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Art and Culture in Dubai

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United Arab Emirates
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The Dubai Fountain
Witness the tallest performing fountain in the world during your visit to Downtown Dubai. The Dubai Fountain offers a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to immerse yourself in a captivating water, music and light experience. Submerged within the 30-acre Burj Lake, at the foot of The Dubai Mall, powerful water jets are laid out strategically over an area equal to the size of two football pitches. The fountain jets up to 22,000 gallons of water as high as 140m in the air at any one time.
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Sharjah Heritage Museum
Set in a restored 18th-century pearl merchant’s house, Sharjah Heritage Museum explores all aspects of Emirati culture, from religious traditions to living in the desert. There are six galleries covering the landscape, lifestyle, celebrations, livelihoods, traditional knowledge and oral traditions of the emirate. The museum presents plenty of interesting objects, including an aftakh – a golden toe ring worn by Bedouin women – with explanations in English and Arabic. Younger visitors will enjoy the engaging folk tales, proverbs and puzzles.
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Sharjah Islamic Museum
Sharjah Museum of Islamic Civilization features seven galleries spread over two levels. The ground-floor galleries cover aspects of the Islamic faith and the achievements of Arab scientists and astronomers. The upper floors offer a chronological overview of Islamic arts and crafts, including textiles and jewellery. Housed in building every bit as impressive as its collection, the museum is located on the Corniche, just north of the Heart of Sharjah district. Astrolabes, manuscripts, ceramics and coins all vie for your attention but don’t miss the gold-embroidered curtain for the door of the Holy Ka’ba and the mosaic inside the central dome detailing the zodiac constellations.
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Cultural Square
The Cultural Square features a 14-metre high pedestal with a sculpture of the Holy Quran. It is the centrepiece of the roundabout in the square, representing the spiritual heart of the city. The sculpture, which was designed by Spanish sculptor Marinas Rubias, is encircled by a number of stately buildings in typical Islamic architecture. These Sharjah buildings are of prominence in UAE history, particularly the Ruler’s Office and the Ahmad Bin Hanbal Mosque. Also in the square is the Cultural Palace, a place for concerts and events. When you’re in Sharjah next, make sure to drive by the cultural square. It is a key highlight of the many tourist places in Sharjah. Since the sculpture is at a roundabout, you can easily drive by it more than once. If you’re thinking of things to do with kids here, they will enjoy going around a few times in your car. Cultural Square is one of the popular places to visit in Sharjah with children, especially to learn about Islamic art.
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Sharjah Islamic Culture Capital Monument 2014
The Sharjah Islamic Culture Capital memorial rises 42 meters and the podium occupies an area of 650 square meters, while the total area of the base that carries the highest column monument is 50 square meters.
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Louvre Abu Dhabi
The iconic Louvre Abu Dhabi is the first universal museum in the Arab World that translates the spirit of openness of cultures. As one of the premier cultural institutions located in the heart of the Saadiyat Cultural District, the art-lovers dream displays the works of historical, cultural and sociological significance from ancient times to the contemporary era. Designed by Pritzker-prize winning architect Jean Nouvel, the Louvre Abu Dhabi encompasses 9,200 sq. m of galleries including the Permanent Gallery and a Temporary Gallery that is enriched by loans from many notable French museums including Musee du Louvre, Musee d'Orsay, and Centre Pompidou. Recreating parts of UAE’s integral cultural elements, Nouvel designed a falaj-inspired water system running through the museum, inspired by ancient Arabian engineering whilst the orderly lace dome borrows inspiration from the interlaced palm leaves traditionally used as roofing material in many parts of the country that results in an enchanting play of light. The juxtaposition of different civilizations in the same spaces, the Louvre Abu Dhabi illustrates similarities and exchanges from the shared human experience going beyond geography, nationality, and history.
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Al Jahili Fort
Since opening its gates in 2008, Al Jahili Fort has been a cultural the focal point of activities associated with philosophy and heritage of Abu Dhabi in the Garden City. Al Jahili is one of the largest forts in the UAE and was built in the 1890s on orders from Zayed The First as the home to members of the Al Nahyan ruling family. Between 2007 and 2008, the fort was restored by the Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage, who transformed it into a cultural centre and tourist attraction that now houses a permanent exhibition devoted to Wilfred Thesiger, the intrepid explorer, travel writer and photographer, who crossed the Empty Quarter twice in the 1940s, and a temporary exhibition gallery. Surrounded by a lush park, this enchanting fort won the prestigious Terra Award for the best Earthen Architecture in the world in 2016.
