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Architecture in United Kingdom

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Big Ben
The Houses of Parliament's iconic clock tower is one of London's most famous landmarks! The Houses of Parliament and Elizabeth Tower, commonly called Big Ben, are among London's most iconic landmarks and must-see London attractions. Technically, Big Ben is the name given to the massive bell inside the clock tower, which weighs more than 13 tons (13,760 kg). The clock tower looks spectacular at night when the four clock faces are illuminated. Elizabeth Tower stands at more than 96 metres tall, with 334 steps to climb up to the belfry and 399 steps to the Ayrton Light at the very top of the tower. It is not possible for overseas visitors to tour the clock tower. Instead, join a talk on the Elizabeth Tower or take a tour of the Houses of Parliament next to The Elizabeth Tower. Alternatively, watch this behind-the-scenes video of Big Ben in action. https://www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/sightseeing/london-attraction/big-ben
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Buckingham Palace
Visit a Buckingham Palace for a glimpse inside one of the few working royal palaces remaining in the world today. During the summer, you can tour the 19 spectacular State Rooms. These magnificent rooms are decorated with some of the greatest treasures from the Royal Collection, including paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens and Van Dyck. Outside of the summer opening, you can still see the iconic exterior of the palace and watch the famous Changing the Guard. https://www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/place/427311-buckingham-palace
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Kensington Palace
Kensington Palace, a palace of secret stories and public lives, has been influenced by generations of royal women. Experience life as an 18th-century royal courtier whilst making your way through the magnificent King's and Queen's State Apartments adorned with remarkable paintings from the Royal Collection. Victoria Revealed, set within the rooms Queen Victoria lived in as a child, is an exhibition that explores her life and reign as wife, mother, Queen and Empress. Diana: Her Fashion Story - Kensington Palace’s newest exhibition - traces the evolution of Diana’s style; from the demure, romantic outfits of her first public appearances to the glamour, elegance and confidence of her later life. Highlights include the pink blouse worn for Diana’s engagement portrait in 1981 and the ink blue velvet gown, worn when the princess danced with John Travolta. https://www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/place/428001-kensington-palace
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Tower of London
Despite the Tower of London's grim reputation as a place of torture and death, within these walls you will also discover the history of a royal palace, an armoury and a powerful fortress. Don't miss Royal Beasts and learn about the wild and wonderous animals that have inhabited the Tower, making it the first London Zoo. Discover the priceless Crown Jewels, join an iconic Beefeater on a tour and hear their bloody tales, stand where famous heads have rolled, learn the legend of the Tower's ravens, storm the battlements, get to grips with swords and armour, and much more! http://www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/place/22249-hm-tower-of-london
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Bramber Castle
Although now far inland, Bramber Castle was originally situated on the coast where the River Adur meets the sea. Built by the de Braose family it was confiscated by King John whose harsh treatment of Lady de Braose and her two sons led to the rebellion that culminated in Magna Carta. http://www.castlesfortsbattles.co.uk/south_east/bramber_castle.html
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Bullring & Grand Central
Bullring & Grand Central is the glamorous heart of Birmingham and home to one of the country’s most popular shopping destinations. Discover over 240 of the most imaginative and desirable shops, catering for all your fashion and lifestyle needs – including Selfridges, John Lewis and Debenhams department stores – all right here, in the centre of town. https://www.bullring.co.uk/
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Aston Hall
At Aston Hall follow in the footsteps of royalty and visit one of the last great Jacobean houses to be built. Built between 1618 and 1635 for Sir Thomas Holte and home to James Watt Junior from 1817-1848, Aston Hall is steeped in history. Now a grade I listed building, the hall is restored to its former Jacobean splendor and is hugely popular with visitors of all ages. Walk through the stunning interiors and see the home that received royalty, was besieged during the English Civil War and inspired an author. https://visitbirmingham.com/things-to-see-and-do/aston-hall-p209911
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Black Country Living Museum
Award-winning corner of the West Midlands is now one of the finest and largest open-air museums in the United Kingdom. After very humble beginnings, a bright idea and 40 years of inspiration, this is twenty six acres worth exploring. Amazing as it may seem, we have created a ‘place’ – a real and lively place, where once there was nothing and nobody. With a village and charismatic residents to chat with. Hear the stories of the people who lived and worked in the Black Country from our friendly Historic Characters. They'll explain what it was really like to be alive at the height of the Industrial Revolution. Visit a fairground - fancy a bit of old-fashioned fun? Why not visit our fairground with original rides dating back to 1910? Have a go on the Brooklyn Cakewalk, test your skills on the 'hook a duck' or hit the right spot with a throw on the the coconut shy. Have a ride on a vintage bus. Museum maintains a selection of vintage vehicles for you to ride throughout the year. Why not hop on the longest trolleybus route in the country? Play some old school street games. Head on down to the cobbled street and try your hand at some classic street games including the 'hoop and stick' and the 'cup and ball' . And also Explore over 40 period shops, houses and industrial areas. Since 1978 we've been recreating buildings from around the Black Country, sometimes moving them here brick-by-brick. Grab and a map and get exploring! https://www.bclm.co.uk/
