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Adventure in Auckland

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Matakana Coast
Pick up fresh local and organic produce at the Matakana Farmers’ Market on Saturdays. Browse the art and craft galleries and find everything from paintings by local artists to the renowned Morris & James Pottery.Visit some of the beautiful white-sand beaches along Matakana’s stunning coastline.
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Bream Head Scenic Reserve
Bream Head Scenic Reserves is a coastal forest reserve. It is a rich archaeological landscape resulting from more than 500 years of Māori occupation. The reserve is located at the tip of the Whangarei Heads Peninsula. Giant peaks tower at the entrance to the Whangarei Harbour with the Majestic Mt Lion at an impressive 476 meters. An array of walking and hiking trails have been developed throughout the entire forest – from easy walking to challenging hiking.
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Abbey Caves
The Abbey Caves Reserve comprises of naturally sculptured limestone outcrops, bluffs, enclosed depressions, sinkholes and three significant caves, Organ, Middle and Ivy. Two distinct areas of native bush with well established podocarp-hardwood forest include particularly fine specimens of puriri trees. Nathaniel and Amelia Clotworthy settled on 409 acres here in about 1860. Their house in the limestone outcrops resembled an Irish ‘abbey’ leading to the name. The house was destroyed by fire in 1920 but the site is still marked by chimney remains. A grave of one of the Clotworthy children also remains from 1884. The land was bought by the Golden Bay Cement Company as a site to establish a mine, but in 1989 they sold it to the then City Council as a reserve for the people of Whangarei.
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Whangarei Falls
Otuihau Whangarei Falls is a picturesque waterfall, falling vertically for 26.3 metres over basalt cliffs. Three viewing platforms allow easy access to the dramatic views and a circular walk around the falls allows them to be seen from all angles. Traditionally this area was a good eeling spot for the local Māori and around the turn of the century it was known as a popular picnic spot from Whangarei. In the late 1920's Mr Archibald Clapham bought the property, reputedly to prevent the falls being developed as a commercial watermill. In 1946 a local businessmen's association raised the purchase price by public subscription and the property became a public domain.
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Waimarino Adventure Park
Bring your family, swimsuits, barbecue supplies or picnic and make a day of it with one of our two adventure park pass options, or if you’re short on time, come down and rent a kayak by the hour. Our adventure park pass system is designed so once you have purchased a pass for the park you won’t need any more money for the rest of the day. You can enjoy, get wet, relax and most importantly have fun, without needing to reach for your wallet. Enter the park knowing that the day is yours to enjoy with our supreme pass. The Blob, The UFO, rock climbing and unlimited kayak hire; the fun is just starting. Slide down NZ’s only kayak slide. Beach volleyball is a hit while others enjoy the challenge on Waimarino’s new low ropes course.
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Action Stations
Action Stations provides nature and cultural based experiences in the Tauranga region and beyond, including around the upper half of the North Island of NZ.
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Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary
While staying at Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary, a 16-acre nature park, feed the unique Mount Tutu Sheep which are a closed flock of Heritage Sheep. The preservation of heritage flocks is considered to be very important. Mount Tutu Sheep, unique to Mount Tutu Eco-Sanctuary, are characterised by their majestic horns and piebald markings. They have been selectively bred over 18 years. The lambs look like little panda bears, and are equally as cuddly! Get up close and personal with these special sheep!
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Skyline Rotorua Luge and Gondola
Skyline Rotorua Gondola is the most spectacular way to take in the 180-degree views of Lake Rotorua, the city and surrounding district. Skyline’s Stratosfare Restaurant and Bar, open daily for lunch and dinner, is renowned for its delicious New Zealand cuisine, and the Market Kitchen provides a multitude of tasty options for morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea. No visit would be complete without a ride down one of Skyline’s luge tracks. The luge is a world first! With three different track options and over 5kms of track to ride, once is certainly never enough! Riders have full control, over the 3 wheels, gravity-based luge cart.
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Skyline gravity park
Skyline Rotorua is now home to New Zealand's first year-round Gondola assisted bike lift, accessing world-class downhill mountain biking. Skyline Rotorua MTB Gravity Park gives riders easy access to an 8.5-kilometre trail network featuring trails with varying terrain for all ability levels.
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Lake Rotorua
A number of the Rotorua lakes were named by Ihenga, a grandson of the captain of the Arawa canoe Tamatekapua.Lake Rotorua is the largest lake in the district and the most productive trout fishery in New Zealand.
