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Art and Culture in New York

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United States
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St. Patrick
St. Patrick's Cathedral is the Mother Church of the Archdiocese of New York and the seat of the Archbishop. Located on Fifth Avenue, across from Rockefeller Center, the sanctuary is the largest Gothic Catholic cathedral in the US. This international landmark, dedicated in 1879, welcomes more than five million visitors each year. With its 330-foot spires, it is one of the City's most spectacular architectural sights. Inside, it boasts a seating capacity of 2,400, numerous altars and stained glass windows, and a giant organ with 7,855 pipes.
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art presents over 5,000 years of art from around the world for everyone to experience and enjoy. The Museum lives in three iconic sites in New York City—The Met Fifth Avenue, The Met Breuer, and The Met Cloisters. Since it was founded in 1870, The Met has always aspired to be more than a treasury of rare and beautiful objects. Every day, art comes alive in the Museum's galleries and through its exhibitions and events, revealing both new ideas and unexpected connections across time and across cultures. On January 13, 2015, the Trustees of The Metropolitan Museum of Art reaffirmed this statement of purpose and supplemented it with the following statement of mission: The Metropolitan Museum of Art collects, studies, conserves, and presents significant works of art across all times and cultures in order to connect people to creativity, knowledge, and ideas.
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Venice Island Performing Arts and Recreation Center
Venice Island Performing Arts and Recreation Center's mission and priorities have emerged from the hopes and aspirations expressed by City of Philadelphia and Manayunk neighborhood leaders, the Executive Advisory Board, and over 500 residents who participated in surveying and community conversations.
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Rodin Museum
The repository of the largest collection of works by Auguste Rodin outside of Paris features treasures such as The Gates of Hell and a bronze caste of The Thinker. All told, you’ll find more than 120 of the French master’s sculptures here, as well as a fascinating collection of drawings, paintings and studies. The variety of works on hand offers the perfect opportunity to contrast and compare the ways in which Rodin used and re-used the same stances, and even body parts, throughout his work.
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Philadelphia Museum of Art
Founded in 1876, the Philadelphia Museum of Art showcases more than 2,000 years of human creativity, the collections and special exhibitions present masterpieces of painting, sculpture, decorative arts and architectural settings from Europe, Asia and the Americas.
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Historic Cold Spring Village
Visit 26 restored historic buildings on 30 shaded acres where interpreters in period clothing bring the 1800s to life. Enjoy demonstrations of blacksmithing, basket weaving, book binding and more! Farm animals, carriage rides, and family activities from June-September. Special weekend events. Country Store, Ice Cream Parlor and Restaurant. Education and distance learning programs from October-May.
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Marble House
Marble House was built between 1888 and 1892 for Mr. and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt. It was a summer house, or "cottage", as Newporters called them in remembrance of the modest houses of the early 19th century. But Marble House was much more; it was a social and architectural landmark that set the pace for Newport's subsequent transformation from a quiet summer colony of wooden houses to the legendary resort of opulent stone palaces. The house was designed by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The cost of the house was reported in contemporary press accounts to be $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. Upon its completion, Mr. Vanderbilt gave the house to his wife as a 39th birthday present. The Vanderbilts divorced in 1895 and Alva married Oliver H.P. Belmont, moving down the street to Belcourt. After his death, she reopened Marble House, and had a Chinese Tea House built on the seaside cliffs, where she hosted rallies for women's right to vote. She sold the house to Frederick H. Prince in 1932. The Preservation Society acquired the house in 1963 from the Prince estate. In 2006, Marble House was designated a National Historic Landmark.
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Rhode Island School of Design Museum (RISD)
The RISD Museum acquires, preserves, exhibits, and interprets works of art and design representing diverse cultures from ancient times to the present. Distinguished by its relationship to the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), the Museum educates and inspires artists, designers, students, scholars, and the general public through exhibitions, programs, and publications. RISD Museum's collection currently contains more than 100,000 works of art and design dating from ancient times to today including paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, costume and textiles, and furniture from all over the world. Of these objects, 3,352 of them are on view in the Museum now, 81,343 of them are available online, and there are 3,867 recent acquisitions.
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National Great Blacks In Wax Museum
National Great Blacks In Wax Museum is American first wax museum of African American history and culture features more than 150 life-size and lifelike wax figures.
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The Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower
The Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower has been a Baltimore landmark since its construction in 1911. The Baltimore Office of Promotions & The Arts has transformed the Tower into a space for visual and literary artists.
