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Pierre Baudis Japanese Garden
If you would like enjoy a journey to the Orient, treat yourself to a Zen promenade in the Japanese Garden, which is labelled a Remarkable Garden. Situated in the heart of Compans-Caffarelli Park, this garden’s exotic feel is a surprise. A veritable invitation to meditate and relax, it is a synthesis of the gardens you can find in Kyoto, Japan, constructed between the XIV and XVI Centuries. It is made up of all the characteristic elements: a showcase of the worlds of minerals and plants and the aquatic world complete with traditional decorative features. You can discover a rock garden with islands devoted to the crane and the turtle, nine rocks, a lake, a tea pavilion and a landscaped garden featuring a dry waterfall, Japanese stepping stones, a lantern, a red bridge, an Island of Paradise, a Mount Fuji and the headstones of three saints.
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The Augustins Museum
A museum rich in sculptures, the Musée des Augustins has a unique collection of Roman sculptures and also masterpieces from the area’s Gothic era as well as numerous 19th Century sculptures representing the vitality of Toulouse’s artistic creation.
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Couvent Des Jacobins
In this building entirely made of bricks, the contrast between its massive or even austere aspect of the exterior and the extraordinary lightness of the interior architecture where the famous palm-tree ribs thrust upwards.
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Basilica of Saint-Sernin
The largest church (115 metres in length), a jewel of Roman art begun in 1075 and consecrated in 1096. Pilgrimage church, designed to receive the crowds of pilgrims walking towards Compostela, and to shelter a religious community. One of the symbols of Toulouse, this basilica of brick and stone is certainly imposing. Majestic and luminous, it was built between the XI and XIV Centuries in honour of St Saturnin (or Sernin), the first bishop of the city. An important stop along the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela, it inspires reverence and its vast proportions are ideal for strolling past the numerous reliquaries.
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Cite de l'espace
Walking on the moon, stepping aboard the Mir Space Station, gazing at the Ariane 5 rocket, dreaming with your head in the stars… You can do all of this at the Cité de l’Espace, a short hop from the centre of Toulouse. The Cité offers 2,500m² of interactive exhibitions to help you become an expert on the Earth and the Universe as you learn everything about space flight and even find out how to predict the weather. You can train like a genuine astronaut thanks to the moonwalk simulator and explore the life of astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Try on a space suit, jump into a lunar rover… Its 5 hectares of gardens, which are home to life-sized replicas of spacecraft and a giant telescope, its IMAX® cinema with giant screen, its interactive planetarium and countless activities for young and old alike make this journey into outer space even more fun.
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Le Capitole
In Toulouse there is no Mairie, but rather a majestic Capitole! An emblematic building, it is home to the town hall, a theatre and rooms of state where you can bump into celebrities from the city. The seat of municipal power since its construction, commissioned by the Capitouls in the XII Century, transformed and embellished in every era, La Capitole shows its majestic Neo-Classical façade to the unmistakable square that shares its name. Its walls could tell of the great moments in the history of Toulouse: from the Cathar episode to the creation of the Floral Games, from the Counts of Toulouse to the siege of the city. On the first floor, you cross magnificent reception rooms that are decorated with the Allegories of Love by Paul Gervais, 10 giant canvases by Henri Martin and, notably, the Salle des Illustres whose paintings retrace the history of Toulouse and whose busts bring back to life the personalities that have defined the city.
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Hotel D'assezat
A short hop from the Pont Neuf, a monumental stone doorway hides a masterpiece of the Classical Renaissance. You can even take tea here in the summer, if you are brave enough to face the lions and warriors… The sumptuous courtyard of honour is the backdrop for two façades punctuated by antique columns and linked by a stairway tower. Everything matches the level of ambition of the man that commissioned it, Pierre d’Assézat, merchant and Capitoul of Toulouse, who made his fortune from pastel in the XVI Century. Bequeathed to the city in 1895, it was then home to the academies and learned societies where the Floral Games were created in 1323. It was this exceptional venue that was selected by the Argentine Georges Bemberg in which to display his collection of art, which you can explore at the foundation that shares his name. Beneath the loggia, you can quench your thirst as you contemplate the courtyard and façades of the most beautiful Renaissance mansion house of Toulouse.
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Fondation Bemberg
This museum that brings together works from the Renaissance and Impressionist masterpieces can be found in the most beautiful mansion house of the city: a feast for the eyes. This foundation housed in the Hôtel d’Assézat and created by Argentinian collector Georges Bemberg brings together numerous works of western art from the Renaissance to the early XX Century. In the Renaissance-style salons, the first floor brings back to life the interiors of different eras by combining period furniture, tableaux and objet d’art. The 2nd floor is given over to modern paintings and it is important not to miss the 35 tableaux by post-impressionist Bonnard. Among the artists on display we find Guardi, Cranach the Elder, Veronese, Titian, Fantin-Latour… In order to fully appreciate this visit, lift your gaze and admire the well-preserved XVI Century ceiling on the 1st floor.
