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Architecture in New Orleans

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Bourbon Street
This street is a tourism destination for a reason. It’s a thoroughfare with an utterly fascinating history, home to some of the oldest bars, family-run restaurants and gay entertainment districts in the country. In short, while there’s plenty to discover off of Bourbon, there’s a lot to discover on the iconic street as well that may surprise those travelers who turn their nose up at all the flashing lights.
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Jackson Square
Historic Jackson Square, originally known in the 18th century as "Place d'Armes," and later renamed in honor of the Battle of New Orleans hero Andrew Jackson, is a timeless attraction in the heart of the French Quarter of New Orleans. This famous landmark facing the Mississippi River is surrounded by historic buildings, including the St. Louis Cathedral, the Presbytere and Cabildo (Louisiana State Museums), not to mention the Lower and Upper Pontalba Apartments, the oldest apartment buildings in the United States. The Pontalba Apartments offer retail shops, museums, galleries and restaurants on the ground level; their second and third floors still house a selection of prestigious apartments. For well over a half-century, there has been an open-air artist colony at Jackson Square. Local artists paint, draw, create portraits, caricatures, and display their work on the square's iron fence. Some have been there for generations! Jackson Square is a favorite site for visitors and locals. The artists, restaurants, museums, merchants and the square itself make Jackson Square one of the French Quarter's most popular destinations.
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Garden District
Love at first sight is a common experience for first time visitors to the Garden District. It often goes something like this: they’re traveling up St. Charles Avenue via the streetcar when they get their first glance of the oak tree lined streets and historic homes. You can tell by the pristine look on their faces, that the Garden District has started a new found romance. The romance blooms as the afternoon is spent exploring memories of New Orleans’ antebellum past, gazing at secluded mansions, wandering down the brick lined sidewalks. Its canopy of oak trees is world-famous, while its characteristic gardens of hibiscuses and crepe myrtles, angel trumpets and bougainvillea, make it one of New Orleans' most beautiful neighborhoods. The Garden District has worked its magic again.
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Royal Street
For a full 13 blocks, Royal Street runs parallel to Bourbon Street, yet this thoroughfare – one of the finest stretches of art galleries, antique stores, wrought iron balconies, restaurants and architecture in the USA – is sometimes almost completely missed by visitors. This is a real shame; beyond the qualities we’ve just described, Royal Street makes a nice counterbalance to the neon and noise of Bourbon.
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St. Louis Cathedral
Facing Jackson Square and flanked by the historic Cabildo on one side and the equally historic Presbytere on the other, St. Louis Cathedral is among the tallest and most imposing structures in the French Quarter. And one of the most recognizable.
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Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum
Established to provide and sustain a publicly accessible center for the collection, preservation, and interpretation of the material culture, cultural landscapes and vernacular architecture of Louisiana and the Lower Mississippi River Valley. Visitors see how the settlers of Louisiana established an admirable society in spite of great odds, gain insight into the difficulties faced by their ancestors, and learn why Louisianans are a unique people with roots from many parts of the world. Tour 32 historic buildings within the Museum Complex, and the historic Windrush Gardens.
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L'Auberge Casino
Featuring a single-level, 30,000-square-foot gaming floor with 1,500 slot machines and 51 table games, including a poker room; a hotel with 205 guestrooms and a rooftop pool. The casino also includes a multi-purpose event center with concert seating for up to 1,400 people or banquet seating for up to 800 people, a covered parking garage, unique dining options and entertainment venues overlooking the Mississippi River.
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Magnolia Mound Plantation
A 1792 French Creole plantation house authentically restored with outbuildings and gardens covering 15 acres. This landmark is a unique southern Louisiana landmark because of its age, quality of restoration, and outstanding collections. Magnolia Mound's mission is to illustrate and interpret the lifestyle of the French Creoles through educational programs, workshops, lectures, festivals, and other special events. The property includes a historic museum house, an open-hearth kitchen, overseer's house, quarter house, crop garden pigeonnier and carriage house.
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Louisiana Governor's Mansion
Built in 1963 when Jimmy Davis was Governor of Louisiana, the Mansion is located on Capitol Lake near the State Capitol. Because so many antebellum mansions were being destroyed by fire and neglect, Gov. and Mrs. Davis instructed the architects to design a mansion in the Greek Revival style, which was the dominant style in Louisiana after 1830. This period marks a distinct departure from earlier Louisiana architecture. The Mansion contains a total of 25,000 square feet of space in three floors and a basement.