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Qasr Al Watan
Qasr Al Watan, the new cultural landmark in Abu Dhabi, opens its doors to the public in an invitation to discover the legacy of knowledge and tradition that have shaped the journey of the nation, boosting cultural understanding of the United Arab Emirates. More than a traditional palace, Qasr Al Watan is an exquisitely crafted tribute to the Arabian heritage and artistry, and its architecture and design echo the significance of the exhibits housed within its halls and the function of its most iconic rooms. Qasr Al Watan invites visitors to learn about the country’s governing traditions and values, and explore a well-preserved legacy of knowledge, thus boosting cultural understanding of the UAE.
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Museum of Islamic Art
xperience 14 centuries of great art in a few hours. The MIA’s magnificent and imaginatively presented displays of the finest art and artefacts from across the Islamic world have earned it recognition among the world’s top cultural institutions.
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Souq Waqif
A stroll down the bustling alleys of Souq Waqif provides an authentic taste of traditional commerce, architecture and culture. The maze of small shops offer a dazzling array of Middle Eastern merchandise from spices and seasonal delicacies to perfumes, jewellery, clothing, handicrafts and a treasure trove of souvenir bargains.
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Tomb of Saadi
Tomb of Saadi: The Tomb of Saadi is also called Saadieh. The first mausoleum was built in 13th century, however, it faced destruction in 17th century. The building that tourists visit today is the heritage of 1950s. The present building, which its architect was Mohsen Foroughi, was inspired by Chehel Sotun of Esfahan. Moreover, a Sassanid-year-old garden, the gorgeous Delgosha Garden is near the Tomb. The Tomb of Saadi was a Khangah* where Saadi lived the final days of his life there. And so he was buried there. Inside the mausoleum, the verses of Saadi poems are inscribed all around the walls.
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Bagh-e Narenjestan
Bagh-e Narenjestan (or Qavam House) is a historical house in the city of Shiraz. Construction of the house dates back to late 19th century (Late Qajar era), belonging to the famous wealth family of Qavam in Shiraz. Qavam House is one of Shiraz tourist attractions for its beautiful garden of sour oranges and exquisite architecture. While walking in the alleys of Shiraz, the smell of bitter orange intoxicates you. Now imagine wandering in the garden of bitter orange: Bagh-e Narenjestan! Bagh-e Narenjestan Shiraz or Narenjestan Garden Shiraz is famous for its bitter oranges and also the great mansions inside it. Narenjestan Shiraz is a must-visit to truly appreciate what makes Shiraz so famous among people.
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Persepolis
Tourists coming down to Shiraz must not miss the chance to visit the Persepolis. The Persepolis, Shiraz is a must to every itinerary to Shiraz for its beauty the grandeur and history. It is a major Shiraz Tourist attraction which represents the grandeur of the Persian Empire. The Persepolis, Shiraz is situated at the center of the Persian Empire and was the ceremonial capital of the Achaemenians. The exact location of the Persepolis in Shiraz is in Fars province which lies at a distance of 60 kilometers from Shiraz, near Marvdasht city.
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Ganjalikhan Bathhouse
This bath is a collection of art, architecture and using different materials with a suitable space which attracts people to itself. The architect of bath and in general Ganjali khan complex is a Yazdian architect named “Ostad Mohammad Soltani” who indeed knew the political, economical and cultural conditions of its time. Ganjali khan bath is a wonderful work, that with its beautiful tile-works, paintings plaster-works pats the eyes of every visitor. Baths are included among the inseparable part of the city’s building and are the main and important parts of Islamic cities and villages. The entrance to the Ganjali bathhouse is located along a section of Ganjali Khan Bazaar. The entry portal of these baths has been decorated with beautiful paintings of Safavid era. The bath is 64m in length and 30m in width at an area about 1380 sq.m. The length of its hot-chamber (Garmkhane) is 6/25m in width is 7/5 m and its reservoir is 8/5 m in length and 5/7 in width at an area of 44/8sq.m. It consists of two main parts; hot-chamber and dressing room. According to the class division in Safavid era the dressing room of bath has 6 chambers which each of them devoted to a special social class, including “Sayeds, clregies, tribal chiefs, grades, merchants and rustics. However, today they are one are two statues in every chamber of the dressing room that demonstrate the feature of mentioned classes.
