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Art and Culture in Venice

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La Fenice Theatre
The Fenice Theatre is one of the best known not just in Venice but worldwide. It was designed in 1790 by Giannantonio Selva commissioned by a rich and famous drama company. The building was subject of criticism mainly for the positions (in saint Mark’s area, campo San Fantin) and for its Neoclassic style. During the centuries it has been stage for many world premiere of operas become part oh the history, Gioacchini, Rossini, Verdi and more Donizetti, Bellini, Stawinsky… All of them gave their best creation on the stage of this great theatre. The theatre itself has been spectator of the city life, he known the Serenissima Republic, Napoleon, the Austrian empire, the reign of Italy and the Italian Republic. Actually the theatre hosts an important Operas Season, an International Festival of Contemporary Music and the new year eve concert.
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Accademia Gallery Museum
The Accademia Museum (Gallerie dell'Accademia) is part of a complex including the church of Santa Maria della Carità, the homonymous Scuola Grande (the original entrance is now the main access to the museum) and the Monastery of the Canonici Lateranensi (the complex was in use until the beginning of the XIX century). The gallery take its name from the Accademia delle Belle Arti (Art Accademy) who opened the building and shared the sites until few years ago (2004). The operas preserved inside the Gallery are many and of inestimable value. Most of the painting comes from a period between the XIV and the XVIII century, the most important authors are Carpaccio, Bellini, Tintoretto, Tiziano. Also many sculptures and drawing can be admired, amongst them the vitruvian man by Leonardo da Vinci, exposed only few periods. Initially the museum was operating as didactic and restoration of art operas centre.
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Correr Museum
The Correr Museum offers a real opportunity to know the Art and History of Venice. In the Napoleonic wing that was during the 19th century house of kings and emperors with their impressive neoclassical rooms, we find an important collection of works of one of the greatest sculptors of that time, Antonio Canova (1757-1822). In this museum we can also visit the New Magistrates, "Procuratie Nuove", which were designed between 1552-1616 by the architect Vincenzo Scamozzi and where once the most important civic authorities of the Republic of Venice were housed. In these spacious rooms, currently there are collections that document various aspects of the city's history, such as public institutions, daily life, naval achievements and local festivals. On the second floor is the exhibition of the Art Collection covering the period from the beginning of Venetian painting to the 16th century; also here we can find other incomparable masterpieces.
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The Dogi Palace
The Dogi Palace represent the symbol and the hart of the political and administrative life of the Venetian Republic millenary history. In the halls of the palace the Doge and the council took all the decision about Venice and its life.
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The Praglia Abbey
As the abbey of Santa Giustina, to which was added in the fifteenth century, the Praglia Abbey has enjoyed various events. Founded in the eleventh century, it was built in fief by Emperor Frederick II in the thirteenth century. Subsequently independent, then in, and finally added to Santa Giustina until 1810 when Napoleon suppressed.
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Teatro Olimpico
The splendid Teatro Olimpico was Palladio’s greatest urban work, and one of his last. He began the project in 1580, the year of his death at the age of 72; it would be completed 5 years later by his student Vicenzo Scamozzi. It was the first covered theater in Europe, inspired by the theaters of antiquity.
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Basilica Palladiana
The magnificent bigger-than-life Basilica Palladiana is not a church at all and was only partially designed by Palladio. Beneath it stood a Gothic-style Palazzo della Ragione (Law Courts and Assembly Hall) that Palladio was commissioned to convert to a High Renaissance style befitting a flourishing late- 16th-century city under Venice’s benevolent patronage.
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Arena Roman Amphitheatre
Situated in Piazza Bra, the amphitheatre of Verona was built in the first half of the 1st century A.D. (between the end of Augustus‘ reign and the beginning of Claudius).
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The Old Town
The Old Town is where life started on what used to be an island secured by medieval walls. The city had seven gates, three of which have been preserved to this day: The Gate of St. Benedict, The Portica and The Gate of the Holy Cross. The first archeological traces of life date back to the Bronze Age, and the old city started developing in the 3rd century. The limited space conditioned the construction of narrow houses, narrow streets and small squares. It's an unique place to visit. The town clock and a small fountain are located on the main town square. The town clock once represented the tower on the south corner of the former town walls. Built in the 12th century, the tower was extended several times. The town clock with its Venetian lion, the symbol of Serenissima dating back to mid-19th century, was situated on the town gate fort near the Califfi Palace.
