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Adventure in Bora Bora

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Matira Beach
Matira Beach is a mile of exquisite white sand at the southern tip of Bora Bora Island. When you visit, you will understand why it is Bora Bora's most popular public beach. It stretches from Hotel Bora Bora (currently closed for renovations) to Matira Point and is framed from behind by lush palms and green hills. To each side, there are more long strips of privately owned beaches. Often described as the most beautiful beach in the world, Matira Beach is actually the only public beach on the main island that is worth a visit. It is so gorgeous that it is in our list of the best things to do in Bora Bora! Everybody is welcome on this expanse of sand. There is a fun atmosphere that offers natural shade from palm trees, safe swimming and easy snorkelling.
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Mount Otemanu
Mount Otemanu on Bora Bora island is a jagged remnant of an ancient volcano that rises up to a sharp point at 2,385 feet (727 m) from the surface of a turquoise blue lagoon. The French Polynesian islands, in general, are blessed with some incredible picture-perfect sceneries but Mount Otemanu takes the crown. There is something very magical about this unique landform that can be seen from every part of the island. Thousands of people are drawn to Bora Bora every year because it is one of the most beautiful islands on earth. Most resorts have designed their overwater bungalows to specifically face Mount Otemanu and rooms that have unobstructed views typically come with a premium price tag.
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Mount Pahia
Mount Pahia is the second-highest summit on Bora Bora and the challenging hike leading up to it features steep jungle climbs on faint trails with spectacular views all around the island and lagoon. Difficulties encountered on the hike include arranging for a hiking guide, avoiding hiking during times of rainy weather (because the trail will become muddy, slippery, and dangerous), dealing with heat and humidity, watching out for rockfall while passing along the base of cliffs, and using ropes and safety gear during areas of exposure if passing beyond the summit of Mount Ohue.
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Natural Aquarium
View a variety of marine life in the shallow lagoon waters. After a brief safety demonstration, you will be able to view these animals from an observation platform or you may choose to descend underwater for a close-up encounter with these friendly lagoon inhabitants.
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Opunohu Bay
Opunohu Bay, Moorea, French Polynesia. Moorea is one of the most beautiful islands in Pacific.
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Mount Tohivea
Mount Tohivea is the highest point in Moorea at 3960ft and is a dormant volcano. This mountain is clearly visible from Tahiti. Tohivea is depicted on the back of the 50f Polynesie Francaise coin. James Michener made Moorea famous, claiming that it was the most beautiful island in the South Pacific.
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Bougainville Park
Bougainville Park is a tranquil, tropical oasis in the middle of the Papeete's concrete jungle. Stretching from Boulevard Pomare to Rue du General de Gaulle, it makes for a lush and cool picnic (or roulettes take-away) spot. If you're traveling with the kids there's a playground here, and there are often floral, cultural and artistic displays on the grounds.
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Aorai Mountain
The Aorai is Tahiti’s third highest mountain and peaks at 2066 metres: you will hike up to the 1st mountain hut at an altitude of 1400 metres. Of breath and a good physical condition are required for this 800m vertical drop hike. Enjoy some breathtaking views of Tahiti, the ocean and surrounding valleys.
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Faarumai Waterfalls
Tahiti is home to some of the most beautiful hiking trails in Polynesia. Stops can include spectacular waterfalls and natural pools, panoramic views, grottos, archeological sites and lava tubes. A favorite hike is to the three Faarumai waterfalls. From the car park it is a quick scramble through a forest of chestnut trees to the first waterfall, Vaimahutu. Continue on for another 20 minutes or so to reach the other to falls Haamarere Iti and Haamarere Rahi, which are almost side-by-side. With hundreds of varieties of tropical trees, plants and flowers, Tahiti also has some of the world's most beautiful gardens. Visit the water gardens of Vaipahi to experience the abundant flora and waterfalls that flow directly into Lake Vaihiria.
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Lavatubes
Moderately difficult "Canyoning" hike visiting lava channels that were formed during the volcanic period when the island was born.
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Maui Beach
Maui Beach is a rare white sand beach in Tahiti. It can get very crowded on weekends, but is peaceful during weekdays. It located right on the road but has shallow swimming, making it perfect for kids, as well as deeper spots for adults and some DIY snorkeling off the reef.
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Teahupoo
Tahiti is known for having one of the most dangerous surf breaks in the world, Teahupo’o. Its waves are big and powerful, and it breaks right onto the razor sharp reef. Tahiti’s best waves occur during the winter months of May to October.
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Ninamu Resort
The Ninamu Resort is hidden away on a private island in the southwest corner of Tikehau, just ten minutes by boat from the airport. Surrounded by pink sand beaches, abundant marine life, impeccable waves and prevailing trade winds, this secluded retreat is the ultimate paradise for every type of water sports enthusiast.
