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Valletta

Country: Malta
Population:514,564
Time Zone:UTC+2
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Monastery of San Nicolo l'Arena
The monastic building, which was founded in the 1500’s and has developed up to today, is an example of architectural integration throughout the periods, marked by multiple transformations. Today it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
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San Benedetto
Already UNESCO heritage in the city of Catania, it was originally erected in 1355, to be rebuilt after the tragic earthquake of Val di Noto, in the early 1700s.
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Church of Santa Maria della Catena
Built around the 1500s by architect Matteo Carnilivari, he took this name, as on one of the walls of the church was an end of the chain that closed the port of Cala.
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Teatro Massimo
An artwork of imposing beauty that welcomes tourists and Palermitans who make an appointment every day on the steps of what is considered an inevitable stage of the city center.
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Free Palermo Theater
A place of research and experimentation, identification and presentation of new dramas, elaboration and production of own works, promotion and dissemination of theater
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The Pepoli Regional Museum
The Regional Museum hosts numerous paintings, representing the artistic culture of the western Sicily between the XIII and the XIX century; sculptures, including those of the “gaginesca” school; craft cribs wood-made realised in the city of Trapani; jewels from the treasure of the Madonna of Trapani, traditional silvers and corals which were once mainly produced in Trapani;
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The Cathedral of San Lorenzo
The Cathedral of San Lorenzo is a beautiful church in Trapani raised to a minor basilica by Pope Gregory XVI , which is located in the historic center and is the main place of Catholic worship.
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The Karamanli (Qaramanli) House
The House of Karamanli, or al-Qaramanli House, was built in the second half of the 18th century, during the reign of Ali Pasha Alqaramanli, and was used by Yousuf Pasha until his death. The house was restored during the early 1990s and became known as Tripoli Historical Exhibition.
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Tripoli
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The Red Castle or Assaraya Alhamra
The castle was the seat of power in Tripolitania ever since the Turkish Pashas used it as their official headquarters in the 16th century, and remained so until recently when things began to change after the colonial wars at the start of the 20th century.
City
Tripoli
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The Old City (Medina)
The Old City (or Old Medina), with its labyrinthine dark lanes, is an exotic place to see, bustling with life and shoppers and oozing with rich aromas of spices, coffee, nuts, falafel and freshly-made sweets.
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Tripoli
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Map
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Leptis Magna
Leptis Magna is an archaeological site in the northern part of Libya. It is located in the Al Khums region, with the Mediterranean coast on one side and the Sahara Desert on the other. Owing to its location near the Mediterranean Sea the area has a more temperate climate than the interiors of the country. The impact of the desert keeps the climate dry with very hot summers and pleasant winters, rainfall is minimal.
City
Tripoli
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The Souk
The Souk in Tunis feels a lot less touristy than those in some North African towns and cities; it is a vibrant place where people live and work. Because of this and because people are primarily interested in going about their business they will not bother you as a tourist.
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Zitouna Mosque
A great attraction is the Zitouna Mosque, not only is it Tunisia’s largest, it dates from the 8th century. Although non-Muslims are not permitted into the Mosque you can visit the courtyard and take it much of the architecture including the distinctive minaret, a 19th century addition.
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Bardo Museum
Tunis’ must see attractions is the Bardo Museum: partly for the collection and partly because it is located in a marvellous 13th Century Ottoman palace. The museum itself covers the entire history of Tunisia: that is a lot to take in so allow a full day.
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Temple of Juno Lacinia
This temple was constructed on a mostly artificial spur. It dates to c. 450 BC, measuring 38.15 x 16.90 m: it is in Doric style, peripteros with 6 x 13 columns, preceded by a pronaos and opisthodomos. The basement has four steps. Current remains (including anastylosis from the 18th century onwards) the front columnade with parts of the architrave and of the frieze (only fragments of the other three sides are present), with few elements of the cella. The building was damaged in the fire of 406 BC and restored in Roman times, with the substitution of the roof tiles with marble ones and the addition of a steep rise in the are where today can be seen the remains of the altar. Nearby are arcosolia and other sepultures from Byzantine times, belonging to the late 6th century AD renovation of the Temple of Concordia into a Christian church.
