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Beaches in Tahiti

Countries:

French Polynesia
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Teahupoo
Tahiti is known for having one of the most dangerous surf breaks in the world, Teahupo’o. Its waves are big and powerful, and it breaks right onto the razor sharp reef. Tahiti’s best waves occur during the winter months of May to October.
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Maui Beach
Maui Beach is a rare white sand beach in Tahiti. It can get very crowded on weekends, but is peaceful during weekdays. It located right on the road but has shallow swimming, making it perfect for kids, as well as deeper spots for adults and some DIY snorkeling off the reef.
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Opunohu Bay
Opunohu Bay, Moorea, French Polynesia. Moorea is one of the most beautiful islands in Pacific.
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Bora Bora Lagoonarium
Don’t miss this fantastic opportunity to get up close and personal with a variety of sea life at the Lagoonarium Bora Bora. Let tropical fish surround you while sharks and rays float by your feet. The sea life is well fed and relatively harmless. Giant Rays are like little puppies as they come up to wanting to be fed little treats. A visit to the Lagoonarium in Bora Bora can arrange via your travel agent or book through your hotel. A beautiful picnic feast prepared before your eyes come with the excursion. So once you’ve had enough swimming with the sea life, you head over to the picnic area and beach. The staff is very friendly and if you are afraid to enter the water they will do their best to show you it’s harmless.
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Matira Beach
Matira Beach is a mile of exquisite white sand at the southern tip of Bora Bora Island. When you visit, you will understand why it is Bora Bora's most popular public beach. It stretches from Hotel Bora Bora (currently closed for renovations) to Matira Point and is framed from behind by lush palms and green hills. To each side, there are more long strips of privately owned beaches. Often described as the most beautiful beach in the world, Matira Beach is actually the only public beach on the main island that is worth a visit. It is so gorgeous that it is in our list of the best things to do in Bora Bora! Everybody is welcome on this expanse of sand. There is a fun atmosphere that offers natural shade from palm trees, safe swimming and easy snorkelling.
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Ninamu Resort
The Ninamu Resort is hidden away on a private island in the southwest corner of Tikehau, just ten minutes by boat from the airport. Surrounded by pink sand beaches, abundant marine life, impeccable waves and prevailing trade winds, this secluded retreat is the ultimate paradise for every type of water sports enthusiast.
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Tikehau Pearl Beach Resort
The Tikehau Pearl Beach Resort can be found on a secluded, pink beach fringed with palm trees at the southeast end of the atoll. Located fifteen minutes by boat from the airport and the main village of Tuherahera, this hotel serves as the ideal home base for any and all leisurely activities including kayaking, snorkeling and biking. It even has its own dive center on site, making it easy to arrange your daily excursions.
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Bird Island
Venture across the lagoon with your guide to the tiny islet known as Bird Island. This bird watcher`s paradise provides the opportunity to view many unique avian species in their natural island habitat.
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The Blue Lagoon
Experience one of the most popular attractions in Rangiroa. The Blue Lagoon is a natural pool formed by a string of islets and coral reefs on the edge of the main reef - a lagoon within a lagoon.
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The Pink Sand Beach
The Pink Sand Beach, located at the extreme southeast part of Rangiroa, is worth seeing both for the destination and for the route leading to it. Your adventure begins with a boat trip of about two hours with the ocean and an endless sky as your backdrop.
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Kia Ora Resort and Spa
The Hotel Kia Ora Resort & Spa is located on the northern stretch of Rangiroa near the Tiputa Pass. Surrounded by a coconut plantation, the resort combines this convenient setting with a hidden seclusion. The architecture is elegant and refined, resting in perfect harmony with the natural environment.
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Hanatekuua Beach
You’ll be thanking whoever made the smart decision to come to Hiva Oa when you see Hanatekuua for the first time. This dream of a beach seems to be caressed by the palms of a giant hand.
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Matakana Coast
Pick up fresh local and organic produce at the Matakana Farmers’ Market on Saturdays. Browse the art and craft galleries and find everything from paintings by local artists to the renowned Morris & James Pottery.Visit some of the beautiful white-sand beaches along Matakana’s stunning coastline.