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Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens
These 10 acre walled gardens (listed Grade II) are a rare example of formal English garden design. They are being restored as near as possible to the period 1680 to 1762 when the Bridgeman family moved to Weston Park. The house was built in 1599 by Sir Edward Devereux and extended by Sir John Bridgeman I about 100 years later. The Gardens were developed by several generations of the Bridgeman Family (later to become the Earls of Bradford) reaching peaks of excellence around 1760 and 1900. The Gardens fell into decline during the middle part of the twentieth century until they were rescued by the Trust in 1985. The Holly Maze is a distorted mirror image of the one at Hampton Court Palace designed by George London and Henry Wise. https://www.castlebromwichhallgardens.org.uk/
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Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery
The museum holds centuries of European history and culture and is home to art collections of international importance, there is also a celebration of local and industrial history in the ever-changing exhibitions. http://visitbirmingham.com/what-to-do/heritage-culture/birmingham-museums-art-gallery/
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George Square
The heart of the city, nestled between Glasgow City Chambers and Queen Street train station, is a sprawling square sporting a baker's dozen worth of statues. Ironically, the only statue missing is the titular George himself, King George III. Although one was originally planned, the planning and building of the Square itself coincided with the War of American Independence in the late 1700s. This caused many problems for the so called “Tobacco Lords,” Glaswegian merchants who made their fortunes in trade with the American colonies. This animosity was compounded by loss of the war in 1783, coupled with the fact that the monarch was gripped by insanity leading to his nickname, “The Mad King.” As a result, the powers in Glasgow decided instead to erect the first ever memorial commemorating Sir Walter Scott, the famous Scottish novelist. He is in good company, joined by fellow poets Robert Burns and Thomas Campbell, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, Prime Ministers Robert Peel and William Ewart Gladstone along with MP James Oswald, army commanders Lord Clyde and Sir John Moore, with engineer James Watt and chemist Thomas Graham. http://www.discoverglasgow.org/statues-george-square/4578641110
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People's Palace
The People’s Palace is set in historic Glasgow Green. It is home to a collection of objects, photographs, prints and film which give a unique view into how Glaswegians lived, worked and played in years gone by to the present day. https://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/museums/venues/peoples-palace
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Glasgow Cathedral
“A fantastic way to travel back in time”. That’s how one visitor recently described this superb medieval cathedral. Just 10 minutes walk from the city centre, it’s the only medieval cathedral on the Scottish mainland to have survived the 1560 Reformation almost entirely intact. https://peoplemakeglasgow.com/things-to-do/top-attractions/glasgow-cathedral
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Glasgow Museums
The City of Glasgow owns one of the richest collections in Europe, displayed in 8* museums and galleries across the city. From paintings by Degas and Cezanne to Sir Roger the Elephant, Charles Rennie Mackintosh furniture to a real Spitfire, fabulous arms and armour to cutting edge contemporary art, Glasgow Museums have objects and exhibits to fire your imagination. https://peoplemakeglasgow.com/things-to-do/top-attractions/glasgow-museums
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Kirkstall Abbey
Explore one of the most complete examples of a medieval Cistercian abbey in Britain. Set in wonderful parkland along the banks of the River Aire, Kirkstall Abbey boast historic architecture amid a haven of wildlife and greenery. Kirkstall Abbey Visitor Centre tells you more about the lives of the 12th century monks and contains the touch table, a unique catalogue of images of the abbey from the 18th century to the present day. Kirkstall Abbey is directly across the road from Abbey House Museum, this is a great opportunity to make a day out for all the family. https://www.visitleeds.co.uk/things-to-do/thedms.aspx?dms=3&venue=1581272&feature=1
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Lotherton Hall
Enjoy a fantastic day out at Lotherton Hall, a great day out for the family. This charming Edwardian country estate once home to the Gascoigne family offers you plenty of choice things to do and see. Visit the house to see what life was like in Edwardian times, go back in time by dressing up in our children’s area, or travel around the world with the new interactive ‘The Gascoignes Abroad’. Make sure to take a stroll around the fabulous bird garden and see owls, flamingos and much more! Plus walk around the stunning grounds and visit the historic stables and carriage displays. Also, there is a choice of two play areas including the woodland play area for older kids. https://www.visitleeds.co.uk/things-to-do/thedms.aspx?dms=3&venue=1581393&festival=4306&feature=2