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Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
After Isabella Stewart Gardner's husband died in 1898, the art enthusiast bought land in Boston's Fenway area to open a museum to display her impressive collection of Italian art. The museum, which was fashioned after the Palazzo Barbaro in Venice, was completed in 1902, at which point Gardner moved in to the fourth floor and began installing her collection.
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Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)
The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston is one of the world's great art museums with masterpieces from around the world and across the ages, including more Monets than any museum outside of Paris, an unrivaled Japanese art collection, treasures from Egypt and the ancient world, and American art from colonial to modern times. At every turn, travel to a time and a place that will inform, enlighten, and inspire. Now open is the spectacular Art of the Americas Wing. Paintings, sculpture, furniture, works on paper, textiles, and decorative arts tell the story of the art of the Americas from the prehistoric times to the present day. More than 5000 glorious examples of art produced in North, Central, and South America are displayed—some for the first time.
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Freedom Trail
The famous Freedom Trail is a 2.5 mile red-brick trail through Boston’s historic neighborhoods that tells the story of the American Revolution. From the Old North Church to Faneuil Hall, and through resonant burying grounds, visit the temples and landmarks of the Revolutionary Era.
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Museum of African American History
The Museum of African American History is New England’s largest museum dedicated to preserving, conserving and interpreting the contributions of African Americans. In Boston and Nantucket, the Museum has preserved four historic sites and two Black Heritage Trails® that tell the story of organized black communities from the Colonial Period through the 19th century.
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Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Over 70 retailers and 40 office tenants occupy the 200,000 square feet of retail and 160,000 square feet of space on Boston’s iconic mixed use festival marketplace. Customers enjoy unique, locally loved, and nationally recognized shops while indulging in the worldwide cuisine at our restaurants, pubs, and in the world-famous Quincy Market Colonnade. The cobblestone promenades are filled with the music and jaw-dropping routines of world-renowned street performers and musicians. Faneuil Hall Marketplace is at the top of the list of things to see in Boston!
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National Portrait Gallery
Painting a picture of the many influential people throughout America’s history, the National Portrait Gallery is a must-see for pop culture fans, history buffs and art lovers alike. From activists and actors to presidents and poets, the museum displays paintings, photographs and sculptures of the people that have come to define America as we know it.
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National Gallery of Art
The National Gallery of Art, founded as a gift to the nation, serves as a center of visual art, education, and culture. Their collection of more than 150,000 paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, photographs, prints, and drawings spans the history of Western art and showcases some of the triumphs of human creativity. Across 363 days a year, the Gallery offers a full spectrum of special exhibitions and public programs free of charge.
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National Museum of Women in the Arts
On the first Sunday of the month, one of the District’s most intriguing museums waives its admission charge. During Free Community Day, the National Museum of Women in the Arts opens up its collection and features programs that connect to its current exhibitions, helping you to discover the immense impact that women have on the world of art.
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Renwick Gallery
Permanent collection and exhibitions of American crafts. This gem of a museum, located in a historic building near the White House, is dedicated to exhibiting the finest American crafts from the 19th century to the present.
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Washington Monument
Built to honor George Washington, the United States' first president, the 555-foot marble obelisk towers over Washington, D.C.George Washington's military and political leadership were indispensable to the founding of the United States. As commander of the Continental Army, he rallied Americans from thirteen divergent states and outlasted Britain's superior military force. As the first president, Washington's superb leadership set the standard for each president that has succeeded him. The Washington Monument towers above the city that bears his name, serving as an awe-inspiring reminder of George Washington's greatness. The monument, like the man, stands in no one's shadow.The Washington Monument, designed by Robert Mills and eventually completed by Thomas Casey and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, honors and memorializes George Washington at the center of the nation's capital. The structure was completed in two phases of construction, one private (1848-1854) and one public (1876-1884). Built in the shape of an Egyptian obelisk, evoking the timelessness of ancient civilizations, the Washington Monument embodies the awe, respect, and gratitude the nation felt for its most essential Founding Father. When completed, the Washington Monument was the tallest building in the world at 555 feet, 5-1/8 inches.
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CMAC (Performing Art Center)
Constellation Brands - Marvin Sands Performing Arts Center is the site of popular concerts and entertainment. 5,000 covered seats, lawn seating for 10,000 +, new state-of-the-art lawn video and sound system, expanded stage and concessions. Photo by Brian Richardson
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Geva Theatre Center
Founded in 1972, Geva serves up to 160,000 patrons annually, including more than 16,000 students. Geva’s productions are created and rehearsed in and for Rochester.