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Civic Museum Rovinj
Located in the baroque palace of the XVII / XVIII century of the Count Caliphs, the museum was founded in 1954 on the initiative of some artists of Rovinj. Their idea was to gather the rich cultural heritage of the city in a single exhibition space. The museum serves as a town gallery and exhibits its precious collection to the public in a permanent exhibition. In its half-century of life it has gathered a rich collection that includes sections of contemporary art, old masters, archaeological, ethnological, books, documents and photographs on the activities of the partisan battalion Pino Budicin and more. The Museum houses one of the most important collections of ancient masters in Croatia, in particular the Italian masters from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century. The Renaissance is represented through works by artists from the circle of Giovanni Bellini and Bonifacio de Pitatija (Adoration of the Magi), while the most important exponents of Baroque are Marco Ricci (On the road to Emmaus), Antonio Zanchi, Jerome Romanin, Nicola Grassi, the school of Guido Reni and Bernardo Strozzi and others.
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Tridentine Diocesan Museum
The home of the Tridentine Diocesan Museum is the Pretorio Palace, first Episcopal residence of the town, in the heart of Trento. The museum was founded in 1903, also the Early Christian St. Vigil Basilica and the exhibition in the Libera Palace in the district of Villa Lagarina belong to it. In the halls of the museum the artistic and cultural treasures (from the 11th - 19th century) can be admired, all of them come from the churches of the Trentino: paintings, wooden sculptures, winged altars, pictorial manuscripts, valuable specimens of goldsmith’s work, ancient art embroideries and Flemish tapestries. The museum also houses the treasury of the cathedral with the large processional casket of St. Vigil. The multimedia station shows the most important stages of the building of the cathedral in three-d. At one passage in the museum a gorgeous view on the near located cathedral can be enjoyed and the archaeological zone of Porta Veronesis can be visited. The museum is also responsible for the near located Early Christian Basilica of St. Vigil.
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The Pinacoteca Art Gallery
The Pinacoteca is located not far from The Due Torri (the Two Towers, symbols of Bologna), inside the former St. Ignatius Jesuit Novitiate, built in the second half of the 15th century house young men who were to join the Society of Jesus (Jesuit Order). Besides the Pinacoteca, the building is also the headquarters of the Accademia delle Belle Arti (Figurative Arts Academy) as well as the Historical Artistic and Ethno-anthropological Heritage Authority
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Chapel of St. Maria Formosa
It is one of the two chapels built in the 6th century as part of a large Benedictine abbey demolished in the 16th century. The floor and walls were decorated with mosaics, some of which are now in the Archaeological Museum of Istria. It was built in the style of Ravenna churches, the only difference being the use of stone instead of brick. Due to its dimensions, method of construction and good state of preservation, the Chapel represents an extraordinary architectural masterpiece of its time.
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Museum of Contemporary Art of Istria
The museum collects works of art created in the second half of last century until the latest work of recent artists. MCAI represents an open meeting place of multiculturalism and, above all, to be a leading cultural and art institution of Istrian artists.
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Archaeological Museum of Istria
By collecting stone monuments in the Temple of Augustus in 1802, marshal Marmont began the founding of the museum collection in Pula. However, the discovery of stone, ceramic and metal objects in Nesactium was the basis for founding the Museo Civico (City Museum) in Pula in 1902. After the seat of the “Società istriana di archeologia e storia patria” had been moved and with the transfer of the archaeological inventory from Poreč to Pula, the Museo Civico was integrated with the National collection (stone monuments) and the Poreč Regional Museum (Museo Provinciale) into one regional institution. Therefore, in 1925 the Museum of Istria (Il Regio Museo dell’Istria) was founded in the present-day museum building. In 1930 the museum opened its doors to visitors, and a guidebook in Italian was published. This exhibition, along with minor changes, was open for the public until the end of World War II, when many objects were transferred to Italy during the Anglo-American administration.
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Arena Amphitheater
The most famous and important monument, the starting and ending point of every sightseeing tour is the Amphitheater, popularly called the Arena of Pula, which was once the site of gladiator fights. It was built in the 1st century AD during the reign of Emperor Vespasian, at the same time as the magnificent Colosseum in Rome. The ground plan is elliptical, the longer axis measuring about 130 m and the shorter one about 100 m. Gladiator fights took place in the central flat area called the arena, while the spectators could sit on the stone tiers or stand in the gallery. It is believed that the Amphitheater could seat about 20,000 spectators. Local limestone was used for its construction. In the Middle Ages, it was the site of knights tournaments and fairs. Today, it is the venue for many different events – Pula Film Festival, various concerts, opera, ballet, sports competitions… since its capacity is about 5000 spectators.