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Waimangu Volcanic Valley
Experience spectacular volcanic craters, enormous hot water springs, beautiful geothermal features, rare and unusual plant life, brilliantly coloured micro biology and a wide array of birds. We immerse visitors in the stories of the Mt Tarawera volcanic eruption, its people, and the resulting dramatic landscape changes that created the world’s youngest geothermal valley Treat yourself to some of the best walking trails in Rotorua, set amongst awe-inspiring volcanic craters and incredible geothermal activity. Choose from a range of self-guided nature walks and hiking trails, mostly down hill, through pristine New Zealand bush. Included with your entrance fee is a guide sheet, available in many different languages, to refer to for interpretation as you make your way through our wonderful valley.
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Huka Falls
The sheer volume of water flowing over the falls amounts to 220,000 litres per second - enough to fill one Olympic sized swimming pool in 11 seconds!
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Hawke's Bay Vineyard
Any New Zealand gourmet trail would be incomplete without a visit to Hawke’s Bay, with top vineyards and producers who make the most of the local bounty. Blessed with long sunshine hours and fertile plains, Hawke’s Bay is one of New Zealand’s most productive growing regions. It is also the second largest when it comes to wine production. Wineries and vineyards are dotted throughout Hawke’s Bay, although Gimblett Gravels and Ngatarawa Triangle are two of its most famous wine producing sub-regions. These regions produce a large portion of the Bordeaux blend reds that Hawke’s Bay is revered for. Owing to its geographical diversity, Hawke’s Bay is also capable of producing a number of other varietals to a high standard, including Chardonnay. Hawke’s Bay’s wineries can be explored on leisurely tours – guided tours are available and are a great way to discover the local gems. Another brilliant way to experience the wineries is on a cycle, riding on especially created trails that link towns and wineries. A number of the wineries have cellar doors and many boast superb winery restaurants that make the most of the abundant fresh local produce. Hawke’s Bay also forms part of the Classic New Zealand Wine Trail that takes you to more than 100 cellar doors across four New Zealand regions.
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Hawke's Bay Trails
Following dedicated cycle paths and the occasional country road, this delightful trail network traces the coast from Bay View in the north to Cape Kidnappers in the south, and ventures inland through idyllic rural and riverside scenery. With mostly flat terrain, fantastic attractions, great food and gorgeous weather, Hawke’s Bay is brilliant for biking at any time of year. These trails are the perfect way to explore the region and offer something for everyone – from world-class wineries and wildlife, to art deco architecture, art galleries and ice cream. Well located bike tour and hire depots and an excellent map with themed rides – Water, Landscapes & Wineries – make it easy to plan the perfect sightseeing tour from an hour to all day, with nearly 200 km of trails to choose from.
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Splash Planet
Splash Planet is New Zealand’s only water theme park and is a beloved Hawke’s Bay destination where generations of families have made lifetime memories.
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Wellington Cable Car
One of Wellington's most popular tourist attractions, the Wellington Cable Car runs from downtown Wellington to the picturesque suburb of Kelburn and Wellington Botanic Garden.
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Moutere Hills
Art galleries, wineries, roadside fruit stalls and gourmet food producers are scattered throughout the pristine landscape.
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Saint Arnaud
Perched on the edge of Lake Rotoiti, St Arnaud is the perfect base from which to explore the honeydew forest and mountains of Nelson Lakes National Park. The village of St Arnaud sits at the edge of Lake Rotoiti in the Nelson region, providing an ideal base for people who plan to hike or fish in Nelson Lakes National Park. Both Lake Rotoroa and Rotoiti are well known for their fine brown trout, and if you walk along the jetty you’ll see some friendly native eels swimming around the waters below. The lakes are a popular destination year round for boating, water skiing, swimming and kayaking, and hosts the annual New Zealand Antique and Classic Boatshow.
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Murchison
Come to Murchison for whitewater thrills – rafting, kayaking, canoeing and jet boating. There are fast running rivers in every direction. Murchison is known as the ‘whitewater capital’ of the country, because there are rivers everywhere – the Gowan, Mangles, Matiri, Glenroy, Matakitaki, Maruia and the mighty Buller. For anybody into canoeing or kayaking, it’s a dream come true with the region offering some of the best all-grades options in New Zealand.
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Nelson Lakes National Park
The Nelson Lakes National Park is an enchanting alpine landscape of rugged peaks, forests and stunning glacial lakes. A compact area of mountain ranges separated by forested valleys, the Nelson Lakes National Park is home to the beginning of the awe-inspiring Southern Alps. Promising everything from easy lakeside walking tracks to challenging alpine hikes, this national park has something on offer for everyone. The beautiful alpine lakes of Rotoroa and Rotoiti form the heart of this 102,000 hectare national park. Both are surrounded by steep mountains and fringed to the shore by native honeydew beech forests, which feed a variety of tuneful nectar-eating native birds.