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Capo Colonna
Symbol of the city’s millenary history, the Doric column erected on the Capocolonna promontory (at about 13 km from the centre of Crotone) carries an echo of the splendour of the Magna Grecia period. It is the only remaining column of the temple dedicated to the goddess Hera. Dating back to the 6th century B.C., it was one of the most important religious locations in Magna Gr�cia, upon which today stands Capocolonna Archaeological Park. The Park is made of roughly 30,000 square meters of terrain allocated for excavations which brought to light the foundations of different buildings and domestic locations, along with 20 hectares of Mediterranean woods in which are present pleasant natural trails that lead from the museum to the column.
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National Archaeological Museum
The National Archaeological Museum of Crotone, open to the public since 1968, is amongst the most important of Calabria. The building, designed by architect Franco Minissi, is located at one of the bastions of the sixteenth century city wall, near the Castle of Charles V, in the historical heart of the town.
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The Castle of Charles V
The castle acropolis Commonly called the Castle of Charles V by the imperial coat of arms that was located there, it was created as a rudimental fortress on the ancient Greek Acropolis, to defend the country from foreign invasion.
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Old Town Centre
The Old Town Centre of Crotone is easily identified because it is situated on a hill, close to the sea, enclosed until the end of 800, from the sixteenth century city wall with a very ancient history. According to archaeologists, the acropolis of the ancient Kroton stood here. It is said to house, among other buildings, the Temple of the Muses, home of the Pythagorean school, known throughout the Mediterranean. It is a very layered urban fabric, which for the continuous destruction, reconstruction, alterations, increases in volume that are superimposed over the course of three centuries, which have no name of the type Byzantine, Medieval,Renaissance, Baroque. The city was subjected to several foreign domination over the centuries whose influence is reflected in the heterogeneous style of its old town center. The types are mostly composite, with many terraced houses, narrow winding streets, wherein the worship buildings and noble palaces are concentrated in little squares. Political power and religious power are added together in these contexts of social life, where shops of merchants and artisans overlook the, but on which lies primarily the importance of the church, the convent of the palace. While Castle Square preserves the centuries the peculiarity of Square of arms, Dome Square, the political center of the city is the seat of Royal House, the Bishop's Palace, and of course the Cathedral church. At Suriano Square Suriano (now Umberto I Square), destined for popular assemblies, dominate the convent of St. Francis of Assisi, now the Seminary, with the annexed church and mansions of Suriano (now Albani Palace),and the Marquis Berlingeri.
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Cilento and Vallo di Diano National Park
Cilento e Vallo di Diano National Park is the second-largest park in Italy. It stretches from the Tyrrhenian coast to the foot of the Apennines in Campania and Basilicata, and it includes the peaks of Alburni Mountains, Cervati and Gelbison and the coastal buttresses of Mt. Bulgheria and Mt. Stella. The extraordinary naturalistic richness of the heterogeneous territory goes hand in hand with the mythical and mysterious character of a land rich in history and culture: from the call of the nymph Leucosia to the beaches where Palinuro left Aeneas, from the ruins of the Greek colonies of Elea and Paestum to the wonderful Certosa of Padula. And everything else you can find in such an unexplored territory. The National Park of Cilento and Vallo di Diano houses many animal species. Their undisputed queen is undoubtedly the golden eagle that nests on the highest peaks. But other birds fly over the territory of the Park, including peregrine falcons, buzzards, sparrow hawk, owl and the owl. The territory is also inhabited by wolves, wild boars, foxes, martens, badgers, weasels and other mammals that bear witness to the progressive enrichment of the ecosystem of the Park of Cilento.
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Path of the Gods
The Path of the Gods links Agerola, a small village over the hills of the Amalfi Coast, to Nocelle, a fraction of Positano which is located on the slopes of Monte Pertuso. The name hints at the spectacle of the path: follow it in the direction that goes from Agerola to Nocelle so walking slightly downhill and get in front of the scenery of the Amalfi Coast and Capri. The Path of the Gods starts from Bomerano, fraction of Agerola. To reach Agerola there are Sita buses leaving from Amalfi, ask the driver for the stop Bomerano. From there follow the road signs that will take you at the entrance of the path. The Path of the Gods can also be reached from Praiano but you have to face a long flight of steps to go from sea level to 580 meters high to the pass of Colle Serra.
