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Beaches in Australia

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Bondi Beach
The day begins early at Bondi Beach. As a glorious sunrise edges above the ocean horizon, surfers gracefully carve up waves, joggers limber up on the promenade and swimmers flip turn in Bondi Baths. The famous beach is buzzing from dawn to dusk and then Bondi’s night-time scene sparkles.The beautiful sandy beach is perfect for travel snaps or selfies at any time of the year. Just 8km from the city centre, Bondi is easy to get to by public transport – the trip from Town Hall is 30 minutes. Or you can take a scenic ferry ride from Circular Quay to Watsons Bay for a connecting bus to Bondi. https://www.sydney.com/destinations/sydney/sydney-east/bondi/beach-lifestyle
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Bronte Beach
Bronte is just over a kilometer’s walk south of Bondi. The beach itself faces east and picks up swell from any direction, but bulky headlands to the north and south and clusters of underwater rocks make conditions challenging, especially for swimmers. The south headland shapes Bronte’s premium wave, but it breaks across rocks so it’s for confident board-riders only.Those same rocks create a sheltered natural pool beloved of parents with young kids, while an ocean-fed lap pool tucked in beneath the south headland provides one of Sydney’s finest saltwater swim experiences (free entry). A wide grassy park behind the beach has barbecues and picnic tables and gives way to a wooded gully between rows of expensive houses on the opposing hillsides. https://www.sydney.com/destinations/sydney/sydney-east/bondi/attractions/bronte-beach
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Manly Beach
You're spoilt for choice when it comes to Manly Beach. Whether you want to spread a towel out and enjoy the soft white sand all day, surf its waves or explore its depths while snorkelling or diving, there's something for everyone. For those that prefer to look at it, it also makes a great backdrop for picnics or walking and cycle tracks. Manly is where the world's first surfing contest was held in 1964, making it one of Australia's most famous beaches. The iconic beach curves from South Steyne to North Steyne and Queenscliff, where a submerged reef, or bombora, creates the waves that inspire the world's best surfers to travel to our shores. https://www.sydney.com/destinations/sydney/sydney-north/manly/beach-lifestyle
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Palm Beach
There's a reason that Palm Beach doubles up as the setting for Summer Bay, the fictional beach in TV show Home & Away, the golden sand and sparkling blue sea make it look too good to be true. But there's more than just sea and sand here, explore Barrenjoey Head, Sydney’s northernmost seaside point and lots more. What makes Palm Beach, a narrow peninsular, so spectacular is its unbeatable location. It won nature's lottery and is surrounded by water on three sides: Pittwater to the west, the Pacific Ocean to the east, and Broken Bay to the north at the mouth of the Hawkesbury River, which meanders inland to historic Windsor. If you're planning on spending the day at Palmy, as the locals call it, bring your board because you'll enjoy excellent surf at the northern end of the beach. The southern end is more lo-fi, offering less active beachgoers a protected area for swimming in the ocean pool and pretty picnic spots under the pine trees. https://www.sydney.com/destinations/sydney/sydney-north/palm-beach
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Bondi to Coogee Coastal Walk
Offering visitors to Sydney an opportunity to join in and do what the locals do - the Bondi to Coogee Walk is a popular coastal walk offering beautiful coastline vistas, cosy beaches and cafe strips for refuelling. It is six kilometres long and takes about two hours to complete at a good pace, but why not break it up with a freshly squeezed juice or a relaxed coffee, then finish with a swim at Coogee Beach. The walk passes one of the world's more scenic operational cemeteries, the Waverley Cemetery where graves of famous Australians such as Henry Lawson can be found. https://www.sydney.com/destinations/sydney/sydney-east/bondi/attractions/bondi-coogee-coastal-walk
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Collaroy Beach
Collaroy has great swimming conditions and is excellent for beginner surfers. While advanced surfers are more likely to look at nearby wave-magnets such as Narrabeen and Long Reef, Collaroy does offer a considerable advantage in amenities for visitors. Collaroy Beach has a fully accessible beach reserve and playground complete with disabled toilets, accessible picnic areas, rockpool and paths. For those in a wheelchair, it has a freewheeler wheelchair that can go in the water, and a liberty swing. https://www.sydney.com/destinations/sydney/sydney-north/northern-beaches/attractions/collaroy-beach
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Freshwater Beach