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Harewood House
Harewood’s history is still evolving – always changing, always striving to stay relevant to the present day. It must be alive, cared for by the people who inhabit it and enjoyed by the people who visit it. Harewood is a living history, one with many stories still to tell. http://harewood.org/about/
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Opera North
Opera North is England’s national opera company in the North and one of Europe’s leading arts organisations. https://www.operanorth.co.uk/about
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Royal Mile
Edinburgh's Royal Mile is the heart of Scotland's historic capital. A short walk away is the Grassmarket, an area steeped in the city's colourful history. The Royal Mile runs through the heart of Edinburgh’s Old Town, connecting the magnificent Edinburgh Castle, perched high on a base of volcanic rock, with the splendorous Palace of Holyroodhouse, resting in the shadow of Arthur's Seat. The Mile is overlooked by impressive, towering tenements, between which cobbled closes and narrow stairways interlock to create a secret underground world. Peppered with superb attractions such as The Real Mary King’s Close or the Scottish Storytelling Centre, historical sites including St Giles' Cathedral and some of the best eating and drinking spots in the city, the Royal Mile offers much to see and do. For a glimpse of recent history, be sure to visit the ultra-modern Scottish Parliament, a striking building boasting a cutting-edge design. https://www.visitscotland.com/info/towns-villages/royal-mile-and-grassmarket-p918401
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Lauriston Castle
With its calm, tranquil atmosphere, and stunning views across the Firth of Forth, Lauriston is the perfect place to escape from the bustle of the city centre. Enjoy a woodland walk, a visit to award-winning Japanese garden, or step back in time and experience what life was like in an Edinburgh middle-class home at the beginning of the 20th century. https://www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/venue/lauriston-castle
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Museum of Edinburgh
Discover Edinburgh’s fascinating history through the Museum of Edinburgh’s wide and varied collections. In exploring the Museum’s maze of 16th-century buildings, you will see iconic items, beautiful objects and learn fascinating facts and gruesome tales. This free museum is easy to locate on the historic Royal Mile, with our companion Museum The People’s Story directly across the road. With a wide range of stories and objects, this museum has something for young and old, locals and visitors. In addition to the permanent collections, there is a regular programme of special exhibitions hosted at the museum. https://www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/venue/museum-edinburgh
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Scott Monument
Standing proudly in Princes Street Gardens, the Scott Monument is one of the most iconic Edinburgh landmarks, a must-visit for tourists and locals alike. Dedicated to Sir Walter Scott, it is one of the largest monuments to a writer anywhere in the world. Sitting proudly at the base of the monument is Sir Walter himself, carved in Carrara marble by Sir John Steel. This monumental statue, fashioned from a single piece of marble weighing 30 tons, took the sculptor six years to complete. It features Scott and his beloved hound Maida. Join one of the tour guides to find out who Sir Walter Scott was, why such an impressive monument was in his honour and enjoy the breathtaking views of Edinburgh from the third-floor viewing platform - a truly unforgettable experience! https://www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/venue/scott-monument
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Edinburgh Castle
Edinburgh Castle is one of the most exciting historic sites in Western Europe, Set in the heart of Scotland's dynamic capital city it is sure to capture your imagination. The scenery will take your breath away. https://www.edinburghcastle.gov.uk/visit
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Craigmillar Castle
The castle of Craigmillar is one of the most perfectly preserved castles in Scotland. Even today, the castle retains the character of a medieval stronghold. Building began in the early 15th century, and over the next 250 years the castle became a comfortable residence surrounded by fine gardens and pastureland. The castles history is not only closely involved with the city of Edinburgh, but plays an important part in the story of Mary Queen of Scots who fled to Craigmillar Castle following the murder of Rizzio. It was in the castle where the plot was hatched to murder Marys husband, Lord Darnley. https://www.visitscotland.com/info/see-do/craigmillar-castle-p245831
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National Monument of Scotland
The National Monument of Scotland, on Calton Hill in Edinburgh, is Scotland’s national memorial to the Scottish soldiers and sailors who died fighting in the Napoleonic War. http://www.eyeonedinburgh.net/monuments/calton-hill/national-monument-scotland/
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Clifton Suspension Bridge
The Clifton Suspension Bridge’s spectacular setting on the cliffs of the Avon Gorge has made it the defining symbol of Bristol, drawing thousands of visitors a year just to stroll across for views of the ancient Avon Gorge, elegant Clifton and the magnificent city beyond. https://visitbristol.co.uk/things-to-do/clifton-suspension-bridge-p24661
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Cabot Tower & Brandon Hill