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Christchurch Gondola
Stunning 360° views from 500 metres above sea level - to the west gaze across the sparkling cityscape of Christchurch, over the Canterbury Plains to the high peaks of the Southern Alps. To the south and east are dramatic views of Banks Peninsula, Lake Ellesmere and Lyttelton Harbour formed in a sunken volcanic crater.
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Lake Hawea
An easy, scenic 15 minute drive from Wanaka and on the road to Makarora and the West Coast, is Lake Hawea. A place of vivid beauty, mountainous extremes and legendary fishing spots. Lake Hawea is an outdoor adventurers’ paradise and a great place to boat, swim, kite surf, kayak, ride, walk or just laze about on the beach. From Lake Hawea township you can find an excellent walk by following Timaru River Road to Timaru Creek, a picnic and camping area. The trail that begins here leads through a valley of beech forest until it flattens onto a braided river bed. With magnificent views of the surrounding peaks, and a lake to cool off, Lake Hawea offers a welcome respite from the long hot months of summer.
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Mount Aspiring National Park
Named for Mt Aspiring, one of New Zealand's highest peaks, this park is a dreamland of mountains, glaciers, river valleys and alpine lakes. A hiker's paradise, Mount Aspiring National Park offers a large number of short walks that are mostly concentrated at the end of the park's access roads. Longer hikes through beautiful valleys, with options to traverse mountain saddles, include the Routeburn, the Dart/Rees River circuit, Greenstone/Caples and the Wilkin Valley tracks. In summer, it’s possible to walk from one valley to another over spectacular mountain passes. Shorter walks include Routeburn Nature Walk, Haast Pass Summit, Lake Sylvan near the lower dart River and the Blue Pools Walk. A highlight of any South Island adventure, the 30-minute Blue Pools Walk leads through silver beech/tahina forest and over a swing bridge to a viewing platform overlooking magnificent crystal-clear pools at the mouth of Blue River.
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The Queenstown Trail
Linking Queenstown, Arrowtown and the Gibbston Valley, this trail network is the ultimate way to reach many of the region’s iconic attractions while soaking up its world-famous scenery. Rides range from easy lakeside jaunts to cross-country treks to winery tours, offering adventures to suit cyclists of almost every ability and area of interest. Visitors are spoilt for choice on this trail network, which dishes up sublime scenery while linking many of the attractions the Queenstown region is famous for. Multiple access and bike hire points, open landscapes and clear signage make for easy navigation, while wide, smooth terrain means riders can keep their eyes front and camera at the ready. Gold rush-era Arrowtown is the starting point for the intermediate Arrow River Bridges Ride that takes in photogenic bridges, country lanes and an old gold miners’ road to historic Kawarau Bridge, site of the world’s original bungy jump operation and a chance to strike the big bounce off the bucket list. Kawarau Bridge signals the start of the Gibbston River Ride, an easy meander through the ‘Valley of the Vines’ and a brilliant way to explore the wineries lining this iconic Central Otago landscape.
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Queenstown Scenic Flights
The magnificent scenery and views around Queenstown, New Zealand can only truly be experienced from the air via a scenic helicopter flight. Glacier Southern Lakes Helicopters operated by Helicopters Queenstown Ltd offer a selection of scenic Queenstown helicopter flights which can fly you over the high points of Lake Wakatipu, The Remarkables, Coronet Peak, Kawarau Gorge, Shotover River, & Skippers Canyon. Experience the thrill of landing on snow and glaciers deep within the alpine ranges and there is plenty of Middle Earth to see for Lord of the Rings & The Hobbit fans also.
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Milford Sound
Situated on the west coast of the South Island, Milford Sound is a fusion of spectacular natural features with amazing visual cues around every corner. Described by Rudyard Kipling as the 'eighth wonder of the world', Milford Sound was carved by glaciers during the ice ages. Breathtaking in any weather, the fiord's cliffs rise vertically from the dark waters, mountain peaks scrape the sky and waterfalls cascade downwards from as high as 1000 metres. When it rains in Milford Sound, and it often does, those waterfalls multiply with magnificent effect.
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Skyline
Take a ride in Queenstown’s iconic Skyline Gondola and immerse yourself in spectacular panoramic views of Queenstown and the surrounding mountains. But there’s more to enjoy! When you get to the top, discover a host of family-friendly activities on offer. Get your fix of downhill fun with the Skyline Luge, settle in for a relaxing evening with the best of New Zealand and international cuisine at Stratosfare Restaurant & Bar, or journey into the hidden world of the Southern night sky with Skyline’s guided Stargazing experience. Located an easy five minute walk from the centre of town, a visit to Skyline Queenstown is a must do!