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Tikehau Pearl Beach Resort
The Tikehau Pearl Beach Resort can be found on a secluded, pink beach fringed with palm trees at the southeast end of the atoll. Located fifteen minutes by boat from the airport and the main village of Tuherahera, this hotel serves as the ideal home base for any and all leisurely activities including kayaking, snorkeling and biking. It even has its own dive center on site, making it easy to arrange your daily excursions.
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Bird Island
Venture across the lagoon with your guide to the tiny islet known as Bird Island. This bird watcher`s paradise provides the opportunity to view many unique avian species in their natural island habitat.
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The Blue Lagoon
Experience one of the most popular attractions in Rangiroa. The Blue Lagoon is a natural pool formed by a string of islets and coral reefs on the edge of the main reef - a lagoon within a lagoon.
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The Pink Sand Beach
The Pink Sand Beach, located at the extreme southeast part of Rangiroa, is worth seeing both for the destination and for the route leading to it. Your adventure begins with a boat trip of about two hours with the ocean and an endless sky as your backdrop.
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The Garuae Pass
Fakarava is one of the world's best diving destinations. There are two notable passes that feed into the lagoon. The first is the Garuae Pass, located on the north side, which is the widest navigable pass in French Polynesia.
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Hanatekuua Beach
You’ll be thanking whoever made the smart decision to come to Hiva Oa when you see Hanatekuua for the first time. This dream of a beach seems to be caressed by the palms of a giant hand.
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Piula Cave Pools
Along the main east coast road, 45mins from apia, you will find piula cave pool located at the piula theological college in the village of lufilufi. It’s a beautiful crystal clear freshwater spring pool and cave that originated from an old lava tube. Explore the underwater cave that connects to a second cave. Day fales and toilet facilities available. Open mon-sat: 8am-4pm.
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Papase'ea Sliding Rocks
Papase’ea sliding rocks are situated in se’ese’e in the faleata district approx. 15mins drive from apia. Brave mother nature’s waterslides and slide down these naturally formed rock slides, worn down by thousands of years of running water. Toilets and change rooms are available. Open mon-sat.
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Afu Aau Waterfalls,
This spectacular waterfall in south-eastern savaii plunges from the rainforest deep into a fresh-water swimming pool. The Afu Aau Waterfall also known as Olemoe Falls, is a spectacular waterfall in south-eastern Savaii that plunges from the rainforest deep into a fresh-water swimming pool. Access is on a dirt road which is maintained by the village. Entrance fees are collected at the Samoan fale about 650m from the main road and visitors are encouraged to park their car here and enjoy a 10 minute walk to the pool and waterfall.
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Alofaaga Blowholes
These impressive blowholes in the village of taga on south-west savaii are wave power in its purest form, as they propel a roaring jet of water hundreds of feet up into the air. They are particularly worth watching when locals throw coconuts into the holes and these are blasted into the air as well
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Mud Pool
Hot spring water combines with volcanic ash to form a mud bath pool. Mud baths have existed for thousands of years and found in spas around the world including Fiji. The mud bath treatment is used as a way to relieve arthritis. To take full advantage of the therapeutic value of the mud pools you first coat yourself in mud then stand in the sun until it drys. Wash off in the first natural hot spring pool then walk over to the next clear water pool for another cleansing. Both places offer cheap and very good massage. Pool temperatures are warm to hot.
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Action Stations
Action Stations provides nature and cultural based experiences in the Tauranga region and beyond, including around the upper half of the North Island of NZ.
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Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary
While staying at Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary, a 16-acre nature park, feed the unique Mount Tutu Sheep which are a closed flock of Heritage Sheep. The preservation of heritage flocks is considered to be very important. Mount Tutu Sheep, unique to Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary, are characterised by their majestic horns and piebald markings. They have been selectively bred over 18 years. The lambs look like little panda bears, and are equally as cuddly! Get up close and personal with these special sheep!
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Waimarino Adventure Park
Bring your family, swimsuits, barbecue supplies or picnic and make a day of it with one of our two adventure park pass options, or if you’re short on time, come down and rent a kayak by the hour. Our adventure park pass system is designed so once you have purchased a pass for the park you won’t need any more money for the rest of the day. You can enjoy, get wet, relax and most importantly have fun, without needing to reach for your wallet. Enter the park knowing that the day is yours to enjoy with our supreme pass. The Blob, The UFO, rock climbing and unlimited kayak hire; the fun is just starting. Slide down NZ’s only kayak slide. Beach volleyball is a hit while others enjoy the challenge on Waimarino’s new low ropes course.
