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Architecture in Varanasi

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India
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Kabir Math Varanasi
Kabir Math is located at Lahartara, Varanasi on the Saint Kabir road. Kabir Jayanti is specially celebrated at the Kabir math every year. Many people come to the Kabir math to take part in the Kabir Jayanti celebration
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Kashi Vishwanath Temple
Kashi Vishwanath Temple is one of the most famous temple in Varanasi, also known as the Golden temple dedicated to the Lord Shiva. It was constructed in the year 1780 by the Maratha monarch, Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar of the Indore.
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Sarnath
arnath is a famous place in Varanasi and it is the destination for cultures like Hindu, Buddha and Jain. Sarnath is the place where Gautama Buddha first taught the Dharma then Buddhist Sangha has originated as well as came into existence because of the enlightenment of Kondanna.
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Mangla Gauri Temple
Mangla Gauri temple in Gaya, Bihar, India has been mentioned in Padma Purana, Vayu Purana and Agni Purana and in other scriptures and tantric works. This temple is among the eighteen maha shaktipeeth. The present temple dates back to 15th century.
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Kendui Ghat
Among Buddhists, Hindus and Jains, the city is home to several Ghats where you can pray during Chhath. One of the more popular one visited during Chhath are.
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Mahabodhi Temple
The Mahabodhi Mahavihara or more popularly known as the Bodhgaya Temple or the Great Stupa, is one of the shrines out of the 84000 shrines erected by King Asoka the Great in the 3rd century B.C. The Mahabodhi Mahavihara is the sole surviving example of what was once an architectural genre.
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Kanpur Memorial Church
The Kanpur Memorial Church was built in 1875, in honour of the British who lost their lives in the war of 1857. The Church was designed by Walter Granville, architect of the east Bengal Railway.
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Shri Radhakrishna Temple
Beautifully constructed, J.K. temple is a boon to the devotees. Built by J.K. Trust this architectural delight is a unique blend of ancient architecture with the modern design.
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Kathmandu Valley
Discover ancient temples and myths in the valley of gods where Hinduism and Buddhism meet. Smell and eat traditional Newari food cooked on wood ovens while you are strolling through the small little alleys around the “durbar squares” in one of the ancient king cities of the Kathmandu Valley; Bhaktapur, Patan or Kathmandu.
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Swayambhunath Stupa
Find peace and prayers on the little hillock of Swaymbhunath in the northwest of the Kathmandu Valley. Also known as the "Monkey Temple" among visitors from abroad, Swayambhunath sits atop its hill, overlooking most parts of the valley. This is a good place to catch panoramic views of the city. The site itself has stood as a hallmark of faith and harmony for centuries. The glory of Kathmandu Valley is said to have started from this point.
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Kathmandu Durbar Square
Kathmandu Durbar Square - the uppermost and best-known attraction in Kathmandu lies in old town of Kathmandu, in front of the former royal palace. It is one of the three Durbar Squares in Kathmandu Valley listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. As a cluster of classic architectures and over 50 temples, palaces and courtyards which date back to the 12th to 18th centuries, the square maintains its original building style and glamour.
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Lumbini
One of the world's most important spiritual sites is home to the historic birthplace of the Buddha. Today you can visit over 25 international Buddhist monasteries, study Buddhism, meditation and visit Buddha's birthplace itself within the sacred Mayadevi Gardens!
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Pashupatinath Temple
Dedicated to Lord Shiva, Pashupatinath is one of the four most important religious sites in Asia for devotees of Shiva. Built in the 5th century and later renovated by Malla kings, the site itself is said to have existed from the beginning of the millennium when a Shiva lingam was discovered here.
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Doleshwar Mahadev Temple
Doleshwar Mahadev Temple, which lies in Bhaktapur district of Nepal, is 20 km from the capital city of Kathmandu. It is an approximately of 30 minutes drive from Kathmandu to Doleshwar. For all the Shiva devotees, it is believed that the trip to Kedarnath is incomplete without visiting Doleshwar Mahadeva and Pashupatinath. The visit to all these three holy places is believed to wash off all the sins of one’s lifetime and an opportunity of receiving holy blessings from Lord Shiva.