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Fort Henry
Step back in time and experience 19th-Century military life at Fort Henry. As one of Ontario’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Fort Henry is a hotbed of historic activity. Take a guided tour, fire a rifle, sit in on a class in a Victorian schoolroom, watch a parade of traditional marching music, and stick around in the evening for a dramatic reenactment during the Sunset Ceremony. Visit Fort Henry throughout the year as it plays host to a number of Kingston’s favourite events like the YGK Craft Beer Fest, Cannonball Crush, and Fort Fright. Fort Henry is a can’t-miss stop during your time in Kingston.
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Agnes Etherington Art Centre
Agnes Etherington Art Centre is a research‐intensive art museum located on the historic campus of Queen’s University. It illuminates the great artistic traditions of the past and the innovations of the present through year-round programs of exhibitions and outreach activities staged across eight beautiful galleries, the Biéler Studio, and assorted public spaces including the gracious period rooms of the historic Etherington House. As a space of display, innovation and exchange, the Agnes is an experiential learning space for diverse disciplines at Queen’s, and the public gallery for Kingston region. Its superb collections—numbering over 17,000 works―include cutting edge contemporary art and fine examples of Canadian historical art, Indigenous art and artifacts, and material culture including an unusual collection of Canadian Historical Dress and the Lang Collection of African Art. The Bader Collection, focusing on Rembrandt and his school, centres on more than 200 paintings from the Dutch Golden Age, including one portrait and three beautiful character studies by Rembrandt.
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Kingston Grand Theatre
One of the main cultural venues in the greater Kingston region, the City of Kingston’s Grand Theatre serves as the prime performing arts venue for hundreds of professional and amateur performances annually including ballet, modern dance, theatre, variety, musicals, comedy and more. The building houses an array of performance and reception spaces including the Regina Rosen Auditorium, the Baby Grand, a black box theatre, two lounges used for receptions and art exhibits; as well as a lobby and backstage facilities. Located in the heart of downtown Kingston on Princess St., the Grand Theatre is a year-round destination for residents and visitors.
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Buffalo City Hall
From the architects George J. Dietel and John J. Wade, Buffalo City Hall was built between 1929-1931. Buffalo City Hall is an Art Deco masterpiece with outstanding murals depicting the city’s history and industry. Common Council Chamber with exquisite skylight and sculptures are a must-see. Observation Tower gives a spectacular view of the waterfront and the Ellicott radial street design for Buffalo. Closed weekends and holidays.
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Albright-Knox Art Gallery
An outstanding center of modern and contemporary art, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery has a 150-year tradition of collecting, conserving, and exhibiting the art of its time, giving rise to one of the world’s most extraordinary art collections. The Albright-Knox Art Gallery has temporarily closed its Elmwood Avenue campus to begin the construction phase of its AK360 Campus Development and Expansion Project. As part of the project, the museum will construct a signature new building on the north side of its campus and renovate its current facilities. Albright-Knox Northland, a new project space at 612 Northland Avenue in Buffalo, will open on January 17, 2020. The new Buffalo AKG Art Museum is expected to open in Spring 2022 on the Elmwood Avenue campus.
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The Buffalo History Museum
This National Historic Landmark building was built in 1901 during the Pan-American Exposition, and now houses The Buffalo History Museum (renamed in 2012). Research library includes a repository of genealogical information; the museum features exhibits and an extensive collection of artefacts, manuscripts, books and photographs chronicling the development of Buffalo and the Niagara Frontier.
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Frick Art & Historical Center
Visitors will enjoy the Frick Art Museum; the Car and Carriage Museum; Clayton, the restored 19th-Century Victorian home of Henry Clay Frick; the Cafe at the Frick; the Greenhouse; and the Visitors' Center which once served as the Frick children's playhouse.
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Carnegie Museum of Art
Carnegie Museum of Art is arguably the first museum of contemporary art in the United States, collecting the "old master of tomorrow" since the inception of the Carnegie International in 1896. Today the Museum of Art is among the most popular and esteemed cultural institutions in the region, providing visitors with access to great works of art, studio art classes, and interpretive programs that inspire, provoke, and delight. Carnegie Museum of Art has collection of more than 32,000 objects features a broad spectrum of visual art, including painting and sculpture; prints and drawings; photographs; architectural casts, renderings, and models; decorative arts and design; and film, video, and digital imagery. The museum also houses the archive of over 70,000 negatives by photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris.