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Ahu Tongariki
With 15 gigantic stone-carved moai lined up on a 200-foot-long platform and a remote location framed by the looming Rano Raraku volcano and the crashing ocean, Ahu Tongariki is nothing short of spectacular. For many visitors, this is the star attraction of Easter Island, and looking up at the towering figures, the largest of which stands 14 meters tall, it’s hard not to be in awe of the Rapa Nui people, who achieved the seemingly impossible feat of carving and moving the 30-ton stone boulders to their waterfront perch. Ahu Tongariki is the largest ceremonial site ever made on the island, featuring the largest number of moai ever erected on a single site, and each statue is unique, with only one featuring the iconic red-rock “pukao,” or ceremonial headdress. Even more astounding, considering the size and weight of the statues, is that the site was almost completely destroyed by a tsunami in 1960, with the rocks flung more than 90 meters inland. The ahu has since been painstakingly restored, a project that took Chilean archaeologists Claudio Cristino and Patricia Vargas five years and was finally completed in 1995. Read more about Best Ahu Tongariki Tours, Trips & Admission Tickets - Easter Island - https://www.viator.com/en-AU/Easter-Island-attractions/Ahu-Tongariki/d306-a15083?mcid=56757
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Hanauma Bay
Every year, more than a million people get to swim with the fishes in a marine ecosystem located on the southeast coast of Oahu, 10 miles east of Waikiki. Hanauma (or curved bay) Bay is a former volcanic crater that became a protected marine life conservation area in 1967. Since then, it’s become an underwater park for snorkel enthusiasts, swimmers and anyone desiring to see more than 400 species of Hawaiian fishes including Hawaii’s state fish the humuhumunukunukuapua‘a, turtles and other marine life. Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve is open year-round, except for Tuesdays, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Plan to arrive as early as you can or wait until the crowd trickles out in the mid-afternoon. During summer, the state park opens at 6 am and closes at 7 pm. It closes at 6 pm in winter.
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Anse Vata Bay
Formerly named the Duck Bay (like the island located just opposite) because of its swampy side, the Anse Vata neighbourhood now has the same name as the adjoining bay and the 2-kilometer long sandy beach bordering it. Located between the Lemon Bay (Baie des Citrons) and Val Plaisance, it is bounded by the “Rocher à la Voile” on the one hand and the Pointe Magnin on the other side. This South neighbourhood of Noumea, part of the living heart of the city, really looks like a real see side resort. There is a holiday atmosphere and this area is popular with tourists who find here all activities and infrastructure they need: shops, restaurants, water sports, most major resorts and two casinos ... all in one holiday setting at the edge of a wooded beach. Sea activities such as windsurfing are highly successful thanks to the exposure of the bay to the prevailing wind. Many sporting events also start from this place.
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Aramoana Beach
This beautiful white sandy beach is split by the Mole, a long breakwater stretching out into the harbour entrance. It's an exciting walk when the seas are big and a great spot to watch the albatrosses swooping into Taiaroa Head on the other side the harbour.
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Lake Hawea
An easy, scenic 15 minute drive from Wanaka and on the road to Makarora and the West Coast, is Lake Hawea. A place of vivid beauty, mountainous extremes and legendary fishing spots. Lake Hawea is an outdoor adventurers’ paradise and a great place to boat, swim, kite surf, kayak, ride, walk or just laze about on the beach. From Lake Hawea township you can find an excellent walk by following Timaru River Road to Timaru Creek, a picnic and camping area. The trail that begins here leads through a valley of beech forest until it flattens onto a braided river bed. With magnificent views of the surrounding peaks, and a lake to cool off, Lake Hawea offers a welcome respite from the long hot months of summer.
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Snapper Rocks
Snapper Rocks is a small rocky outcrop on the northern side of Point Danger at the southern end of Rainbow Bay on the Gold Coast. Snapper is a point break forming the first part of the man-made Superbank which extends from Snapper Rocks Point, through Rainbow Bay, Greenmount Point, Coolangatta Beach, and Kirra, for a distance of around two kilometres. The Superbank is now renowned as one of the most consistent breaks in Queensland and plays host to the annual World Surf Leagues’ Quiksilver and Roxy Pros. Multiple barrel sections can now occur at any point along this length. The quality of the surf has markedly improved since the 1990s, and is now of legendary quality, creating one of the longest, hollowest and best waves in the world. The Rainbow Bay Surf Club is the best place to view the break while enjoying a relaxed meal.
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Frenchmans Beach
In the late 19th Century, four men sailed west from the French-speaking South Pacific islands. They landed on this beach, which was named after them. The four men, Jack Newfong, John Lifu, George Fenoch and Richard Martin, were taken to the Myora/Moongalba Mission, where they ended up settling. Descendants of these four men still live on North Stradbroke Island. Frenchman’s Beach faces due east, receiving little protection from the prevailing south-east waves. The beach is 500m long and is backed by steep, densely vegetated bluffs, access to the beach is either around Dune Rocks from Deadmans Beach, or down a signed steep walking track from the main road. The beach receives waves averaging between 1 and 1.5m, which maintain an inner bar usually cut by two rips, including a permanent rip against Dune Rocks.
