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National Trust Runnymede

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Seen by many as the birthplace of modern democracy, this picturesque open landscape beside the Thames was witness to King John's historic sealing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215. Today Runnymede is the perfect place to relax outdoors or to pause and reflect on the history of the struggle for freedom. As well as a monument to the democratic legacy of the Magna Carta, you'll find further memorials to John F. Kennedy and the Commonwealth Air Forces. There are two art installations to be discovered in the meadows. The Jurors by Hew Locke is a collection of 12 bronze chairs sat in the meadow, each intricately decorated with designs depicting current and past struggles relating to democracy and freedom. Writ in Water is a major architectural artwork by Mark Wallinger, in collaboration with Studio Octopi. The large scale circular building features a labyrinth style entrance leading to a central chamber, where a pool sits below a central opening, reflecting in light from the outside. Celebrating the enduring significance of Magna Carta, this unique piece of artwork offers space for reflection and contemplation.

https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/national-trust-runnymede-p401181

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St George's Chapel
Take in the splendour of St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, the setting for the marriages of Prince Harry and Ms Meghan Markle and HRH Princess Eugenie and Mr Jack Brooksbank in 2018, the burial place of 10 monarchs including Henry VIII and Charles I and one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture in England. St George’s Chapel is regarded as one of the most beautiful ecclesiastical buildings in England and is characterised by large windows and tall, slender pillars giving the impression of grace and elegance. The chapel features remarkable examples of medieval woodwork and ironwork. The magnificent Sovereign’s Stall, used by The Queen today, dates from the late eighteenth century. https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/st-georges-chapel-p45153
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Windsor Castle
No trip to Windsor could possibly be complete without a visit to amazing Windsor Castle, the family home to British kings and queens for over 1,000 years. The size of the Castle (5.3 hectares/13 acres) is breathtaking, in fact, it is the largest and oldest occupied castle in the world and it’s where Her Majesty The Queen chooses to spend most of her private weekends. You might even time your visit when she is in residence! Look at the flag flying from the Castle’s Round Tower; if it’s the Royal Standard The Queen will be there too. Over the past few years, the Royal Collection Trust has been busy transforming the experience of visiting Windsor Castle, and visitors are already enjoying many improvements to the visitor experience. The Moat Room, a new introductory space, now tells the story of the Castle’s 1,000 years of history. Windsor Castle’s Inner Hall, created by George IV in the 1820s as a space to receive official guests, has been restored and opened to the public. Now, for the first time since its closure by George’s niece, Queen Victoria, the Inner Hall serves its original purpose as a magnificent welcome area for visitors to the Castle. The medieval Undercroft has now been transformed into the Castle's first permanent café. https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/windsor-castle-p43983
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Frogmore House
Set amidst the extensive Home Park of Windsor Castle, Frogmore House is surrounded by fine and picturesque gardens. The house dates from the 1680s and was purchased for Queen Charlotte in 1792. Here the Queen was able to indulge her love of botany and laid out the garden with many rare and unusual plants. At one time the house was the home of Queen Victoria's mother, the Duchess of Kent. After her death, her son-in-law, Prince Albert, commissioned the building of an elegant mausoleum to hold her remains. Queen Victoria was particularly fond of Frogmore's peaceful ambience and it became her favourite retreat. Victoria and Albert's love of Frogmore lead them to break with tradition and build themselves a much larger and grander mausoleum for themselves. Favoured also by King George V and Queen Mary, they used Frogmore for entertaining during Ascot Week. Today, with its handsome house and tranquil gardens, it is easy to imagine the love Frogmore inspired in its former residents. https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/frogmore-house-p50923
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The Savill Garden