Freshwater is part of the Manly-Freshwater National and World Surfing Reserve that recognises the historical, cultural and environmental values of famous surfing beaches. It is where Duke Kahanamoku held his famous 1915 surfing demonstration that popularised surfing in Australia. Freshwater has some pretty reasonable waves in the one to two-metre mark. It can be busy on a summers day with people learning to surf, and families sticking in groups. For less experienced surfers, the break at the middle-northern end of the beach is an ideal spot for you. More experienced surfers may not get the wave they’re looking for but you can try the southern end which can get pumping with the right swell. https://www.northernbeaches.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/recreation-area/freshwater-beach
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Long Reef Beach
Long Reef is a perfect stretch of white sand. At the north end there is Long Reef Headland, a protected aquatic reserve, and a golf course. A walk to the top of the headland can often be rewarded by views of migrating whales. There are offshore reefs in the north (the Long Reef Bomboras) and beach breaks running the entire 1.6 kilometres south to Dee Why and, on weekdays there's every chance of getting a quality wave to yourself. The Long Reef Bomboras starts to break at one metre or so and in a big south swell can produce a beautiful wave up to five metres. Reliable sandbanks shape beach breaks that are great for beginners and intermediate surfers. North Long Reef is also a favourite for windsurfing and kitesurfing. https://www.sydney.com/destinations/sydney/sydney-north/northern-beaches/attractions/long-reef-beach
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Ocean Beach Umina
Located between Umina Beach and Ettalong Beach at the southern end of the Central Coast and nestled within the protection of Broken Bay you will find over two kilometres of golden sand to relax on and enjoy. Ocean Beach provides the beauty of an ocean beach with the safety of an inland waterway, offering a perfect location for families. Picnic tables with seating are available, along with barbecue's and a children's playground. The beach is patrolled every day from October long weekend until the end of the April school holiday break. Public facilities are available as well as lovely grassed and under cover picnic areas. https://www.visitnsw.com/destinations/central-coast/gosford-area/ettalong-beach/attractions/ocean-beach-umina
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Port Phillip
Port Phillip is the entrance to Australia's busiest port and is one of Victoria's most popular recreational destinations. Every year millions of people enjoy its vast coastline, world-class swimming beaches and coastal parks. An entirely different perspective however is available to those who explore Port Phillip by boat. Island, shipwrecks and marine reserves dot Port Phillip, while scuba diving and fishing reveal the colourful diversity of Port Phillip's marine life. http://www.visitmelbourne.com/regions/Melbourne/Things-to-do/Nature-and-wildlife/National-parks-and-reserves/Port-Phillip.aspx
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Bells Beach
Ride a wave at Bells Beach, located near Torquay on the southern coast of Victoria in the Great Ocean Road region. Head to Bells Beach over the Easter weekend and watch the world's best surfers carve up the waves at the Rip Curl Pro Surfing Competition. High cliffs provide a dramatic backdrop to the natural amphitheatre of the beach and large swells from the Southern Ocean, which slow down and steepen over the reef-strewn shallows, creates the outstanding surf. If you're a sightseer, Bells Beach is a popular spot with great vantage points along the cliff. For surfers, Bells Beach is really for the experienced. The beach is an exposed reef and point break with excellent right-hand breaks, at their best during autumn and winter. https://www.visitmelbourne.com/regions/Great-Ocean-Road/Things-to-do/Nature-and-wildlife/Beaches-and-coastlines/VV-Bells-Beach
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Thirteenth Beach
Grab your surfboard and explore this 4.5 kilometre stretch of picturesque coastline west of Barwon Heads. A popular surf spot, Thirteenth Beach provides varied conditions to suit both learner and advanced surfers. The lovely wide stretch of sand spreads between looming sand dunes and crashing waves, and is also ideal for a refreshing walk, jog, sandcastle-making or ballplay with the dog. Take a short walk around the headland, don a wetsuit for some diving, and take in the expansive views. https://www.visitvictoria.com/regions/Geelong-and-the-Bellarine/Things-to-do/Nature-and-wildlife/Beaches-and-coastlines/VV-Thirteenth-Beach.aspx
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Main Beach
While other suburbs snatch their names from exotic Aboriginal meanings or English seaside villages, Main Beach is far more literal. Situated at the northern end of the Gold Coast, Main Beach was so named as it was the main surf beach to the town of Southport. But while its name may be obvious, its hidden gems are far more exciting for this is one of the coast’s areas which celebrates something old and something new in style. A highlight of a visit here is to the beach itself, where the old bathing pavilion, Pavilion 34 to be precise, has been reincarnated as a casual beach café complete with chiko rolls, potato scallops, pineapple fritters and fish and chips. The old male and female change pavilions are still here and there’s loads of retro photos to remind you of the Main Beach of old. This bathing pavilion sits next to the Southport Surf Club, the first to make its mark on the Gold Coast in 1936 and right next to a sprawling shady park which is perfect for oceanfront picnics. Away from the beach - popular with surfers due to its open shore break - toddle down to Tedder Avenue. Sassy socialites and salty surfies rub shoulders here in this strip of modern cafes, exclusive restaurants, bars and boutiques. For more shopping and style, take a wander towards the Southport Spit – or simply The Spit - to locals. https://www.destinationgoldcoast.com/places-to-see/main-beach