Cabot Tower, set in the gorgeous parkland of Brandon Hill near Park Street in the West End, is a 105ft tower built in 1897 to commemorate John Cabot's famous voyage from Bristol and the continent of North America four hundred years earlier. Brandon Hill is the oldest park in Bristol, where you can enjoy great views over the city and Harbourside area. Located just off Park Street in the West End, Brandon Hill features a children's play area, beautiful paths and a nature conservation area, and of course the icon of Bristol's skyline, Cabot Tower. Designed by the Bristol architect William Venn Gough and paid for by public subscription, the tower is built from red sandstone covered with cream Bath stone. Located in the centre of the park. It's free to climb up the steep, twisting steps of the tower, which is open daily. https://visitbristol.co.uk/things-to-do/cabot-tower-and-brandon-hill-p24401
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Bristol Old Vic Theatre
Built in 1766, Bristol Old Vic is the oldest continuously working theatre in the English speaking world, and remains a place of joy, discovery and adventure to this day. A multi-million-pound two-phase redevelopment project first provided state of the art rehearsal rooms, a dramatically extended forestage and precision engineered sightlines, giving audiences an even more intimate theatrical experience. The second phase is now complete: the new fully-accessible front of house boasts a bar and kitchen, open sun-up to curtain-down, alongside a new interactive heritage offering and a brand new Studio Theatre. The theatre’s mission is to create pioneering twenty-first century theatre in partnership with the people of their energetic city; inspired by the history and magical design of the most beautiful playhouse in the country. They are publicly funded by Arts Council England and Bristol City Council, using that investment to support experiment and innovation, to allow access to their programme for people who would not otherwise encounter it or be able to afford it and to keep their extraordinary heritage alive and animated. https://visitbristol.co.uk/things-to-do/bristol-old-vic-theatre-p24321
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Pero
Pero's Bridge is a pedestrian footbridge that spans Bristol's floating harbour, and was named in honour of Pero Jones, who came to live in Bristol as the slave of John Pinney. https://visitbristol.co.uk/things-to-do/peros-bridge-p269523
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Arnolfini
Arnolfini is a centre for contemporary arts based on Bristol’s harbourside in the heart of the city. Founded in 1961, the organisation is dedicated to producing and presenting visual arts, performance, dance, film, music and events, underpinned by a commitment to a dynamic civic role in the city. https://visitbristol.co.uk/things-to-do/arnolfini-p23871
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Tyntesfield
At its heart Tyntesfield is a Victorian country house and estate, which serves as a backdrop to the remarkable story of four generations of the Gibbs family. Their tale charts the accumulation of wealth from the guano trade, transformation of a Georgian house to a Victorian Gothic masterpiece and the collection of over 50,000 objects. https://visitbristol.co.uk/things-to-do/tyntesfield-p132323
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Belgrave Hall & Gardens
Belgrave Hall is a historic house, providing an oasis of peace and quiet in a busy city. The hall was built in the early 18th century in what was then a small village three miles from the town of Leicester. Now city traffic passes, almost unnoticed, just beyond the garden walls. Edmund Cradock, a hosiery merchant, built Belgrave Hall but died soon after its completion. The Hall has had several owners over the years, including John Ellis – a wealthy businessman who was responsible for bringing the railways to Leicester. Visitors can explore Belgrave Hall and the beautiful surrounding gardens on special event days. From April to September the gardens are open every Wednesday and the first full weekend of the month, with additional special events open to the public. Visit the website for more details on specific open days. https://www.visitleicester.info/see-and-do/belgrave-hall-and-gardens-p696521
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Abbey Park
Hugging the banks of the River Soar in the north of the city is Abbey Park – a beautiful green space to relax and admire Leicester’s riverside scenery. The park has a choice of activities to keep the whole family entertained. The boating lake in the centre of the park offers hire of both rowing and pedalo boats – fun for adults and children alike! On a summer’s day, relax and pedal your way around the beautiful lake in the centre of the park, enjoying the sweeping views of serene parkland all around. Heritage lovers will enjoy a stroll around the remains of the twelfth century Leicester Abbey and the ruins of Cavendish House, a 17th century mansion. The Abbey was founded by the second Earl of Leicester, Robert le Bossu. It became one of the wealthiest Augustinian abbeys in the country, but closed in 1538 when Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries. Whilst converting the overgrown abbey grounds into a public excavations revealed the remains of the abbey church and the other main building ranges, which can be seen in the park today. Those looking to get active can take advantage of the parks many sporting facilities, including a bowling green, five hard surface tennis courts, orienteering courses, a lavender maze and Ping! table tennis tables – perfect for those looking to try something new or get in some extra practise. Pets Corner is a favourite with all visitors to the park – an area to interact with a variety of small, domesticated animals. The area includes an aviary with a collection of exotic birds, as well as small enclosures housing hens, guinea pigs, rabbits, goats and pygmy goats. https://www.visitleicester.info/see-and-do/abbey-park-p707941
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