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Yazd Masjid-e-Jameh
The Masjid-e-Jameh Yazd is the grand, congregational mosque of Yazd city. The 12th-century mosque is still in use today. It was first built under Ala’oddoleh Garshasb of the Al-e Bouyeh dynasty. The mosque was largely rebuilt between 1324 and 1365, and is one of the outstanding historical buildings of Iran. The mosque is a fine specimen of the Azari style of Persian architecture. The mosque is crowned by a pair of minarets, the highest in Iran, and the portal’s facade is decorated from top to bottom in dazzling tile work, predominantly blue in colour. Within is a long arcaded courtyard where behind a deep-set south-east iwan is a sanctuary chamber (shabestan). This chamber, under a squat tiled dome, is exquisitely decorated with faience mosaic: its tall faience Mihrab, dated 1365, is one of the finest of its kind in existence. The elegant patterns of brickwork and the priceless inscription of mosaic tiles bearing angular Kufic all create a sense of beauty. The main prayer niche, the one which is located below the dome, is decorated with elegant mosaic tiles. On the two star-shaped inlaid tiles, the name of the builder and the time of construction of the prayer niche sparkle beautifully. The two towering minarets dating back to the Safavid era measure 52 meters in height and 6 meters in diameter.
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Abyaneh Village
Abyaneh village is situated on the slopes of Karkass Mountain in Natanz County of Isfahan Province. With a population of 301 (2016 census), the history of Abyaneh village dates back to 1500 years ago, making it one of the top attractions of Isfahan, and one of the unique villages of Iran, for its peculiar reddish hue. Most famed for its peculiar red hue and nature-adapted layout, Abyaneh village attracts thousands of Iranian and foreign tourists year-round. However, there is more to Abyaneh red village than meets the eye, which is why it was listed as one of Iran’s national heritage sites in 1975. According to a 2016 census, the population of Abyaneh village was 301. People mostly subsist on agriculture (including orchards) and raising cattle; While rug weaving workshops and making traditional Giveh shoes are a source of income for the villagers too. Needless to say that tourism is an ever-growing industry for Abyaneh historical village.
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Fin Garden
Fin Garden is located on the western end of Kashan city. Fin Garden (Bagh-e fin) is the oldest existing Persian Garden in Iran. Built in 1590 by the order of the Safavid king, Shah Abbas I, the garden was expanded in early Qajar era (late 18th century). It counts as one of the most important Kashan tourist attractions. Fin garden is a UNESCO world heritage site since 2011, along with 8 other Persian Gardens in Iran. Fin Garden architecture is a perfect sample of Iranian Gardens and a mixture of architectural features from Safavid era, Zandiyeh and Qajar periods. There was symmetry applying on the garden plan, but later the addition of the buildings by the kings led to its plan’s symmetry decrease.
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Tabatabaei House
Tabatabaei House is a historic traditional house in the city of Kashan. Built in 1835, the house belonged to the affluent Tabatabaei family. The house measures 5,000 sqm and includes 40 rooms. Tabatabaei Historical House is the quintessential example of Iranian climate-adaptive vernacular architecture. Tabatabaei House in Kashan is also known as “the bride” among all other traditional Houses. The reason behind this naming is the fact that the delicate beauty visible to the visitors of the mansion is one of a merit kind! Tabatabaei Historical House is one of the well-preserved original Persian mansions of Iran. You will be astonished with the details of the Tabatabaei House architecture. Tabatabaei House in Kashan along with a couple of other mansions are the most visited Kashan attractions. Tabataba’iha House is occasionally used in the production of films portraying the old Iran.
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Mada
Mada’en Saleh, also known as Al Hijr, is a series sandstone outcrop of various sizes and heights surrounded by a ring sand mountains. It is a pre-Islamic archaeological site located in the Al-Ula sector, within the Al Madinah Region of Saudi Arabia.
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Osian
Osian is an ancient town located in the middle of the Thar Desert. Often known as the "Khajuraho of Rajasthan", Ossian is famous as the home to a cluster of ruined Brahmanical and Jain temples dating from the 8th to 11th centuries. One can enjoy the view of 18 shrines, out of which Surya or Sun Temple, the later Kali temple, Sachiya Mata Temple and the main Jain temple dedicated to Mahavira stand for their grace and architecture.