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Waimangu Volcanic Valley
Experience spectacular volcanic craters, enormous hot water springs, beautiful geothermal features, rare and unusual plant life, brilliantly coloured micro biology and a wide array of birds. We immerse visitors in the stories of the Mt Tarawera volcanic eruption, its people, and the resulting dramatic landscape changes that created the world’s youngest geothermal valley Treat yourself to some of the best walking trails in Rotorua, set amongst awe-inspiring volcanic craters and incredible geothermal activity. Choose from a range of self-guided nature walks and hiking trails, mostly down hill, through pristine New Zealand bush. Included with your entrance fee is a guide sheet, available in many different languages, to refer to for interpretation as you make your way through our wonderful valley.
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Lake Rotorua
A number of the Rotorua lakes were named by Ihenga, a grandson of the captain of the Arawa canoe Tamatekapua.Lake Rotorua is the largest lake in the district and the most productive trout fishery in New Zealand.
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Skyline Rotorua Luge and Gondola
Skyline Rotorua Gondola is the most spectacular way to take in the 180-degree views of Lake Rotorua, the city and surrounding district. Skyline’s Stratosfare Restaurant and Bar, open daily for lunch and dinner, is renowned for its delicious New Zealand cuisine, and the Market Kitchen provides a multitude of tasty options for morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea. No visit would be complete without a ride down one of Skyline’s luge tracks. The luge is a world first! With three different track options and over 5kms of track to ride, once is certainly never enough! Riders have full control, over the 3 wheels, gravity-based luge cart.
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Skyline gravity park
Skyline Rotorua is now home to New Zealand's first year-round Gondola assisted bike lift, accessing world-class downhill mountain biking. Skyline Rotorua MTB Gravity Park gives riders easy access to an 8.5-kilometre trail network featuring trails with varying terrain for all ability levels.
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Bream Head Scenic Reserve
Bream Head Scenic Reserves is a coastal forest reserve. It is a rich archaeological landscape resulting from more than 500 years of Māori occupation. The reserve is located at the tip of the Whangarei Heads Peninsula. Giant peaks tower at the entrance to the Whangarei Harbour with the Majestic Mt Lion at an impressive 476 meters. An array of walking and hiking trails have been developed throughout the entire forest – from easy walking to challenging hiking.
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Hawke's Bay Vineyard
Any New Zealand gourmet trail would be incomplete without a visit to Hawke’s Bay, with top vineyards and producers who make the most of the local bounty. Blessed with long sunshine hours and fertile plains, Hawke’s Bay is one of New Zealand’s most productive growing regions. It is also the second largest when it comes to wine production. Wineries and vineyards are dotted throughout Hawke’s Bay, although Gimblett Gravels and Ngatarawa Triangle are two of its most famous wine producing sub-regions. These regions produce a large portion of the Bordeaux blend reds that Hawke’s Bay is revered for. Owing to its geographical diversity, Hawke’s Bay is also capable of producing a number of other varietals to a high standard, including Chardonnay. Hawke’s Bay’s wineries can be explored on leisurely tours – guided tours are available and are a great way to discover the local gems. Another brilliant way to experience the wineries is on a cycle, riding on especially created trails that link towns and wineries. A number of the wineries have cellar doors and many boast superb winery restaurants that make the most of the abundant fresh local produce. Hawke’s Bay also forms part of the Classic New Zealand Wine Trail that takes you to more than 100 cellar doors across four New Zealand regions.
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Matakana Coast
Pick up fresh local and organic produce at the Matakana Farmers’ Market on Saturdays. Browse the art and craft galleries and find everything from paintings by local artists to the renowned Morris & James Pottery.Visit some of the beautiful white-sand beaches along Matakana’s stunning coastline.
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Whangarei Falls
Otuihau Whangarei Falls is a picturesque waterfall, falling vertically for 26.3 metres over basalt cliffs. Three viewing platforms allow easy access to the dramatic views and a circular walk around the falls allows them to be seen from all angles. Traditionally this area was a good eeling spot for the local Māori and around the turn of the century it was known as a popular picnic spot from Whangarei. In the late 1920's Mr Archibald Clapham bought the property, reputedly to prevent the falls being developed as a commercial watermill. In 1946 a local businessmen's association raised the purchase price by public subscription and the property became a public domain.
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Abbey Caves
The Abbey Caves Reserve comprises of naturally sculptured limestone outcrops, bluffs, enclosed depressions, sinkholes and three significant caves, Organ, Middle and Ivy. Two distinct areas of native bush with well established podocarp-hardwood forest include particularly fine specimens of puriri trees. Nathaniel and Amelia Clotworthy settled on 409 acres here in about 1860. Their house in the limestone outcrops resembled an Irish ‘abbey’ leading to the name. The house was destroyed by fire in 1920 but the site is still marked by chimney remains. A grave of one of the Clotworthy children also remains from 1884. The land was bought by the Golden Bay Cement Company as a site to establish a mine, but in 1989 they sold it to the then City Council as a reserve for the people of Whangarei.