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Snapper Rocks
Snapper Rocks is a small rocky outcrop on the northern side of Point Danger at the southern end of Rainbow Bay on the Gold Coast. Snapper is a point break forming the first part of the man-made Superbank which extends from Snapper Rocks Point, through Rainbow Bay, Greenmount Point, Coolangatta Beach, and Kirra, for a distance of around two kilometres. The Superbank is now renowned as one of the most consistent breaks in Queensland and plays host to the annual World Surf Leagues’ Quiksilver and Roxy Pros. Multiple barrel sections can now occur at any point along this length. The quality of the surf has markedly improved since the 1990s, and is now of legendary quality, creating one of the longest, hollowest and best waves in the world. The Rainbow Bay Surf Club is the best place to view the break while enjoying a relaxed meal. https://www.queensland.com/en-au/attraction/snapper-rocks
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Fitzroy Island
Fitzroy Island is one of the most unspoilt islands adjacent to the Great Barrier Reef. Fitzroy Island National Park is a mountainous rainforest oasis surrounded by fringing reef formations. Enjoy the resort facilities and rainforest walks to white coral beaches and spectacular lookouts. Fitzroy Island also offers a wide range of water sport activities as well as snorkelling, introductory and certified diving and a learn-to-dive school. The island is 339 hectares in size, 324 of which is protected as Fitzroy Island National Park. The island is on the continental shelf and is within sight of the mainland; in fact, it’s a peak in a mountain chain which lies south of Cairns. The reef surrounding Fitzroy Island is a “Fringing Reef”. Fitzroy Island is located on the Inner Barrier of the Central Region of the Great Barrier Reef. It is part of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. http://www.greatbarrierreef.org/islands/fitzroy-island/
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Fraser Island
Say hello to Fraser Island - also known as the largest sand island in the world. You can gaze up at towering ancient trees in astonishing rainforests growing out of sand on this World Heritage-listed wonder, be amazed by the incredible sapphire blues and emeraldene greens in the stunning freshwater lakes and float down Eli Creek https://www.visitfrasercoast.com/Destinations/Fraser-Island
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Cylinder Beach
Cylinder Beach is a picturesque cove between Cylinder and Home Beach Headlands. It is popular with families because it is easily accessible with a carpark situated only metres from the beach. The waves at Cylinder are often smaller and therefore it is perfect for sunbathing and swimming during good weather conditions. However, during strong southerly winds, there is a side sweep which may carry you parallel to the beach. Cylinder Beach is also a favourite with surfers when the conditions are right. Lifeguards and lifesavers patrol this beach. https://www.visitbrisbane.com.au/redlands/things-to-do/nature-and-wildlife/natural-attractions/cylinder-beach--north-stradbroke-island?sc_lang=en-au
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Frenchmans Beach
In the late 19th Century, four men sailed west from the French-speaking South Pacific islands. They landed on this beach, which was named after them. The four men, Jack Newfong, John Lifu, George Fenoch and Richard Martin, were taken to the Myora/Moongalba Mission, where they ended up settling. Descendants of these four men still live on North Stradbroke Island. Frenchman’s Beach faces due east, receiving little protection from the prevailing south-east waves. The beach is 500m long and is backed by steep, densely vegetated bluffs, access to the beach is either around Dune Rocks from Deadmans Beach, or down a signed steep walking track from the main road. The beach receives waves averaging between 1 and 1.5m, which maintain an inner bar usually cut by two rips, including a permanent rip against Dune Rocks. https://stradbrokeisland.com/tour-item/frenchmans-beach/
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Mindil Beach Sunset Market
Amid the breezy dry season air on Thursday and Sunday evenings, Mindil Beach Sunset Market hosts street performers, musicians, craft stalls and a large collection of international food stalls on the stretch of parkland behind Mindil Beach. Arrive early (about 6pm) to beat the crowds. Immerse your tastebuds in Darwin's Asian food culture with a Malaysian laksa, a savoury Japanese pancake or a Thai green papaya salad. For dessert, visit Petra's Raw Cakes and munch on a raw brownie ball, or a slice of lime and macadamia cheesecake. https://www.mindil.com.au/
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Wave Lagoon