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Mehrangarh Fort and Museum
Mehrangarh Fort holds the pride of place in Jodhpur because of its splendid architecture and the diverse history associated with it. Considered as one of the most formidable and magnificent forts of Rajasthan, Mehrangarh fort was built by Rao Jodha in the year 1459. The fort is spread over an area of 5 km and is built on 125 m high hill in the outskirts of Jodhpur city. There are seven gates, which can be used to enter the Mehrangarh fort. These 7 gates are made by different rulers, and are built in honour of victory over Bikaner and Jaipur armies. One can see the panoramic view of the Jodhpur city from this fort, which seems like a blue carpet laid at the foot of a hill. Every ruler of Jodhpur has contributed in the making of this fort. Within the fort one can see the magnificent palaces. The main palaces located in the Mehrangarh Fort are Moti Mahal, Phool Mahal, Sheesh Mahal, Zenana Dude, Takht Vilas and Jhanki Mahal. There are also two temples located inside the fort - Chamundi Devi Mandir and Nagnechiaji Mandir, dedicated to Goddess Durga and the Kuldevi respectively.
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Sardar Government Museum
Peak into the history of Jodhpur, and witness its lavish culture at the Government Museum. It is located inside Umaid public gardens and was built in 1909. The museum was constructed under the reign of Maharaja Umed Signhji, and was built by Henry Vaughan Lanchester. The Government Museum houses around 400 sculptures, 10 ancient inscriptions, thousands of miniature paintings, terracotta artwork, ancient coins, metallic objects, arms, stuff toys, stone sculptures, inscriptions and other miscellaneous objects which are simply astonishing. Within the museum vicinity there is a well stocked library and zoo. There is a separate history section for military memorabilia which exhibits tools, weapons, memorials, brass and wooden models.
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Wagah Border
The international border between India and Pakistan. The pomp and pageantry of the Beating Retreat and the Change of Guard within handshaking distance of the Indian and Pakistani forces makes for a most charming spectacle.
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Partition Museum
The Partition of India was one of the most defining events in the history of the subcontinent. It remains till date the largest mass migration in human history. Yet, despite the extensive loss to life and property, almost 70 years later there existed a severe lacuna that no museum or memorial existed anywhere in the world to remember all those millions. With the support of hundreds of people, who donated their time, family objects, funds, and skills, the Partition Museum worked towards opening the entire Museum in time to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the Partition. The opening date for all fourteen galleries was decided as 17 August to mark the day that the Radcliffe award was announced. On 17 August 2017, Hon’ble Chief Minister of Punjab, Shri Amarinder Singh, dedicated the Partition Museum to the nation. It was marked as Partition Remembrance Day in tribute to the millions impacted. Since then over a hundred thousand visitors have come to the Partition Museum. It continues to build its collections and archives and welcomes support in its continued quest to document and remember the history of the millions impacted at the time of the Partition.
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Tower of David Museum
The Tower of David Museum of the History of Jerusalem is located in the restored ancient Citadel of the Old City near the Jaffa Gate, the historic main entrance to the city. The museum tells the long and fascinating history of Jerusalem starting from the second millennium BCE and ending with the modern city you see today. The museum’s facade, The Citadel is itself, a fascinating archaeological site, and provides some of the best 360-degree views across the Old City and Modern City available, and comes to life at night with the Tower of David Night Spectacular. As well as its fascinating permanent displays, the museum regularly hosts changing exhibitions as well as lectures, special cultural events and educational programs. The Tower of David Night Spectacular is an incredible sound and light show, the only one of its kind in the world, in which the walls of The Citadel and Old City are brought to life using amazing audio-visual technologies to provide the story of Jerusalem in a unique experience.
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Musrara
Musrara is a unique neighborhood in Jerusalem, a fascinating microcosm of the city’s history and its various population groups. Walking through the streets, you’ll notice that every house is built differently, and houses have been joined, expanded, cut up and renewed throughout the years of its turbulent history. The municipality has tried to change the name of the neighborhood to Morasha, and you’ll see this name on official maps, but Jerusalem residents proudly continue to use its old name. In recent years, a number of artists have moved to the neighborhood, and three art schools have opened up: a religious film school called Maaleh; Musrara, an edgy photography, animation and sound school; and the School for Oriental Music, which occasionally has open concerts in the evenings, and is lovely to walk past as the musicians practice during the day. These last two are both on Ayin Het street, and there is another gallery next to them. An artists’ collective called Muslala has sprung up, and they engage in artwork in the public domain, involving longtime local residents and social activists from East and West Jerusalem.
