938). After 1945, the building was returned to the IKG Vienna - an IKG St. Pölten no longer existed. The once thriving Jewish community life in St. Pölten was completely destroyed, only a few survivors returned to St. Pölten. Since 1988, the Kantorhaus houses the Institute for Jewish History in Austria, which uses the synagogue room for events.Today, the former synagogue is a memorial site that commemorates a living Jewish community before 1938 and its destruction by the Nazis.
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Piarist Church Krems
This Roman Catholic church is the oldest in Krems and was constructed around 1284. The late-Gothic hall church is stylistically related to the Vienna Dombauhütte and is therefore also referred to as the "little sister" of St. Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna. Inside, the steep Gothic church with its profiled pillars, services, capitals and many other craftsmanship highlights of Gothic architecture impresses. The baroque high altar was built according to plans by Joseph Maria Götz . The altarpiece is by Martin Johann Schmidt , it is called 1756 and shows the Assumption of Mary. The watchtower, which was built in the east, has been owned by the city since 1616. It was the seat of the city turret and was inhabited until a few decades ago. Opposite the church portal leads the 2004 completely renovated covered Piaristenstiege to Pfarrplatz.
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Dominican Church and Monastery
1236 received the Dominicans of Duke Leopold VI. the order to set up a branch in Krems an der Donau. At about the same time, the Minorites were called to Stein. As early as 1240, the construction of a church was begun , which was vaulted around 1265. It was then built outside the city walls, the so-called Predigertor led through the city wall to Passauerhof with the Ursula chapel. The chancel of the church dates back to 1330. The impressive sacred space was initially painted colorful, well-preserved remains of which can still be seen today. The monastery and the church were one of the largest and most representative meeting rooms in the country at the time of construction , serving as a meeting place for the regional parliaments and for meetings of the handicraft mints of the region. The monastery itself was built in the Baroque style and the Gothic cloister was overgrown. A partial reconstruction in the eastern area of ​​the courtyard refers to the disappearance of the gothic colonnade of the complex.
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The Cathedral Graz
Royal-imperial church architecture is crowning the historic city centre. The cathedral is definitely not to be missed on any sightseeing trip round Graz. Don’t be fooled by the relatively restrained exterior. The "Gottesplagenbild", an inspiring relic of splendid Gothic fresco painting, is still in excellent condition today. Inside the cathedral, a multitude of ecclesiastical along with general historical treasures is waiting to be discovered. Today's cathedral reminds of the days when Graz was an imperial city. Emperor Frederick III erected the church together with his new residence in Graz. In the course of history, the cathedral saw many changes. Construction work of the court and parish church in late-Gothic style was started in 1438, as Jesuit church it was refurbished in Baroque style in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Since 1786 it has been the cathedral, i.e. the bishop's and main church of the Catholics in Styria. The exterior of the cathedral looks very sober today. In the Gothic period, however, the façades were covered with paintings. One fresco has been preserved - the so-called Gottesplagenbild ("God's Plagues").
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The Wawel Cathedral
It’s Poland’s Westminster Cathedral, the absolute focal point of the country’s religious history, crowning place of kings and queens and architectural overseer of the famous Cracovian gothic skyline. Wawel Cathedral sits in the heart of the royal palace and castle complex that dominates the hill of the same name, on the south side of Krakow’s old town.
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St. Marys Basilica
Keeping watch over Europe’s second largest market square for the last seven centuries, the imposing Gothic spires of St. Mary’s Basilica have become a veritable symbol of Kraków itself and a focal point in the stories that make up the city’s mythic and historical past.