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Cylinder Beach
Cylinder Beach is a picturesque cove between Cylinder and Home Beach Headlands. It is popular with families because it is easily accessible with a carpark situated only metres from the beach. The waves at Cylinder are often smaller and therefore it is perfect for sunbathing and swimming during good weather conditions. However, during strong southerly winds, there is a side sweep which may carry you parallel to the beach. Cylinder Beach is also a favourite with surfers when the conditions are right. Lifeguards and lifesavers patrol this beach.
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Main Beach
While other suburbs snatch their names from exotic Aboriginal meanings or English seaside villages, Main Beach is far more literal. Situated at the northern end of the Gold Coast, Main Beach was so named as it was the main surf beach to the town of Southport. But while its name may be obvious, its hidden gems are far more exciting for this is one of the coast’s areas which celebrates something old and something new in style. A highlight of a visit here is to the beach itself, where the old bathing pavilion, Pavilion 34 to be precise, has been reincarnated as a casual beach café complete with chiko rolls, potato scallops, pineapple fritters and fish and chips. The old male and female change pavilions are still here and there’s loads of retro photos to remind you of the Main Beach of old. This bathing pavilion sits next to the Southport Surf Club, the first to make its mark on the Gold Coast in 1936 and right next to a sprawling shady park which is perfect for oceanfront picnics. Away from the beach - popular with surfers due to its open shore break - toddle down to Tedder Avenue. Sassy socialites and salty surfies rub shoulders here in this strip of modern cafes, exclusive restaurants, bars and boutiques. For more shopping and style, take a wander towards the Southport Spit – or simply The Spit - to locals.
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Flynns Beach
Flynns Beach, situated three kilometres south of Port Macquarie, is almost 500 metres long and nestled between a pair of rocky headlands to the north and south. It has good protection from westerly and southerly winds and suits learn-to-surfers most of the year. The Surf Club has a kiosk that serves meals. There is plenty of accommodation available within a short walk of Flynns Beach.
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Fraser Island
Say hello to Fraser Island - also known as the largest sand island in the world. You can gaze up at towering ancient trees in astonishing rainforests growing out of sand on this World Heritage-listed wonder, be amazed by the incredible sapphire blues and emeraldene greens in the stunning freshwater lakes and float down Eli Creek
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Lake Innes Nature Reserve
At Lake Innes Nature Reserve, near Port Macquarie, visitors can enjoy cycling, fishing, birdwatching, swimming, kayaking and learning about NSW convict settlement history. Whether you’re an eager history student or an outdoor adventurer, you’ll find plenty to do at Lake Innes Nature Reserve, not far from Port Macquarie. The reserve features a fascinating historic site set in gorgeous natural scenery with plenty of opportunities for hiking, cycling, birdwatching and water sport activities. Lake Innes lies at its heart and is a picturesque setting for the historically significant Innes Ruins, which is a great place to learn all about early settlement and convict history in NSW. You can book a tour of the ruins through the Port Macquarie Information Centre. The lake is also a gorgeous backdrop for picnicking, birdwatching, walking or cycling. Or, get out on the water by kayaking or canoeing across it or enjoying a splash of swimming in its tranquil waters or spot of fishing from Perch Hole. There’s an impressive array of wildlife to admire here too, including osprey, ducks and swans paddling on the lake and the kangaroos, wallabies and dingoes that can be seen throughout the reserve.
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Rainbow Beach
Rainbow Beach trends south-south west for 2.5 kilometres from the dolerite rocks at Middle Rock Point to the sedimentary rocks at Bonny Hills, The beach is backed by a foredune, then two kilometres long Duchess Gully Creek that drains across the southern end of beach, where it is called Little Vinegar Creek, linking with a second small creek. Ocean Drive skirts round the beach with access only available at Middle Rock, where there are no facilities, while Bonny Hills has the surf club, a park and picnic area, and two caravan parks. Rainbow Beach is patrolled during school holidays October through April.
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Grants Beach
Grants (North Haven) Beach is located on the north side of the Camden Haven River mouth. The southern end is protected by the break wall which offers great 'right-handers' with a southerly swell. The beach is home to the Camden Haven Surf Lifesaving Club, who patrol the beach throughout the summer weekends. Dogs are allowed north of the patrolled area. The beach runs north-south for about 3.5 kilometres and is paralleled by a lovely walking track through the littoral forest and heathland. The beach is patrolled by council lifeguards and the Camden Haven Surf Club during school holidays. There are showers, toilets, and picnic tables at the southern end.