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Amalfi Cathedral
Amalfi Cathedral is a 9th-century Roman Catholic structure in the Piazza del Duomo, Amalfi, Italy. It is dedicated to the Apostle Saint Andrew. Predominantly of Arab-Norman Romanesque architectural style, it has been remodelled several times, adding Romanesque, Byzantine, Gothic, and Baroque elements. The cathedral includes the adjoining 9th-century Basilica of the Crucifix. Leading from the basilica are steps into the Crypt of St. Andrew. A wooden 13th-century Crucifix hangs in the liturgical area. Another crucifix, made of mother-of-pearl, was brought from the Holy Land and is located to the right of the back door. The High Altar in the central nave is formed from the sarcophagus of the Archbishop Pietro Capuano (died in 1214). Above the altar is a painting by Andrea dell'Asta of The Martyrdom of St. Andrew. The front facade was rebuilt in 1891 after the original one collapsed. It is of striped marble and stone with open arches that have lace detailing not commonly found in Italian sacred architecture while the tiled cupola is quite common amongst churches of the area. The tympanum's mosaics portray “The triumph of Christ” in a work created by Domenico Morelli and whose original designs are retained in the Town Hall.
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Amalfi Paper Museum
Among the first towns where it was discovered in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries the existence of the paper, if you want to take for granted the information contained in notarial deeds discussing of the existence of paper products, while not specifying whether these were imported from other places and traded in the above-mentioned places, there were the territories of the Maritime Republics: Amalfi, Pisa, Genoa and Venice who had warehouses both in Syria, both on the coast of Palestine, where they were precisely located the major centres for the production of paper. These republics also had intense trade relations with the East and they could learn from the Eastern art of making paper without too much difficulty, or it is possible that on board the galleys, which in medieval times shuttled between our coasts and the Holy Land to transport crusaders and merchandises, they are embarked "Magisters in art cartarum" which as skilled labour have introduced this type of work. Amalfi is the oldest of the Maritime Republics, as early as the ninth century had its warehouses in Palermo and Messina and Syracuse, where the Amalfitana is still present in local place names. Age-old remains the question on the primacy of paper in Italy and then in Europe and in contention are mainly Amalfi and Fabriano.
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Villa Cimbrone
Sitting high atop a promontory that offers stunning views of the Mediterranean and the dramatic coastline below, the Villa Cimbrone is the crown laurel of Ravello. Its origins date back to the 11th century, but the villa and the gardens were extensively renovated by a British nobleman, Lord Grimthorpe, in the early 20th century. With its expansive gardens and dramatic views, the villa is a popular place for weddings, honeymoons, and receptions. The villa is a private 5-star hotel (Hotel Villa Cimbrone), but the gardens are open to the public and it ranks, perhaps, as the most memorable sight on the Amalfi Coast. A century ago, shortly after it was renovated by Grimthorpe, the Villa Cimbrone became a popular retreat for London’s famed Bloomsbury Group, a circle of early 20th century intellectuals that featured Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey. Other noted guests, included Winston Churchill, author E.M Forster, and famed economist Maynard Keynes. D.H. Lawrence, the author of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, literally left his mark on the villa’s garden, when he and a friend decided to give the Statue of Eve a fresh, and unauthorized, coat of paint.
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Villa Rufolo
Built by a wealthy merchant family in the 13th century, the villa has a rich and storied past. Boccaccio, one of the earliest authors of the Italian renaissance, wrote a story about the villa and its owner in his Decameron, which was published in 1353. In its prime, it was one of the largest and most expensive villas on the Amalfi Coast, and legends grew about hidden treasure on its premises. In the 14th century, the Rufolo family hosted banquets for King Robert II of Naples and other Norman royalty. The gardens and grounds of the Villa Rufolo are open year around and attract visitors from all over the world. Juxtaposed against the sea, the sky, umbrella pines, and the Church of the Annunziata below, the gardens, with their profusion of flowers, have a magical quality to them.