Catch a wave at Darwin's coolest Waterfront attraction: the Wave Pool. Here, a palm-fringed swimming pool turns into a tube-riding, boogie-boarding bucket of fun when the siren signals the start of the swell. It is giggles galore in twenty minutes bursts as the waves send inflatable tubes bobbing about and boogie boards riding the crests. The swell here is gentle enough that there's little danger of wiping out (and there are no surfboards allowed) but there are red-and-yellow-clad surf lifeguards at the sidelines to keep everyone safe. In a lull, relax on banana lounges under enormous beach umbrellas, or spread out on the lawn in the shade. There are wading pools and fountains to keep wannabe grommets entertained, and a kiosk to keep the whole family in the supply of ice-creams and drinks. https://northernterritory.com/darwin-and-surrounds/see-and-do/darwin-wave-lagoon
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Catseye Beach
One of the main beaches on Hamilton Island, beautiful Catseye Beach is a perfect spot for relaxing, swimming, and enjoying a whole range of fun watersports. Hamilton Island Beach Sports is located right on the beach, and has catamarans, paddleboards, windsurfers, kayaks and snorkelling equipment available for hire. The long and curved Catseye Beach is a beautiful place to while away the hours - soaking up some sun, enjoying a good book, or swimming in the turquoise water. At low tide, take a leisurely stroll out on the sand flats and see the island from a different perspective. http://www.hamiltonisland.com.au/beach-sports/catseye-beach
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Leighton Beach
Leighton Beach is a popular beach just north of Fremantle offering lovely snorkelling, swimming or just an easily accessible spot for enjoying a trip to the beach. With low wave conditions it is suitable for young children. Laze on the soft white sandy beach and observe the skilled wind and kite surfers tackling the winds off the shore. Cool off in the refreshing waters of the Indian Ocean and try your hand at body surfing. On a calm day ensure you have a snorkel to observe the marine life under the water. For the more active, take advantage of the flat water to join some of the locals who swim daily along the coast. Complete a perfect day at the beach with the stunning Western Australian sunset against the backdrop of Rottnest Island. https://www.westernaustralia.com/en/Attraction/Leighton_Beach/56b2678faeeeaaf773cfa541#/
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Scarborough Beach
Just 20 minutes from Perth City, Scarborough Beach offers one of Perth's most popular beaches. Located within the City of Stirling, with excellent public transport links, there is no excuse not to visit. Once you're done surfing, sunbathing and swimming spend a relaxing hour or two at one of the many cafés or bars overlooking the ocean. Or you can stay overnight, at one of the many accommodation options. Scarborough Beach is currently going through a massive face-lift with a $30 million revitalisation of the area to create a vibrant hub of activity. During summer enjoy live entertainment at the only amphitheatre on the beach in WA. https://www.experienceperth.com/destination/scarborough-beach
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Trigg Beach
Trigg Beach is one of Perth's most popular surfing beaches, with a consistent break for boarders. The long soft, white sandy beach and grassed reserve to the north is very popular amongst locals and provides lots of space for visitors. Trigg Island is also a hotspot for birdwatching and fishing, with dolphins occasionally spotted here in summer. https://www.mybeach.com.au/beach/trigg-island/
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Cactus Beach
On the western side of the Point are the world-famous Cactus and Castles beaches, and their surrounding surfing breaks. The Penong Road runs along the back of Cactus Beach, with a large camping area set amongst the dune scrub, between the road and beach, and good vehicle and foot access to the back of the beach. There is a small camp store, which provides the only commercial activity in the area. The beaches are 250 and 400 m long respectively. They face west and are backed by a low foredune, bordered by calcarenite bluffs and fronted by exposed beach rock and shallow calcarenite reefs. In the lee of the reefs is a narrow high tide sand beach, and while waves can be large on the outer reefs, they are usually less than 0.5 m when they finally reach the beach. However, both beaches are drained by strong permanent rips, particularly off Castles. In addition to the Cactus left and Castles right surf breaks off the beaches, to the south of Cactus out on Point Sinclair is Witzigs, Backdoors and Cunns, while off the north Castles bluff is Caves, Crushers and Supertubes. All the breaks are over calcarenite reefs and receive slight protection and cleaner waves owing to refraction around the point and over outer deeper reefs. https://beachsafe.org.au/beach/sa/unincorporated-sa/penong/cactus
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Waitpinga Beach