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Boudhanath Stupa
Take an early morning or evening stroll around the inspiring white dome buzzing with energy; observe the devout passersby, light a butter lamp and send a prayer where you wish, look around for souvenirs, or observe all from a nearby rooftop restaurant, coffee in hand. Situated 8 km to the east of downtown Kathmandu, Boudhanath, is one of the most imposing landmarks in Kathmandu, visible as soon as you land at the Tribhuvan International Airport. It is the largest stupa in the Kathmandu Valley. The 36-meter-high stupa of Boudha is massive and dominates the skyline in the area. With countless monasteries around it, Boudha is the center of Tibetan Buddhism in Nepal. Built in the shape of a mandala designed to replicate the Gyangtse of Tibet, the stupa was renovated by Licchhavi rulers in the 8th century. The location of the stupa is interesting as it once lay on the ancient trade route to Tibet and it was here that Tibetan merchants rested and offered prayers for many centuries. It is one of the major pilgrimage sites for Buddhists from around the world.
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Kapan Monastery
One of the most popular monasteries of Tibetan Buddhism is the Kapan Monastery which is perched on a hill not far north of Boudha. Each year a large number of foreigners arrive here to study Buddhism and meditation. Kapan Monastery was founded by Lama Thubten Yeshe who died in 1984. Interestingly, a small Spanish boy named Osel Torres became his successor after he was declared a reincarnation of the great Lama. However, the reincarnation does not reside at Kapan anymore.
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Rajrappa Temple
Rajrappa, a tourist spot, is known for the 'Chinnamasta Temple' located on the bank of the confluence of the Bhairavi and Damodar rivers.
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Rankini Temple
This place is situated in Jadugora of Potka block. The temple of Rankini, it is said was formerly situated on a rock where human sacrifices used to be offered to her, the belief being that the Goddess herself killed the victims. The priests during those days mainly hailed from Bhumij Caste.
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Jai Vilas Mahal
The Jai Vilas Mahal that is also known as the Jai Vilas Palace was built in 1874 by the Maharaja of Gwalior called Jayajirao Scindia. This palace is said to be an 11th century palace and a visit to this palace must be done if you visit Gwalior.
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Gwalior Fort
The Gwalior fort that is situated on a magnificent sandstone hill was once the administrative quarters of the Tomars. The Gwaluor fort is said to have been a part of the revolt during 1857 and during that period, the fort was under the ruling of Tantia Tope and also Rani Laxmibai.
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Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal is one of the Seven Wonders of the World. It is situated on the bank of river yamuna in the city of Agra (India). Taj is a symbol of the great Mughal heritage of India. Taj Mahal monument is a symbol of the eternity of love. Experiencing Taj Mahal Monument is like a journey back to the magnificent Mughal Empire. It is simply the expression of emotions in a structural form. Taj Mahal is a monument of love. So, it's a place worth visiting to memorize the love in your life. The Taj Mahal monument was built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in 1631 as a tribute to his loving wife Mumtaz Mahal.
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Ram Bagh
Ram Bagh was one of the ancient Persian styled Mughal gardens of Agra. This garden was well maintained for several centuries under the control of Mughal dynasty until Marathas and then, British took over the garden. Today, most of the parts of this garden is in ruins. However, the greenery and lush vegetation of the land attracts tourists to it. This is the oldest Mughal garden and one of the eminent Persian styled Mughal gardens of the land. This land stands as the example of architectural skill of Nur Jahan, mother of Shah Jahan (builder of Taj Mahal). If you are visiting in summer months, this garden is really a paradise. The water channels provide cool breeze, which allows you to rest despite the scorching sun. The garden represent the Islamic version of heaven and this model is incorporated in many Mughal structures, which were built later on.