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The Red Stick Sculpture
This Baton Rouge landmark is a commemorative sculpture by the late SU Alumni Frank Hayden, erected on the Southern University Baton Rouge campus to mark the site of the famous exchange on Scott's Bluff that gave the city of Baton Rouge its name, meaning "Red Stick" in French. Wondering what "Baton Rouge" means? The story has it that long ago, this area in Louisiana along the mighty Mississippi River was occupied by two indigenous tribes, the Houma Indian Tribe and the Bayougoula Indian Tribe. To settle a border conflict between them, the tribes used a cypress pole to mark the boundary dividing their hunting grounds at an area now known as Scott’s Bluff. This marker on the east bank of the Mississippi River caught the eye of French-Canadian explorer Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville while making his way upriver during an exploration in 1699. He and his men saw the bloodied cypress pole on the bluff, adorned with animal parts and stained red from the tribes’ latest haul, and dubbed the area "le bâton rouge," French for "Red Stick". In 1810, the area became part of the colonies and in 1817, the town was officially incorporated as “Baton Rouge.” Locals still lovingly refer to the city as "The Red Stick."
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Buffalo Soldier National Museum
Come and visit the historical Buffalo Soldier National Museum and learn more about not only African American history but American history as well. The goal of the Buffalo Soldier Museum is to interpret articulate collect display and preserve historical artifacts documents videos prints and other historical memorabilia which details the history of the brave men and women who overcame extreme adversity while gallantly fighting the great American wars.
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Hines Waterwall Park
Houston’s most photographed site, this dramatic 64-foot U-shaped fountain has water rushing down its inside and outside walls. Designed and created in 1985 by the internationally acclaimed architectural team of Philip Johnson and John Burgee, the Water Wall pumps 78,500 gallons of recycled water every three hours and 20 minutes. More than 180 live oaks shade the three-acre area that plays host to families and couples out for a stroll, picnic, or even a game of Frisbee.
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Fox Theatre
Known to locals as "The Fox", this exotic styled downtown landmark brings Atlanta the best in performance entertainment including Broadway shows, the Atlanta Ballet, Billboard's top music concert tours, and its original purpose: classic feature films. Travel back in time to 1929 as you ascend stone staircases, down steel freight elevators, and gaze up as "clouds" drift across an Arabian night sky to see why The Fox is #2 on the list of Things To Do in Atlanta. An interior design aficionado? A fan of globally inspired architecture? Or interested in historical buildings that almost became a concrete parking lot? Take a guided tour through this immaculate theatre's story of rising from the ashes (literally), and see the world's second-largest theatre organ Mighty Mo as well as men's and women's lounge areas straight out of the Jazz Era.
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High Museum of Art
From a stately home on Peachtree Street to its current award-winning buildings in a spectacular setting, the High Museum of Art in Midtown Atlanta has become the leading art museum in the Southeastern United States. The High boasts a celebrated collection of classic to contemporary art, as well as renowned architecture by Richard Meier and Renzo Piano. With a dynamic schedule of special exhibitions, an extensive collection, innovative educational and family programs, meeting and event facilities, the Museum Shop, and several dining options, there is something for everyone at the High.
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Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum
The Museum of the Jimmy Carter Library provides a unique experience for the visitor. Through immersive exhibitions of objects, documents, and photographs, videos, and beautiful gifts from world leaders, visitors can get a close-up view of the modern American Presidency. Highlights include a life-size replica of the Oval Office, a dramatic “Day in the Life of the President” presentation on 13 ft. screens, a walk-through cabin setting for the crucial Camp David Meetings exhibition, and an Interactive Map Table that takes you with the Carters to monitor elections and fight diseases. The Presidential Library is nestled between two lakes on 30 acres of parkland and provides a tranquil setting with a view of the Atlanta skyline. Changing exhibits are drawn from the library and museum collection or are based on themes relating to the presidency and American history.
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The Atlanta History Center
The Atlanta History Center is located in one of Atlanta’s most vibrant neighborhoods where the stories, mysteries and crusades of our region thrive. Our 33-acre experience features award-winning exhibitions, historic houses, enchanting gardens, interactive activities and a variety of year-round adult and family programs.