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Glenorchy
This rustic town is a true outdoor enthusiast's paradise, located just 45 minutes away from Queestown. Set against a background of native beech forest and towering mountain ranges, Glenorchy’s surrounds are nothing short of awe-inspiring. Lake Wakatipu and the Dart River offer opportunities for jet boating and kayaking, and some of New Zealand’s best hiking trails can be accessed from here. Horse trekking in the area is also highly recommended. Glenorchy’s spectacular landscapes have become a prime location for film scouts, depicting many scenes from The Lord of the Rings trilogy as well as featuring in the Narnia movies. Twenty kilometres away from Glenorchy, as bucolic farmland gives way to beech forests, lies Paradise. Some say it was christened for its natural charms, others for the paradise ducks that live in the area. Nobody can say for sure how it got its name, but the one thing people agree on is its breathtaking beauty.
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Aramoana Beach
This beautiful white sandy beach is split by the Mole, a long breakwater stretching out into the harbour entrance. It's an exciting walk when the seas are big and a great spot to watch the albatrosses swooping into Taiaroa Head on the other side the harbour.
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North Brother Mountain
Situated in the Dooragan National Park, North Brother Mountain offers some of the most accessible, panoramic views on the east coast of Australia. The immediate view is over the magnificent Camden Haven Inlet with the Camden Haven River winding between Queens and Watson Taylors Lakes. Views extend to Crowdy Head in the south and as far as Mount Yarrahappini in the north. You will find excellent trails and walks suiting all fitness levels. If you are looking for more than a view, then try the challenging Laurieton Track - if you dare! You will go through spectacular blackbutt forests which mingle with enormous old stumps, reflecting the old days of timber harvesting in the park. The mountain is a 'mecca' for paragliders and hang gliders. If you are looking for than a view, then try the challenging Laurieton Track - if you dare!
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Lake Innes Nature Reserve
At Lake Innes Nature Reserve, near Port Macquarie, visitors can enjoy cycling, fishing, birdwatching, swimming, kayaking and learning about NSW convict settlement history. Whether you’re an eager history student or an outdoor adventurer, you’ll find plenty to do at Lake Innes Nature Reserve, not far from Port Macquarie. The reserve features a fascinating historic site set in gorgeous natural scenery with plenty of opportunities for hiking, cycling, birdwatching and water sport activities. Lake Innes lies at its heart and is a picturesque setting for the historically significant Innes Ruins, which is a great place to learn all about early settlement and convict history in NSW. You can book a tour of the ruins through the Port Macquarie Information Centre. The lake is also a gorgeous backdrop for picnicking, birdwatching, walking or cycling. Or, get out on the water by kayaking or canoeing across it or enjoying a splash of swimming in its tranquil waters or spot of fishing from Perch Hole. There’s an impressive array of wildlife to admire here too, including osprey, ducks and swans paddling on the lake and the kangaroos, wallabies and dingoes that can be seen throughout the reserve.
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Mud Pool
Hot spring water combines with volcanic ash to form a mud bath pool. Mud baths have existed for thousands of years and found in spas around the world including Fiji. The mud bath treatment is used as a way to relieve arthritis. To take full advantage of the therapeutic value of the mud pools you first coat yourself in mud then stand in the sun until it drys. Wash off in the first natural hot spring pool then walk over to the next clear water pool for another cleansing. Both places offer cheap and very good massage. Pool temperatures are warm to hot.
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Bondi to Bronte coastal walk
Its combination of beaches, parks and spectacular views make this walk unique. It started out as a state project during the 1930s, it now extends from Ben Buckler Point to the southern end of Waverley Cemetery (and on to Coogee; for information call Randwick Council). It includes Bondi, Tamarama and Bronte beaches and a medium gradient cliff-top path from Bondi to Tamarama, with occasional seating and several staircases. The beachside parks offer picnic shelters, coin-operated barbecues, play areas, kiosks, toilets and change-rooms. The total length of the walk (Ben Buckler to Waverley Cemetery) is approximately 4 km; allow 1.5 hours walking time. Ben Buckler to Bondi Beach: about 0.5 km; allow 10 minutes.Bondi Promenade: 1 km; allow 15 minutes.South Bondi to North Bronte: about 1.5 km; allow 45 minutes.South Bronte to Waverley Cemetery: about 1 km; allow 20 minutes.