Waitpinga, an Aboriginal name meaning home of the wind, is about 10 km southwest of Victor Harbor. It is well known for its fishing, mostly salmon and mullet, and also popular for its surfing. Waitpinga is an exposed beach that has the best consistent surfing this close to Adelaide. Recommended only for experienced swimmers and surfers with what may be considered dangerous conditions. There are rough waves, with powerful rips. https://fleurieupeninsula.com.au/waitpinga-beach
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Glenelg Beach
Glenelg is Adelaide’s most popular beach. It is famous for its sandy wide beach, long grassed and shaded picnic areas right on the seaside, rich heritage, charming hotels and bustling shops, sidewalk cafes and plenty of entertainment at venues or on the strip with many talented buskers. Jetty Road is one kilometre of shopping that leads right into the jetty and the beach itself. You can take yourself off for some retail therapy with plenty of fashion and gift boutiques, shoe stores, swimwear and surf shops, art galleries and jewellery stores. Whether it is winter or summer, you can enjoy the myriad of activities available at Glenelg beach for all ages. The Glenelg foreshore has a natural playspace for kids to balance and swing. Moseley Square has water fountains to cool off on hot days. https://southaustralia.com/products/adelaide/attraction/glenelg-beach
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Clifton Beach
Clifton Beach is an Urban Location area within the local government area of Clarence in Tasmania, it is located approximately 20kms from the capital Hobart and extends over an area of 7.356 square kilometres. Clifton Beach has a recorded population of 588 residents and is within the Australian Eastern Daylight Time zone Australia/Hobart. If you are planning a visit to Clifton Beach we’ve put together some of the things you can see or do while you are here. These include places to stay, tours and attractions, some upcoming events and places where you can grab a meal. Go ahead, try one of the buttons above. Every destination has something worth seeing so start exploring… https://www.australias.guide/tas/location/clifton-beach/
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Connie Bay on Keswick Island
At the far north end of Keswick Island, Connie Bay is a secluded beach of sweeping white sand, turquoise water and fringing coral. The beach is quite secluded, which has made it a favourable area for nesting turtles. And nearby the majestic melaleuca wood is a point of interest for many visitors, especially when the swarms of vibrant blue butterflies are in residence. https://www.queensland.com/en-au/attraction/connie-bay-on-keswick-island
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Flynns Beach
Flynns Beach, situated three kilometres south of Port Macquarie, is almost 500 metres long and nestled between a pair of rocky headlands to the north and south. It has good protection from westerly and southerly winds and suits learn-to-surfers most of the year. The Surf Club has a kiosk that serves meals. There is plenty of accommodation available within a short walk of Flynns Beach. https://portmacquarieinfo.com.au/see-do/flynns-beach
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Grants Beach
Grants (North Haven) Beach is located on the north side of the Camden Haven River mouth. The southern end is protected by the break wall which offers great 'right-handers' with a southerly swell. The beach is home to the Camden Haven Surf Lifesaving Club, who patrol the beach throughout the summer weekends. Dogs are allowed north of the patrolled area. The beach runs north-south for about 3.5 kilometres and is paralleled by a lovely walking track through the littoral forest and heathland. The beach is patrolled by council lifeguards and the Camden Haven Surf Club during school holidays. There are showers, toilets, and picnic tables at the southern end. https://www.visitnsw.com/destinations/north-coast/port-macquarie-area/north-haven/attractions/grants-beach
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Harrington Beach
Harrington Beach stretches from Harrington village to the picturesque fishing village of Crowdy Head, and is part of the Harrington Beach State Park. This quiet beach location between the two villages is ideal for relaxing strolls and fishing opportunities. Harrington break wall is a very popular spot for fishing, walking, and taking in the views of the ocean. There is a fish cleaning facility conveniently located at the beginning of the break wall. The Harrington Lagoon is located off the beach area; it is a safe swimming spot for families and is very popular during the warmer months. Car parking is available at the lagoon area off Crowdy Road. https://www.visitnsw.com/destinations/north-coast/forster-and-taree-area/taree/attractions/harrington-beach
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Harrington Beach State Park
Harrington Beach State Park is situated on the New South Wales Mid North Coast and comprises lands surrounding and including the Manning River's northern entrance. The 431 hectare site stretches from Harrington to the picturesque fishing village of Crowdy Head. The foreshores of the coastal beaches and estuary provide an array of year round recreation and tourism opportunities. The State Park also includes a small littoral rainforest that is accessible to the public. https://www.visitnsw.com/destinations/north-coast/forster-and-taree-area/taree/attractions/harrington-beach-state-park
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