The Savill Garden is one of Britain’s greatest ornamental gardens. It never fails to charm visitors who come to explore its 35 acres of contemporary and classically designed gardens and exotic woodland. Developed under the patronage of Kings and Queens, The Savill Garden was created in the 1930s by Sir Eric Savill. The Savill Garden is a place of constant discovery, and of interlocking gardens, containing distinctive areas such as Spring Wood, The Summer Wood, The Hidden Gardens, The Summer Gardens, The Glades, Autumn Wood, The Azalea Walks and The New Zealand Garden. The Savill Garden mixes native and exotic species and has bred many important garden hybrids. Each ‘garden within a garden’ has its own attractions, and the gardens are ever-changing with every season bringing new colour and interest to delight the visitor. The Rose Garden takes a fresh and contemporary approach to display roses. The design creates an intense sensory experience with roses especially chosen for their scent, strong colours and repeats flowering. Visitors enjoy the perfume at its best, together with stunning views, from a walkway which appears to ‘float’ above the Rose Garden. https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/the-savill-garden-p276241
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Windsor Great Park
Windsor Great Park covers 4,800 acres, parts of which are open to the public. Its present area was determined in the 1360s and was popular with Saxon kings as a hunting forest. The park is shrouded in mystery and legend and for over 1,000 years the story of Herne the Hunter has been told. His ghost still appears wearing the antlers of a stag, riding a phantom black stallion at the head of a pack of black hounds. He appears to warn of times of trouble and gallops through Windsor Great Park only to disappear into thin air. The park today is the perfect place for picnics, eating, shopping, running, walking, cycling, horse riding and fishing. Families will love the children's play area near The Savill Garden. https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/windsor-great-park-p236491
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Stanley Spencer Gallery
The Stanley Spencer Gallery is situated in the heart of Cookham, the picturesque ‘village in heaven’ where Spencer was born and painted for most of his life. Established in 1962 the building was transformed ten years ago into a magnificent modern art museum, home to the world’s largest collection of Spencer paintings, drawings, personal letters, photographs, press cuttings and books. Visitor attractions: film and audio guide; exhibition catalogue; self-guided walk pamphlet; free children’s activity booklet; gift shop. https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/stanley-spencer-gallery-p48013
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Dorney Court
Dorney Court is one of England’s finest stately homes. It is a Grade 1 listed building, renowned for its architectural importance and historical significance, and any visit is a fascinating and unique experience. Built in the 15th century, the Tudor Manor House has been lived in by the Palmer family for more than 450 years – this remarkable and characterful building has been passed from father to son over thirteen generations. “Dorney” is the ancient Saxon word for “island of bees” and the estate remains famous for its honey which is still produced to this day. The very first pineapple to be raised in England was grown at Dorney Court and presented to Charles II in 1661 and the spectre of a bald lady haunts the wood-panelled hallways. Dorney Court is very much a family home and visitors will find that the House and Grounds have an easy charm and a warmth of welcome that reflect continuing family use and the passion and love of everyone involved with the Estate. Dorney Court has been used as a film and TV location since the 1970s. The House and Grounds have featured in a wide range of productions including Elizabeth: The Golden Age, The Other Boleyn Girl, Inspector Morse and Poirot. When you visit Dorney Court, you will find rooms full of history. Oak and beautiful lacquer furniture compete for space with family portraits and treasures collected over six centuries. https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/dorney-court-p51843
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Bray Lake Watersports
Take part in a variety of water sports at Bray Lake! Enjoy Stand Up Paddle Boarding, Windsurfing, Kayaking, Dinghy Sailing and Open Water Swimming. The Centre is open 7 days a week and offers equipment hire, holiday courses and private tuition. https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/bray-lake-watersports-p281701
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Braywick Nature Centre
Based at Braywick Nature Centre, the Royal Borough's Countryside Service promotes awareness of the natural environment through our programme of events, walks and talks, and providing education sessions and advice to schools and other groups. https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/braywick-nature-centre-p281691
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Maidenhead Heritage Centre
Learn all about the history of Maidenhead AND fly in a Spitfire simulator at this little gem of a museum! https://www.windsor.gov.uk/things-to-do/maidenhead-heritage-centre-p314711