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John F. Kennedy Memoria
Phillip Johnson, a Kennedy family friend, constructed this stark and simple memorial to the late president. Located in the Dallas County Historical Plaza, this site is visited by hundreds of thousands of people annually.
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American Airlines Center
American Airlines Center is home to the Dallas Mavericks professional basketball team and the Dallas Stars professional hockey team. The AA Center was designed by David M. Schwarz/Architectural Services, Inc. and HKS, Inc. The team combined architecture and technology to give Dallas a beautiful, fan friendly venue with lots of hi-tech touches.
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Elisabet Ney Museum
The Elisabet Ney Museum is the historic 1892 Austin studio of European-born sculptor and activist Elisabet Ney (1833-1907). It features her own work—large scale classical style portraits of 19th-century European intellectuals, statesmen, and royalty, as well as Texas notables—and exhibitions of contemporary art, both on the grounds and inside the building. Part of the 2.5 acre site features a historic prairie recreation. Admission is free and events are held year-round.
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The Mexican American Cultural Center
The Mexican American Cultural Center is dedicated to the preservation, creation, presentation, and promotion of Mexican American cultural arts and heritage.
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Gainesville Community Playhouse
The Gainesville Community Playhouse is one of the oldest community theatre in the state of Florida. Its first play, The Pied Piper of Hamlin, was produced in 1927 and have been producing quality plays and musicals ever since. In 2006, Gainesville Community Playhouse moved into our present facility, the magnificent Vam York Theater, a 210-seat house with facilities to stage the most demanding musicals and plays.
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Cade Museum for Creativity & Invention
The Cade Museum for Creativity & Invention, located at 811 South Main Street, is a museum of ideas. The question is not what you will see but what will you imagine and create. Dr. James Robert Cade, a kidney specialist at the University of Florida, was best known as the leader of the research team that invented Gatorade in 1965. In 2004, Dr. Cade and his family established The Cade Museum Foundation in an effort to design and build a 26,000 square foot museum in Gainesville, Florida. The mission of the museum is to transform communities by inspiring and equipping future inventors, entrepreneurs, and visionaries. The Cade Museum for Creativity & Invention offers interactive activities in the Creativity and Fab Labs, hands-on learning in the rotunda, Studebaker Sundays, outdoor educational activities, travelling exhibits, and much, much, more. Cade programming and events are designed to engage guests in “purposeful creativity,” the kind that leads to great inventions, new businesses, and ideas that change the world
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The Parthenon
The worlds only full-scale reproduction of the famous Greek temple, Nashville's Parthenon stands in Centennial Park and features both the citys art museum and Athena Parthenos. At almost 42 feet in height, Athena Parthenos is the tallest indoor sculpture in the Western world.
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Ryman Auditorium
Your visit to this famous National Historic Landmark begins with, “Soul of Nashville,” a new state-of-the-art theater experience that puts you at the center of the Ryman’s fascinating history as more than a century of legendary performances come to life on all around you.
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Ball-Eddleman-McFarland House
Built in 1899, Ball-Eddleman-McFarland House is Fort Worth's premier example of Queen Anne-style Victorian architecture. Turrets, gables, copper finials, a slate tile roof and a porch of red sandstone and marble highlight the late-Victorian exterior. The interior includes original ornate oak mantles, cornices, coffered ceilings, paneling and parquet floors. The house is available for individual and group tours.
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The Straz Center for the Performing Arts
The Straz Center for the Performing Arts provides world-class entertainment, ranging from lavish Broadway shows to classical music and rock concerts. It is the largest facility of its kind in the Southeastern United States.
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Henry B. Plant Museum
The Henry B. Plant Museum is housed in the 1891 Tampa Bay Hotel, the Victorian railroad resort that defined the elegant frontier, now a National Historic Landmark. Unlike most museums dedicated to lifestyles of the past, it contains the actual furnishings enjoyed by the first guests to visit here. The Museum accurately reflects the opulence of turn-of-the-century America and the vision of American transportation pioneer, Henry B. Plant. The Museum seeks to transport the visitor through educational exhibits and events to the late Victorian period, the beginning of Florida’s tourist industry, and the early years of the city of Tampa.