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Oshawa Museum (OM)
For over 60 years, the Oshawa Museum (OM) has celebrated its City’s history with engaging events, inspiring exhibits, and an immense collection of archival materials. Nestled on the shores of Lake Ontario in beautiful Lakeview Park, the OM tells the story of Oshawa from Indigenous inhabitants to present day. Home to Oshawa’s history, the OM is managed by the Oshawa Historical Society. OM collection is diverse and highlights include a photograph/postcard collection from the late Thomas Bouckley, newspaper microfilm dating to 1862, reference library featuring local history books, artifacts from the Henry, Robinson and Guy families and other early settlers, medical instrument collection, extensive camera collection, 7,000 item Grandview artifact collection and vast photograph collection depicting Oshawa events, places and personalities. The Oshawa Museum is an important heritage resource in Oshawa. As one of the few remaining heritage districts and Oshawa's only community museum, the four buildings that comprise the Museum are ideally situated to tell the story of Oshawa from its earliest native occupation to present times.
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Saint Joseph Oratory of Mount Royal
Rising majestically above the cityscape is Saint Joseph’s Oratory of Mount Royal. It is the largest sanctuary dedicated to Saint Joseph and one of the world’s most visited pilgrimage sites with over 2 million visitors per year. In 1904, Brother André, a simple porter renowned for his miracle cures (which he attributed to Saint Joseph), set out to construct a small wooden chapel, which would ultimately become one of the city’s most impressive religious buildings. It wasn’t until 1967, thirty years after his death, that the immense sanctuary was completed. The shrine includes a majestic basilica for close to 2,000 worshippers, with a dome that reaches a soaring 97 metres, the original chapel, a votive chapel, and a crypt. Here lies Brother André, canonized in 2010 as Saint André of Montréal by Pope Benedict XVI in Rome. The Museum of Saint Joseph’s Oratory, primarily dedicated to sacred art, houses an exceptional collection of crèches, a must-see during the holidays.
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The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
At over a hundred years old and still going strong, the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is more avant-garde and relevant than ever before. Driven by a daring and innovative approach, it has developed into a venerable museum complex revered by lovers of art, music and cinema from here and abroad. Founded in 1860, it was one of the first museums in North America to establish an encyclopedic collection. Today, it comprises over 43 000 works from Antiquity to modern day. Its five pavilions, each with a distinct vocation and architectural style, meld beautifully into the city’s urban fabric. The oldest of them all, the Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion, dates back to 1912. Its majestic marble staircase takes you to the Museum’s temporary exhibitions.
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Mary Queen of the World Cathedral
Nestled among busy office buildings in Montréal’s downtown core, lies Mary Queen of the World Cathedral, the third largest church in Québec after Saint Joseph’s Oratory and the Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré. Built at the end of the 19th century in the heart of what was then the city's Anglo-Protestant sector, this ornate Renaissance cathedral is replica of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, a departure from the Gothic Revival style so popular at the time. Covering nearly 4,700 square meters, the cathedral is built in the shape of a Latin cross, with a large portico built in coursed ashlar and topped by a green copper dome. From high above, statues of the patron saints from Montréal’s thirteen parishes watch over all who enter. Inside, a superb neo-baroque baldachin in red copper and gold leaf overlooks the high altar. In the transept, paintings by Georges Delfosse illustrate the historic beginnings of Montréal while numerous works throughout bear witness to the city’s religious legacy.
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Robert McLaughlin Gallery (RMG)
The RMG houses a permanent collection of over 4,500 works, The Thomas Bouckley Collection, an outdoor public sculpture and 4 galleries of changing exhibitions, an art library and archives. Each of these collections tells the continuing story of Canadian modern and contemporary art. The Thomas Bouckley Collection was donated to the RMG by the late Thomas Bouckley, collector and history enthusiast of Oshawa. The computerized collection comprises over 3,000 historical photographs of Oshawa and Durham Region, spanning over 100 years. The collection is a remarkable resource for understanding and engaging with Oshawa’s local history. The RMG Library is the largest library in Durham Region devoted to fine art and the history of visual arts, and the largest and most comprehensive art library located between Toronto and Kingston. It is available to those interested in art for pleasure or serious research. Library resources include art books, artist monographs, artists’ files, clipping books, Canadian exhibition catalogues, slides, auction catalogues and an extensive journal collection.