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Itmad-ud-Daulah's Tomb
Itmad-ud-Daulah's tomb is a highly ornate edifice, which is looked upon as an imminent precursor of the Taj Mahal as far as elaborate carvings and inlay work are concerned. The tomb marks a significant departure from the tombs of the Mughal dynasty built before its construction. The tomb of Itmad-ud-Daulah is as interesting as the life of the person for whom it was built. Mirza Ghiyas-ud-din or Ghiyas Beg (later known as Itmad-ud-Daulah) was a poor merchant and lived in Persia (modern-day Iran). While on his way to India for business, his wife gave birth to a baby girl. As the family was extremely poor and had nothing to eat, the parents decided to abandon the child. However, the wails of the baby girl forced the parents to come back and take her with them. The baby girl brought a stroke of good luck to her parents, for Ghiyas Beg found a caravan that straightaway took him to the court of the great Mughal Emperor, Akbar. In the course of time, Ghiyas Beg rose to become a minister and a trusted treasurer in Akbar's court. After Akbar's death in 1605, his son Jahangir became the Mughal emperor, who made Ghiyas Beg his chief minister or Wazir. Ghiyas Beg was also honored with the title of Itmad-ud-Daulah or the pillar of the state.
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Chini ka Rauza
Chini ka Rauza is also called as the China Tomb of Agra. This mausoleum belong to a Persian born poet, who rose to the position of Wazir (Prime Minister) during the reign of Shah Jahan. Mullah died in 1639 in Lahore. His remains were brought back to Agra, to be buried in this spot. Just like every other mausoleum of Mughals, the tomb is built to face the holy city of Mecca. This Mughal structure has many exotic and unusual styles of architecture. The main dissimilarity is the un-proportional dome built in Sultanate style. However, the beauty of the tomb has heavily disintegrated with passage of time. The walls of the monument have worn out, but you can still see the striking enamel colors on the tiles and remains of what used to be a grand ceiling painting. The builders of the tomb used earthen pots to reduce the weight of concrete filling in the facades. This method is widely used in Egypt and Rome.
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Agra Fort
The city of Agra is world famous for the Taj Mahal, built by the Mughal emperor Shahjahan in memory of his beloved wife. However, it is also famous for the Agra Fort, which is a veritable treasure trove of the Mughal architectural tradition. The various buildings within this sprawling fort complex represent the assimilation of different cultures, which was the mark of the Mughal period. Jahangiri Mahal (Jahangir's Palace),
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Dayal Bagh
India is a place inhabited by the people of different sects and religions. Radha Swami is also a faith followed by many people in India. Dayal Bagh is 15 km from Agra. It is a place, which houses the Samadhi of the founder of the Radha Swami, "Swamiji Maharaj. The main structure is a magnificent building of 110 feet in height, built in pure white marble. One can find pietra- dura inlaid marble work actually being worked on. The building here is under construction since last 100 years and here it is a belief that construction should never stop.
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Akbar Tomb
Akbar's tomb at Sikandra is an excellent example of assimilation of different styles of architecture and it represents a significant departure from the earlier Mughal buildings. The tomb carries the characteristic flavor of the airy tiered pavilions of the Agra Fort and Fatehpur Sikri.
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Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri was the imperial city of the Mughal dynasty between 1571 and 1584. Built by the Mughal emperor Akbar, this royal city is one of a kind. The architectural grandeur of this deserted city cannot be described in words and one can only experience the aura of its magnificent edifices by seeing them.
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Udayagiri and Khandagiri
The caves, 6 km from West of Bhubaneswar city centre, were chiseled out for the ascetic Jain monks, also has some inscriptions describing the exploits of king Kharavel.
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Lingaraj Temple
One of the oldest temples (late 8th century), its striking feature is the shape of its sanctuary tower. The semi cylindrical shape of its roof, a leading example of khakhara order of temples, bears an affinity to the Dravidian gopuram of the South India temples.