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Cathedral of Zagreb
Zagreb Cathedral was formerly known as St. Stephen’s Cathedral. Today, the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary is dedicated to the Assumption of Mary and to kings Saint Stephen and Saint Ladislaus. Once you get to Kaptol Square you will see it is dominated by Zagreb cathedral which has been there since the 11th century. The Archbishop’s Palace encloses it from three sides, and because of its twin 108 meters (354 ft) high spires, it is the tallest building in Croatia. It literally soars over the city. The Zagreb Cathedral must be seen and its sacristy is of great architectural value. What you will see today does not represent the original construction. The first Cathedral was damaged during the Tartar attack and a great fire in the 13th century. Finally, it was severely damaged by the 1880 earthquake and was restored in the Neo-Gothic style by Hermann Bollé, the cathedral you see today.
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Saint Mark's Church
Saint Mark’s Church is Zagreb’s iconic building due to its signature colourful tiled roof. It is one of the oldest buildings in Zagreb dating from the 13th century. You will notice the Southern portal. It is equally important as it is the richest looking gothic portal in Croatia. The portal consists of 15 sculptures (11 stone gothic sculptures and 4 wooden baroque sculptures) in 11 niches. Sculptures present Virgin Mary with the Child, Christ, St. Mark and the apostles. Saint Mark’s uniquely colourful tiled roof was constructed in 1880 by Friedrich Schmidt and Herman Bollé. On it, you will see the medieval coat of arms of Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia on the left side, and the emblem of Zagreb on the right. On the other hand, inside, you will see sculptures by Ivan Meštrović and art by Jozo Kljaković and Ljubo Babić. Eventually, the frescos were renovated, the ceiling was gilded with 22-carat gold leaflets and a new organ has been recently installed.
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Katowice St. Mary's Church
Katowice's oldest existing Catholic parish church was built from Silesian dolomite, not the usual red brick, between 1862 and 1870 to a design by the famous Breslau (Wrocław) architect Alexis Langer. Originally planned on a far grander scale than it was eventually built, the 43m-long, 31m-wide neo-Gothic building features an eye-catching, trademark Langer 71m octagonal tower and a feast of good things inside. The altar in the transept supposedly dates from the 15th century, whilst the wonderful stained glass windows on either side of the nave representing sin and virtue are the work of Adam Bunsch (1896-1969). The Chapel of the Holy Sacrament includes a likeness of Father Emil Szramek in traditional Silesian dress. Szramek was the parish priest from 1926 until his arrest by the Gestapo in April 1940. Sent to a number of concentration camps including Dachau, where he quickly became a spiritual leader for other incarcerated Silesian priests, he was murdered on January 13, 1942.
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Church of St. Anthony of Padua
The conventuals (black friars) settled in Poznań in the 17th c. The church was commissioned from Jan Koński and built atop Castle Hill (presently Przemysł Hill) in the years 1674-1757. The monastery was erected in the years 1672-1749 east of the church but it was partly dismantled after the suppression of the order in 1834; only the north part survived to the present day.
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The reformed church
The reformed church (Luther) – built in 1912, the church holds an altar painted by Iványi Grünwald Béla, one of the most important representatives of the Baia Mare Painting School. Address: Str. Lucaciu Vasile, nr. 18.
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Holy Trinity Cathedral
The Holy Trinity - the roman-catholic cathedral was built in 1766 by Jesuits on the place of former St. Martin church. The cathedral holds an organ with three registers, built between 1940-1944. The cathedral, which is the perspective head of the Unirii Boulevard in Baia Mare, is an impressive building, representative for the construction of churches in Transylvania, built in the tradition of Orthodox churches, with dimensions of 85 m long, 50 m wide and 85 m high. The cathedral capacity is about 3000 people. From the first level, being plated with brick from Oradea, paved on the floor with porcelain stoneware from Spain and iconostasis made of brick with icons in Murano mosaic. Spacious altar, sf. brick table with a marble plate 2 / 1,50m, gr. 5cm., Oak furniture, wrought iron chandeliers. Twelve columns supporting the central dome and main nave. In the back of the church there is a large Byzantine Hall, where there are exhibitions of icons, two offices and four warehouses. Considering the large influx of believers who frequent this cathedral, the access and exit is made on two doors and two monumental stairs, and at the exit there are two places to light candles.