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Cathedral of Ravello
Built in the 11th century with support from the Rufolo family, the Duomo is a combination of Baroque and Romanesque styles. Dedicated to St. Pantaleone, the church has undergone extensive modifications and restorations over the past 900 years. The Duomo’s shining white façade dates back to the last major restoration in 1931. The Duomo’s bell tower, which dates back to the 13th century, shows Moorish and Byzantine influence. Today, the Duomo is primarily remembered for five attractions: The first is the bronze door, which was temporarily removed for restoration in 2010. Constructed in 1179 by Barisano da Trani, the door is of special interest because fewer than two dozen bronze church doors are still extant in Italy, three of them by Trani. The second item of special note is the pulpit, which is supported by six spiraled columns sitting atop marble lions. Across from the pulpit, to the left, is the Ambo of the Epistles that boasts two wonderful mosaics of Jonah and the Whale. The fourth area of special interest is the Chapel of St. Pantaleone the Healer, a 3rd century physician who was beheaded, on orders of the Emperor Diocletian, after he converted to Christianity. The Chapel has a small ampoule of the saint’s blood, which is said to liquefy every year on July 27th, the anniversary of his martyrdom. The chapel also has a silver bust of the town’s venerated saint. The final attraction is the cathedral's museum, which is accessible through a side entrance on the Via Richard Wagner.
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The Duomo of Salerno
Cattedrale di San Matteo—the cathedral of Salerno—houses ancient Greek columns, Roman sarcophagi, medieval pulpits, and the body of St. Matthew the Evangelist Although World War II bombs devastated most of medieval Salerno, the Duomo's lovely 11th-century atrium courtyard was spared. It contains 28 antique columns pilfered from the ancient Greek ruins of Paestum. Behind them are Roman sarcophagi recycled in the Middle Ages as the tombs for local grandees. The cathedral was founded in 1081 by Hauteville Norman adventurer Robert Guiscard who by then had conquered his way to becoming Duke of Apulia and Calabria (which, at the time, covered pretty much all of southern Italy; the neighbouring Dutchy of Naples was confined just the sliver of land around the Bay of Naples itself). Robert was, for good measure, also Duke of Sicily. An earthquake in 1688 caused most of the cathedral to be rebuilt along baroque lines, though from the older church remain a fabulous pair of inlaid ambones (pulpits) similar to those at Ravello. Proof that the city of Salerno was once a much bigger deal than it is today: The cathedral crypt, lavishly decorated with precious marbles in the 17th century (and restructured in the 1960s), houses the bones of St. Matthew the Evangelist.
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Castello Arechi
This castle, located on the Bonadies Mountain, was built in the VII century on behalf of the Lombard Prince Arechi II who moved the capital of the Dukedom from Benevento to Salerno. To this day, the castle still dominates and guards over the city.
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Pompeii
Pompeii was probably founded by the Oscans around the 8th century BC. This ancient Italic people settled on the southern slopes of Mount Vesuvius along the banks of the Sarno River, which was navigable at the time. Pompeii became an important commercial center early on, catching the interest of the invading Greeks and Etruscans. The Etruscans were conquered on the waters off Cuma, and the city came under domination by the Samnites in the 5th century BC
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Herculaneum
Ercolano, known to many as Herculaneum, is just a few miles from Pompeii and 150 miles south of Rome, close to Naples. In many respects Ercolano is a smaller version of Pompeii, both are buried Roman cities that have been remarkably preserved when excavated. A lot of people prefer Ercolano to Pompeii as it is a much more compact size and has significantly less visitors. Both sites are managed by the same people and it is easy to visit both in one day using a combined ticket and the local train which connects both. Both sites are managed by the same people and it is easy to visit both in one day using a combined ticket and the local train which connects both.
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Mount Vesuvius
Mount Vesuvius is famous as the volcano that erupted in Roman times (AD 79) and buried Pompeii. The volcano is just 6 miles from the modern city of Naples and is a very popular visitor attraction with a lot of visitors coupling a half day at Pompeii with a visit to Mount Vesuvius. Mount Vesuvius is one of the world's most dangerous volcanoes. The volcano has an eruption cycle of about 20 years, but the last eruption was in 1944. Nevertheless, this doesn't stop thousands of tourists visiting the world-famous volcano every year. Since 1995 the volcano has been a National Park.