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The Israel Museum
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem is Israel’s largest cultural institution and is ranked among the world’s leading art and archeology museums. Founded in 1965, the Israel Museum, Jerusalem was extensively extended and refurbished reopening in 2010. The focus of the museum is on the art, Judaica and ancient artifacts of the Land of Israel and beyond, featuring the most extensive holdings of Biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world. The museum has a collection of nearly 500,000 objects, representing a full scope of world material culture. While there is loads to see at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, there are a number of stand-out highlights. The Shrine of the Book houses the Dead Sea Scrolls which are some of the oldest Biblical scrolls ever found. Adjacent to this is an amazing model of Second Temple Era Jerusalem which reconstructs the topography and architectural character of the city as it was prior to its destruction by the Romans in 66 CE.
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Citadel of Aleppo
One of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world, Aleppo preserves remnants of more than four millennia of Near Eastern history. The Citadel of Aleppo is a densely layered microcosm of this long and complex history.
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Museum of the Jewish People at Beit Hatfutsot
Beit Hatfutsot' - The Museum of the Jewish People (The Disapora House), the Nahum Goldmann Museum of the Jewish Diaspora, is located on the campus of Tel Aviv University. The Museum of the Jewish People tells the story of the Jewish People from its expulsion from the holy land 2,600 years ago to the present day. The Museum of the Jewish People exhibits the diverse histories of the many Jewish communities around the world. It connects visitors with their roots, offers reproductions of beautifully designed synagogues, pictures depicting the differing religious customs and cultural traditions of various communities, and describes the complex and ongoing journey of the Jewish people “Among the Nations.”
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Tel-Aviv Museum of Art
The Tel Aviv Museum of Art houses one of the world’s largest collections of Israeli art. The collection represents the work of some of the leading Jewish artists of the first half of the 20th century and many of the major movements of modern art of this time. The modern and contemporary art museum is a part of the Golda Meir Cultural and Art Center complex, also featuring the Israeli Opera and Cameri Theater. The permanent and temporary exhibitions shown at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art display work by Israeli artists, as well as many infamous international painters. The museum is also home to an art library and archive serving art students and professionals throughout Israel. The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Art Education Center provides classes in a variety of fields to adults and children. The Helena Rubinstein Pavilion for Contemporary Art offers a space to showcase young Israeli talent. The Herta and Paul Amir Building houses an Israeli Architecture Archive and a new section of photography and visual arts. Over 500,000 guests visit the Tel Aviv Museum of Art each year, to enjoy its wide variety of painting, photography, video, sculpture, as well as to participate in the many events held within the museum building. The Tel Aviv Museum of Art is open daily from 10 am. The museum closes at 4 pm on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday, 8 pm on Tuesday and Thursday, and 2 pm on Friday. The museum is closed on Sunday. Museum admission is 42 shekels for adult visitors and free for children up to age 18.
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Habima Theater
The Habima Theater has been Israel’s National Theater since 1935. It was originally the conception of organizers Hannah Rubina and Aaron Baskin, who brought with them from Moscow to Tel Aviv the idea of promoting a unique Hebrew-language theatre and local actors. In keeping with its original purpose, the Habima Theater hosts live theatre, unique events and seminars. Plays chosen at the Habima Theater most often deal with issues important to the State of Israel and its diverse mixture of population. Recurring themes include tensions between Arab and Jewish Israelis, religious and secular Jews, new immigrants and native-born Israelis, and Holocaust memoirs, government corruption or the issue of foreign workers. In order to reach out to all audiences, the Habima Theater also features classic international plays and organizes acting workshops and activities for Israeli youth. Simultaneous translation is available for most live performances. Additionally, the Habima Theater is a member of the Union of the Theatres of Europe and is often invited to join in world tours as a result of this prestigious membership. The original Habima Theater building, which is located at the end of Rothschild Boulevard, has been renovated and was recently inaugurated in the art complex next to the Helena Rubinstein Pavilion for Contemporary Art and the Mann Auditorium, home of the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra.