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The Alamo
The 300-year-old Mission San Antonio de Valero was the site of a pinnacle battle during the Texas Revolution March of 1836. Here, 189 defenders held off Mexican General Santa Anna's 4,000 soldiers for 13 days.
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Spanish Missions
he chain of missions established along the San Antonio River in the 18th century is a reminder of one of Spain's most successful attempts to extend its New World dominion from Mexico.
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Brady Theater
Fondly nicknamed the “Old Lady on Brady,” this 100-year-old theater is on the National Register of Historic Places and has played host to countless big-name performers, including Journey, Kansas, B.B. King, Will Rogers, Robin Williams and Randy Travis. Today, it anchors the bustling Brady Arts District and stands as one of the greatest monuments to Tulsa’s rich cultural heritage.
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The Civic Center Music Hall
The Civic Center Music Hall is owned and operated by the City of Oklahoma City and is nationally recognized as one of the country's premier acoustic performing arts facilities. Inside our doors are three theatres, a grand reception hall, multiple suites and smaller rental facilities.
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Cardinals Hall of Fame and Museum
Where Cardinals past and present combine to create an unforgettable experience. As the official home for St. Louis Cardinals legends, the Cardinals Hall of Fame & Museum is already considered a "must-see" attraction. Created to honor the players and personalities who have impacted the franchise, the museum features stadiums, players, championship moments and one of the world's largest team-specific collections of artifacts and memorabilia.
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Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis
One of the largest mosaic collections in the western hemisphere; museum and shop. Daily for Masses and tours.
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Bissell Mansion Restaurant and Dinner Theatre
St. Louis' oldest brick home is located just five minutes from the Gateway Arch. Enjoy the original participatory comedy/murder mystery served with a four-course meal to DIE for on Friday, Saturday or Sunday. Private shows available any day/evening including weekends.
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Paseo Montejo
Walk along the traditional Paseo Montejo to admire the old houses of the Porfiriato accompanied by large trees which project their playful silhouettes on the wide paved sidewalks.
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El Meco
At Km 2.7 of the Puerto Juárez - Punta Sam highway north of Cancun, is El Meco. On the site you can see 14 structures with a main temple: El Castillo, which is a pyramid of five levels.
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Chichen Itza
Chichen Itza is probably the most important city of the Mayan Culture in the Yucatan peninsula and has the most amazing buildings of any other Mayan ancient cities. Chichen Itza is also the largest and most impressive of the Mayan ruins, is an spectacular and mystical place to visit, if you only want to do one day trip during your vacation in Cancun, this should be this one. Chichen-Itza (chee-chehn eet-sah) in Maya, was a sacred city of the Itza and the name literally means: "Mouth of the well of the Itza". Located 75 miles east of Merida, the capital of the State of Yucatan, Mexico; it covers an area of approximately six square miles where hundreds of buildings once stood. Now most are mounds but more than thirty may still be seen by tourists. The ruins of Chichen Itza are divided into two groups. One group belongs to the classic Maya Period and was built between the 7th and 10th centuries A.D., at which time the city became a prominent ceremonial center. The other group corresponds to the Maya-Toltec Period, from the later part of the 10th century to the beginning of the 13th century A.D. This area includes the Sacred Well and most of the outstanding ruins.
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NASCAR Hall of Fame
Conveniently located in Uptown Charlotte, North Carolina, the NASCAR Hall of Fame is an interactive entertainment attraction honoring the history and heritage of NASCAR. The high-tech venue, designed to educate and entertain race fans and non-fans alike, opened May 11, 2010, and includes artifacts, hands-on exhibits, a 278-person state-of-the-art theater, Hall of Honor, Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant, NASCAR Hall of Fame Gear Shop, NASCAR Productions-operated broadcast studio and an attached parking garage on Brevard Street. The 5-acre site also includes a privately developed 19-story office tower and 102,000-square-foot expansion to the Charlotte Convention Center, highlighted by a 40,000-square-foot ballroom. The NASCAR Hall of Fame is owned by the City of Charlotte, licensed by NASCAR and operated by the Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority. The goal of the facility is to honor NASCAR icons and create an enduring tribute to the drivers, crew members, team owners and others that have impacted the sport in the past, present and future.