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Croatian Walk of Fame
The Croatian Walk of Fame project in Opatija was launched in 2005 by the Apriori Communications agency as a symbolic tribute to all the people whose sporting, scientific, cultural or artistic endeavours have contributed significantly to the worldwide promotion of Croatia. Potential candidates for inclusion are nominated by the project's independent Nomination Board consisting of several noted public individuals. From the board's nominations, readers of the media sponsors then cast their vote to decide which two candidates (one living, one awarded posthumously) should have their stars included in the Croatian Walk of Fame.
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Villa Angiolina
Visit the Villa Angiolina, a former summer residence and today the seat of the Croatian Museum of Tourism. The museum hosts various exhibitions, workshops and projects that will explain to you why Opatija was a favourite destination for many historical figures. This is the building that certainly marked the beginning of the tourist epoch in the history of Opatija. Pending its building in 1844. (actually a reconstruction of an older building owned by baron Haller von Hallerxtein); Opatija was a relatively large settlement with about 120 houses, clustered mainly around plots further away from the sea coast and chiefly oriented towards fishing and seafaring. With the arrival of Iginio Scarpa, a patrician from Rijeka, and building of his summer house Angiolina (named after Scarpa’s then already deceased wife, originating from the Sartori family), Opatija opened her doors to a whole line of guests and passengers, among whom it is noteworthy to mention the Austrian empress Mary Ann, the botanist Heinrich Noë, the croatian ban Josip Jelačić and others who in their enthusiasm for the local vegetation and climate spread the fame about Opatija and thus prepared the ground for the future health resort.
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Open Air Theatre
Opatija, this jewel of the Adriatic Sea, with its tradition in tourism of more than 160 years is one of the best known destinations in Croatia. Situated on the eastern rim of the Mediterranean basin, on the coast of the Kvarner Bay, at the foot of the Učka Mountain slopes
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Teatro Grande
The current auditorium of Teatro Grande was designed by architect Luigi Canonica and built in 1810. Girolamo Magnani decorated it in 1862.
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Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art Rijeka
The museum has its roots in the Fine Arts Gallery built in 1948. Six years later, in 1954, the 1954 Salon was founded - the Exhibition of Contemporary Sculpture and Painting in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY). This was the first group exhibition of the modern fine arts production of the former state. In 1960 it started the Biennale of Young Artists and in 1968 it presented the International Exhibition of Original Drawings. Since 1990 it has been presenting Croatian artists at the European and Mediterranean Biennale of Young Artists. In 1962 the institution changed its name to the Rijeka Modern Gallery and in 2003 to the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art. The Museum is working on a number of collections. These are collections of works by national artists Božidar Rašica, Romolo Venucci and Slavko Grčko, as well as collections of drawings, graphics, sculptures, posters, paintings, photographs and media art. The exhibition activities take place in Krešimirova Street.
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Korzo
Rijeka is reflected in Korzo, at Korzo you can read Rijeka. Anyone who, at least once, had a coffee at one of the terraces of numerous and picturesque café bars lined along this unusual promenade, would agree.
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Maritime and History Museum of the Croatian Coast
The museum is headquartered in the former Governor's Palace, a historicist edifice and protected cultural monument. The Governor's Palace was constructed in 1896 and designed by Alajos Hauszmann, one of the foremost Hungarian architects during the time when Rijeka was under Hungarian rule. Today, the palace houses the Maritime and History Museum of the Croatian Littoral, which was established in 1961 and comprises maritime, historical and cultural, ethnographic and archaeological departments. Some of the original items from the Governor's Palace, such as furniture and artisan craft-work, have been preserved and exhibited in salons on the first floor. The permanent exhibition of the museum provides an interactive and modern platform for showcasing the long, rich and tumultuous history and culture of living in the area of what is today Primorje-Gorski Kotar County from prehistoric times to the present day. The Lipa Pamti Memorial Centre (Lipa Remembers), which is dedicated to the victims of the Lipa massacre that took place on 30 April 1944, is also a part of the museum. In addition to its memorial heritage, the Memorial Centre interprets the entire cultural, historical and ethnographical heritage of the Liburnian Karst region (Rupa, Pasjak, Šapjane and Brce) from prehistoric times to the present day.