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Harrington Beach
Harrington Beach stretches from Harrington village to the picturesque fishing village of Crowdy Head, and is part of the Harrington Beach State Park. This quiet beach location between the two villages is ideal for relaxing strolls and fishing opportunities. Harrington break wall is a very popular spot for fishing, walking, and taking in the views of the ocean. There is a fish cleaning facility conveniently located at the beginning of the break wall. The Harrington Lagoon is located off the beach area; it is a safe swimming spot for families and is very popular during the warmer months. Car parking is available at the lagoon area off Crowdy Road.
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Harrington Beach State Park
Harrington Beach State Park is situated on the New South Wales Mid North Coast and comprises lands surrounding and including the Manning River's northern entrance. The 431 hectare site stretches from Harrington to the picturesque fishing village of Crowdy Head. The foreshores of the coastal beaches and estuary provide an array of year round recreation and tourism opportunities. The State Park also includes a small littoral rainforest that is accessible to the public.
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Palm Beach
There's a reason that Palm Beach doubles up as the setting for Summer Bay, the fictional beach in TV show Home & Away, the golden sand and sparkling blue sea make it look too good to be true. But there's more than just sea and sand here, explore Barrenjoey Head, Sydney’s northernmost seaside point and lots more. What makes Palm Beach, a narrow peninsular, so spectacular is its unbeatable location. It won nature's lottery and is surrounded by water on three sides: Pittwater to the west, the Pacific Ocean to the east, and Broken Bay to the north at the mouth of the Hawkesbury River, which meanders inland to historic Windsor. If you're planning on spending the day at Palmy, as the locals call it, bring your board because you'll enjoy excellent surf at the northern end of the beach. The southern end is more lo-fi, offering less active beachgoers a protected area for swimming in the ocean pool and pretty picnic spots under the pine trees.
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Ocean Beach Umina
Located between Umina Beach and Ettalong Beach at the southern end of the Central Coast and nestled within the protection of Broken Bay you will find over two kilometres of golden sand to relax on and enjoy. Ocean Beach provides the beauty of an ocean beach with the safety of an inland waterway, offering a perfect location for families. Picnic tables with seating are available, along with barbecue's and a children's playground. The beach is patrolled every day from October long weekend until the end of the April school holiday break. Public facilities are available as well as lovely grassed and under cover picnic areas.
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Long Reef Beach
Long Reef is a perfect stretch of white sand. At the north end there is Long Reef Headland, a protected aquatic reserve, and a golf course. A walk to the top of the headland can often be rewarded by views of migrating whales. There are offshore reefs in the north (the Long Reef Bomboras) and beach breaks running the entire 1.6 kilometres south to Dee Why and, on weekdays there's every chance of getting a quality wave to yourself. The Long Reef Bomboras starts to break at one metre or so and in a big south swell can produce a beautiful wave up to five metres. Reliable sandbanks shape beach breaks that are great for beginners and intermediate surfers. North Long Reef is also a favourite for windsurfing and kitesurfing.
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Collaroy Beach
Collaroy has great swimming conditions and is excellent for beginner surfers. While advanced surfers are more likely to look at nearby wave-magnets such as Narrabeen and Long Reef, Collaroy does offer a considerable advantage in amenities for visitors. Collaroy Beach has a fully accessible beach reserve and playground complete with disabled toilets, accessible picnic areas, rockpool and paths. For those in a wheelchair, it has a freewheeler wheelchair that can go in the water, and a liberty swing.
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Freshwater Beach
Freshwater is part of the Manly-Freshwater National and World Surfing Reserve that recognises the historical, cultural and environmental values of famous surfing beaches. It is where Duke Kahanamoku held his famous 1915 surfing demonstration that popularised surfing in Australia. Freshwater has some pretty reasonable waves in the one to two-metre mark. It can be busy on a summers day with people learning to surf, and families sticking in groups. For less experienced surfers, the break at the middle-northern end of the beach is an ideal spot for you. More experienced surfers may not get the wave they’re looking for but you can try the southern end which can get pumping with the right swell.
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Manly Beach
You're spoilt for choice when it comes to Manly Beach. Whether you want to spread a towel out and enjoy the soft white sand all day, surf its waves or explore its depths while snorkelling or diving, there's something for everyone. For those that prefer to look at it, it also makes a great backdrop for picnics or walking and cycle tracks. Manly is where the world's first surfing contest was held in 1964, making it one of Australia's most famous beaches. The iconic beach curves from South Steyne to North Steyne and Queenscliff, where a submerged reef, or bombora, creates the waves that inspire the world's best surfers to travel to our shores.