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Rubin Museum
The Rubin Museum in Tel Aviv is located in the center of the city, in what once served as home and studio of world-renowned painter, Reuven Rubin. Reuven Rubin was the first Israeli painter to receive international acknowledgement and appreciation. Born in Romania, Rubin moved to Israel in 1912 to study painting at Jerusalem’s Bezalel Academy of Art. He continued his studies in Paris before setting up his studio and officially immigrating to Israel in 1923. Over the course of his career, Rubin was named Chairman of the Association of Painters and Sculptors of Palestine, received the Dizengoff Prize and, in 1973 was awarded the Israel Prize for lifetime achievement in art. Rubin died in 1974, leaving his home and studio to his beloved city of Tel Aviv. On display at the museum are close to fifty of Rubin’s paintings created throughout his career in Israel. The museum features multimedia presentations about the artist’s life and work. The Rubin Museum in Tel Aviv also features paintings by contemporary Israeli artists, a shop with reproductions of the artist’s work, and a tour of Rubin’s studio.
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Madatech National Science, Technology and Space Museum
The Madatech National Science, Technology and Space Museum in Haifa, is a large museum crammed with hands-on activities that will please both adults and children. Not far from the Bahai Gardens, in the Hadar neighbourhood of Haifa, the museum is housed in the large edifice which is the old Technion building. The Madatech building was built in the early 1910s, visited by Albert Einstein in 1923 and then made into a museum in 1984. Today the museum hosts some 200,000 visitors annually, many of them children on school trips. The Madatech National Science, Technology and Space Museum can be broken up into five parts for mapping out. The ground floor of the main building contains the front desk, a café, a children’s play area, a gift store and several exhibits such as the history of the printing press and The Road to Safety Exhibition. In the Road to Safety Exhibition children and adults can sit side-by-side on crash simulator, operated only by a museum guide, which proves the need for seatbelts while driving. Be prepared, the crash is quite a jolt! Continuing up a narrow staircase (elevators are also on-site), the first floor comes to view. On the first floor are exhibitions such as the Natural Science Room with over 100 stuffed animals and birds all found in the Haifa area including eagles, mongooses and jungle cats. Other exhibitions include Puzzles & Games, Green Energy and Acoustics & Waves, all going into depths with hands-on displays and tools for everybody to benefit from. In the Green Energy exhibition children can learn about combustion, solar power and light power, many of the displays featuring little lights that illuminate with the power generated at the display. Children can also race sailboats on a table with fans, mapping out wind currents with guided lines on the table. Also on the first floor is the Einstein Hall where an exhibition was made in honour of Ilan Ramon, Israel’s first and only astronaut. Included in the exhibit are some of his personal belongings found at the crash site of the Columbia space shuttle that tragically crashed on descent over Texas.
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Haifa City Museum
The Haifa City Museum is located in the Haifa’s German Colony, at the foot of the famous Baha’i Gardens. Celebrating Haifa’s rich cinematic past, the museum was created within an old Templar Community House originally built in 1869 and recently restored in 2000. Within the museum’s old walls visitors can be taken back to the the age of the silver screen and the years that followed. The Haifa City Museum can be enjoyed by anyone, from film buffs to wide-eyed toddlers with no understanding of the cinematic legends such as Clark Gable, Alfred Hitchcock and Marilyn Monroe. With full blueprints of Haifa’s historical movie-houses, letters on official movie-house letterheads and even opening night invitations in “The Palaces of Haifa” exhibition, you too can be transported back to the time where glamour and fame cycled around the movie industry. A special curtained-off area of the museum’s first floor holds a screen and projector where you can sit and watch old film trailers and old Israeli pre-movie advertisements. Also on display are old film reels and a photo collection donated by a local resident featuring Hollywood’s stars of yesteryear such as Gregory Peck, James Stewart and Marlene Dietrich. Largely featured in the Armon Theatre which was established in the Haifa’s Downtown area, not far from the German Colony, in the year 1935. The original theatre had 1800 seats and an electric removable roof for pleasant summer evenings. On opening night, the Armon Theatre showed “The Merry Widow”, an Oscar-winning musical comedy. The theatre met its demise with its closing in the late 80s and was eventually torn down.