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Chamber of Saint Paul and Saint Catherine
The chamber of Saint Paul used to be part of the abbess' apartment in the Benedectine Convent of Saint Paul, decorated from 1514 at the order of Abbess Giovanna da Piacenza, whose priorate was characterized by a lively cultural life.
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Regio Theatre
Commissioned by Maria Luigia and designed by Nicola Bettoli, the Regio theatre was built between 1821 and 1829 on the site of the Benedectine convent of St. Alessandro.
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Minimundus
Around the world at top speed: See 156 models of the most beautiful buildings from over 40 countries around the world up close! Minimundus, the miniature world at Lake Wörthersee, is a place for exploring, having fun, spending time, learning and enjoying. With models from every continent, the world is miniaturised, covering over 26,000 m² of parkland. On a scale of 1:25, the most beautiful buildings have been recreated in detail according to original plans and using original materials such as marble, sandstone or lava basalt. Nowhere else can you experience the world in just one day. Experience the Minimundus of the next generation. An exhibition of new dimensions, with adventure, games and fun, covers over 1,500 m².
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Lindwurm Fountain
The dragon depicted on the fountain is the symbol of the city. There is a lovely square around it where you can sit and relax. In the 13th century a dragon was wreaking havoc in Klagenfurt, causing floods that destroyed crossings and threatened travelers along the River Glen. A duke offered a reward for anyone who could capture it, and a brave young man tied a bull to a chain and caught the dragon like a fish. In 1335 the dragon’s skull was found in a nearby quarry aptly known as Dragon’s Grave. The capital city of Carinthia proudly displayed it in the city’s town hall, and in 1590 Ulrich Vogelsang used it to make what is often cited as the earliest known reconstruction of an extinct animal—it’s attributed to Vogelsang, but it’s more likely an anonymous artist made the sculpture, carved from a single block of chlorite slate. Legend claims 300 men, dressed in all white, carried the six-ton beast to the center of town.
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The Accademia Gallery
Visiting the Galleria dell’Accademia, you're most likely target are the magnificent giant marble sculptures created by Michelangelo, and above all, the glorious David. If you explore the museum with a bit more time, the Accademia will offer you much more in the less crowded halls, satisfying any curiosity for botany, music, art symbols and painting techniques. The Accademia welcomes the visitor in the Hall of the Colossus, name taken from the huge models of the Dioscuri of Montecavallo which were displayed in this large hall in the 19th century. It now hosts in the center the plaster model for the stunning marble sculpture of Giambologna’s Rape of the Sabine Women. Giambologna prepared the model as an exercise in creating a tightly-knit group of three figures from just one large block of marble. He did not actually name the sculpture, it was meant to be as a “simple” exercise of skill and it became the first example of such magnificent talent.
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Florence Cathedral
Florence's cathedral stands tall over the city with its magnificent Renaissance dome designed by Filippo Brunelleschi, with the baptistery right across. The cathedral named in honor of Santa Maria del Fiore is a vast Gothic structure built on the site of the 7th century church of Santa Reparata, the remains of which can be seen in the crypt. The exterior is covered in a decorative mix of pink, white and green marble. The interior, by contrast, is pretty stark and plain but quite enjoyable on warm summer days since the temperature inside tends to be cooler. Please note the clock above the entrance on the inside of the church. It was designed in 1443 by Paolo Uccello in accordance with the ora italica, where the 24th hour of the day ended at sunset... and it still works!
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Piazza della Signoria
The Piazza della Signoria has been the center of political life in Florence since the 14th century with the prominent Palazzo Vecchio overlooking the square. It was the scene of great triumphs, such as the return of the Medici in 1530 as well as the Bonfire of the Vanities instigated by Savonarola, who was then himself burned at the stake here in 1498 after he was denounced by the Inquisition as a heretic. A marble circle inscription on the piazza shows the location where he was burned. The sculptures in Piazza della Signoria bristle with political connotations, many of which are fiercely contradictory. The David (the original is in the Galleria dell'Accademia) by Michelangelo was placed outside the Palazzo Vecchio as a symbol of the Republic's defiance of the tyrannical Medici.