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Lotus Temple
Its one of the most visited attractions of India, it has been recorded that this place has daily 10000 visitors and almost 4 millions of tourists have visited Lotus Temple! Being a central highlight of Delhi, Lotus Temple is one of those religious attractions that bring all the religions together as its chief philosophy accepts every religion with an open heart. This monument was accomplished in 1986 and is a foremost site to visit in Delhi. It is built in the shape of a lotus and is stunning in its architecture and structural design which can blow anyone’s mind! Lotus Temple is ideal to visit during the winter and springtime of October to March as the scorching heat of summers is not idyllic for traveling in Delhi.
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Humayun's Tomb
This tomb, built in 1570, is of particular cultural significance as it was the first garden-tomb on the Indian subcontinent. It inspired several major architectural innovations, culminating in the construction of the Taj Mahal. Humayun’s Tomb, Delhi is the first of the grand dynastic mausoleums that were to become synonyms of Mughal architecture with the architectural style reaching its zenith 80 years later at the later Taj Mahal. Humayun’s Tomb stands within a complex of 27.04 ha. that includes other contemporary, 16th century Mughal garden-tombs such as Nila Gumbad, Isa Khan, Bu Halima, Afsarwala, Barber’s Tomb and the complex where the craftsmen employed for the Building of Humayun’s Tomb stayed, the Arab Serai. Humayun’s Tomb was built in the 1560’s, with the patronage of Humayun’s son, the great Emperor Akbar. Persian and Indian craftsmen worked together to build the garden-tomb, far grander than any tomb built before in the Islamic world. Humayun’s garden-tomb is an example of the charbagh (a four quadrant garden with the four rivers of Quranic paradise represented), with pools joined by channels. The garden is entered from lofty gateways on the south and from the west with pavilions located in the centre of the eastern and northern walls.
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Purana Qila
One of the top places to see in Delhi, the Purana Qila or the Old Fort has a lot in store for its visitors. It was built under Sher Shah Suri and is considered to be the capital of the Pandavas. Stretched across two kilometers in length, the huge red sandstone ramparts of the fort emphasize on the historical valor and aura of the times the fort must have witnessed.
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Qutb Minar
Built in the early 13th century a few kilometres south of Delhi, the red sandstone tower of Qutb Minar is 72.5 m high, tapering from 2.75 m in diameter at its peak to 14.32 m at its base, and alternating angular and rounded flutings. The surrounding archaeological area contains funerary buildings, notably the magnificent Alai-Darwaza Gate, the masterpiece of Indo-Muslim art (built in 1311), and two mosques, including the Quwwatu'l-Islam, the oldest in northern India, built of materials reused from some 20 Brahman temples.
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India Gate
At the centre of New Delhi stands the 42 m high India Gate, an "Arc-de-Triomphe" like archway in the middle of a crossroad. Almost similar to its French counterpart, it commemorates the 70,000 Indian soldiers who lost their lives fighting for the British Army during the World War I. The memorial bears the names of more than 13,516 British and Indian soldiers killed in the Northwestern Frontier in the Afghan war of 1919. The foundation stone of India Gate was laid by His Royal Highness, the Duke of Connaught in 1921 and it was designed by Edwin Lutyens. The monument was dedicated to the nation 10 years later by the then Viceroy, Lord Irwin. Another memorial, Amar Jawan Jyoti was added much later, after India got its independence. The eternal flame burns day and night under the arch to remind the nation of soldiers who laid down their lives in the Indo-Pakistan War of December 1971. During nightfall, India Gate is dramatically floodlit while the fountains nearby make a lovely display with coloured lights. India Gate stands at one end of Rajpath, and the area surrounding it is generally referred to as 'India Gate'. Surrounding the imposing structure is a large expanse of lush green lawns, which is a popular picnic spot. One can see hoards of people moving about the brightly lit area and on the lawns on summer evenings.
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Red Fort
The Red sandstone walls of the massive Red Fort (Lal Qila) rise 33-m above the clamour of Old Delhi as a reminder of the magnificent power and pomp of the Mughal emperors. The walls, built in 1638, were designed to keep out invaders, now they mainly keep out the noise and confusion of the city.