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The Palazzo Vecchio Museum & Tower
Palazzo Vecchio offers Roman ruins, a Medieval fortress and amazing Renaissance chambers and paintings. A microcosm where art and history have been indissolubly bound for centuries. Palazzo Vecchio is the main symbol of civil power for the city of Florence, whose original project is attributed to Arnolfo di Cambio. Construction on the solid fortress began in 1299 above the ruins of the destroyed Uberti Ghibelline towers, testimony of the final victory of the Guelph faction. The entire construction also rests on top of the ancient theater of the Roman colony of Florentia (dating back to the first century A.D.), whose ruins can be admired in the underground level. This area can be visited with a separate ticket or a combination ticket which includes the Palazzo Vecchio Museum and the Archaeological site. The area is suggestive organized with information and an interesting film to help you understand exactly what you are looking at underground.
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The Uffizi Gallery
Like a very precious treasure chest, the Uffizi Gallery will grant itself to visitors just a little bit at a time: from the initial uncertainty on where to get tickets, getting through lines to get inside and at the metal detector, then taking two flights of Renaissance-era stairs before you arrive at the actual entrance to the museum.
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Palazzo Pitti and the Boboli Gardens
This enormous palace is one of Florence's largest architectural monuments. The original palazzo was built for the Pitti family in 1457, designed by Filippo Brunelleschi and built by his pupil Luca Fancelli. The original construction consisted of only the middle cube of the present building. In 1549, the property was sold to the Medicis and became the primary residence of the grand ducal family. The palace was then enlarged and altered; from 1560, Bartolomeo Ammannati designed and added the grandiose courtyard and two lateral wings. Today, the Pitti Palace houses some of the most important museums in Florence: on the first floor is the Palatine Gallery, containing a broad collection 16th and 17th century paintings (including works by Raphael), and the Royal Apartments, containing furnishings from a remodeling done in the 19th century. On the ground floor and mezzanine is the Treasury of the Grand Dukes (formerly known as the the Silver Museum or Museo degli Argenti) displaying a vast collection of Medici household treasures, from table silverware to precious stone vases, rock crystals and precious jewelry. The Gallery of Modern Art is on the top floor, holding a collection of mostly Tuscan 19th and 20th century paintings.
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The Teatro Donizetti
The Teatro Donizetti covers a total area of 3200 square meters. The hall’s dimensions respect the original 1786 design: it measures 360 square meters and it’s able to seat 532 people. There are 120 boxes, divided into three tiers, totalling 1154 seats.
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Golden Roof
Innsbruck's most famous landmark shines in the heart of the historic old town. The splendid alcove balcony gets its name from the 2,657 fire-gilded copper tiles that adorn the roof. The building has reigned over medieval houses and shady arcades for over 500 years. It was built by Emperor Maximilian who very much enjoyed the view: from there he would look down over the colourful hustle and bustle of his city, watch jousting tournaments and be revered from below. The shining golden roof can be seen on entering the historic old town but it is also well worth taking a look up close. The structure below the roof is richly adorned with a wide variety of figures and images, including many curiosities. An exposed backside sticks prominently out from the Golden Roof. Admittedly, it is only a few centimetres in size and it belongs to one of the many figures set below the roof. Why bare facts? This question remains unanswered and is one of the many mysteries that surround the landmark. Maybe the revenge of medieval craftsmen who weren't paid? We can only speculate. The front of the structure is decorated with a man and two wives: Emperor Maximilian is portrayed next to his wife of the time Bianca Maria Sforza. He didn't like her much, however, and that is why his first wife – Maria von Burgund – also looks out from the relief. Another eye-catcher: Small men with twisted limbs. They are morisco dancers, who were effectively the breakdancers of the Middle Ages. The Golden Roof is a must-see for anyone visiting Innsbruck. Come to the historic old town and see for yourself. You can't miss it. In the adjoining museum, you can immerse yourself in the time of Emperor Maximilian.
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The Certosa di Calci
As you exit the main highway at Cascina on the east to west road called the FI-PI-LI and start to drive towards the Apuane Alps, you slowly shake off the busy industrial sensations and start to ease yourself into the quiet and tranquility that first drew the Carthusian monks to this area.
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Camposanto Monumentale
The Cemetery is the last monument on Piazza del Duomo, its long marble wall flanking the northern boundary and completing its shape. It was founded in 1277 to accommodate the graves that until then were scattered all around the Cathedral. Archbishop Federico Visconti wanted the building to be a “large and dignified, secluded and enclosed place”. This is how one of the oldest Christian Medieval architectures for the devotion of the dead came into being.