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Eglise Saint Vincent Church
A fine example of Languedoc Gothic with a wide nave (20.25 m) and an imposing vault (23,5m). A square-based, 54 m high octagonal tower houses a 47 bell carillon. Public access is free (232 steps), and offers a breathtaking view of the entire town of Carcassonne.
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The Midi Canal
The work of Pierre-Paul Riquet carried out in the 17th century to link the Atlantic to the Mediterranean, the Midi Canal has been listed as a UNESCO world heritage since 1996.
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Musee Des Beaux Arts
The paintings and ceramics make this museum a splendid panoramic survey of European art from the 17th century to the present day. Educational tours throughout the school year.
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Viaduc de Millau
Millau viaduct holds the world record for the tallest bridge, culminating at 343 metres (higher than the Eiffel tower), 2460 metres long and touching the bottom of the Tarn valley in only 9 places. Conceived by the French engineer Michel Virlogeux and designed by the English architect Lord Norman Foster, it fits perfectly into the naturally intact and grandiose landscape: a very thin slightly curved steel roadway supported by stays gives it the appearance of a huge yacht and the ensemble rests on 7 very slender pillars. This unique viewing area, created in the old cassonade farm of Brocuéjouls, is the ideal place for discovering Millau viaduct, the Aveyron, its cultural and natural heritage and the local gastronomy. Both a “viewing area” and “tourist information centre”, it also offers a “gastronomical area”. Take a few minutes to climb to the belvedere viewing point from where you can admire the sublime and panoramic view of the viaduct. You can then taste, amongst other things, the famous “capucins” made by the Michelin starred chef Michel Bras in the gastronomical area or learn all there is to know about the viaduct and its construction in the Eiffage company Expo/Boutique area.
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Beffroi de Millau
Square tower from the end of the 12th century, erected for the king of Aragon Alphonse II, surmounted in the 17th century by an octagonal tower intended to receive the communal drone and the clock. 42 meters high, 210 steps to climb to reach the summit and admire the panorama of the city and the surrounding causses. Last climb, 1/2 hour before closing. Out of season open for groups by reservation.
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Musee de Millau et des Grands Causses
In the centre of Millau, a town hotel from the 18th century houses the museum: 30 exposition rooms dedicated to palaeontology, prehistory and regional archaeology, as well as traditional activities of leather craft and glove-making. Palaeontology: diverse fossils including the famous skeleton of an elasmosaur. Pre-history: furniture from the palaeolithic to the monolithic. Archaeology: the most important collection of vases from the Roman Empire with the production of the Graufesenque workshops. Leather and gloves: a DVD film retraces the specific savoir-faire, rich of ancestral traditions and modern techniques enabling skins to be worked on. A recreated workshop shows how gloves were made. Free for the individuals the first Saturday of the month.
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La Graufesenque
In the 1st century AD, for two centuries, more than 600 potters produced the red, shiny sigillated ceramics, distributed throughout the Roman Empire. The remains of workshops, ovens, residential houses, sanctuary bear witness to this. Historical presentation. The circuit on the site. Visit a part of the village of Gallo-Roman potters with a view of sanctuaries, baking ovens, workshops and residential houses. The visit lasts on average one hour.
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Canal du Midi
Ranking World Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO December 7, 1996 has given a soul to one of the oldest still operating channels, now dedicated to tourism. Built during the reign of Louis XIV, from 1667 to 1681, called the Royal Canal to the French Revolution, a distance of 240 km. Large 20 to 24 m, 2 m deep on average, there are 69 locks and 350 works spanning his course and facilitate its airworthiness.
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Boujan-sur-Libron
Probably built on the site of an ancient Roman villa, constant attacks led to the fortification of the village in a circular form.
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Fine Arts Museum
In addition to Degas's masterpiece " The Cotton Office in New Orleans" , the museum presents a very fine collection of paintings from Flemish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish and French schools from the 15th to the 20th century. It is the second museum of Aquitaine by the richness of its collections.
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The Joantho Gardens,
Facing the station, the Joantho Gardens, named after the Municipal Councilor, who proposed the plan to Henri Faisans, mayor of Pau from 1888 to 1908. The look is up: the magnificent perspective that is on the arches of the Boulevard des Pyrenees.
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National Museum of the Chateau de Pau
Restored in the 19th century and classified National Museum, it presents 1000 years of history and offers visitors a rich decorative ensemble, as well as an impressive collection of Gobelins tapestries from the 16th to the 19th century.
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Serignan
Over the centuries, the river Orb and the Mediterranean have shaped the history of Sérignan. As a direct result, the town now covers four distinct areas with different activities that can be all reached by bike.
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The Institut du Grenat
The Institut du Grenat (1901 law) is currently dedicating itself to the preservation of the traditional making as a cultural legacy so that this jewel becomes again a symbol of modernity, while conveying the values of a noble tradition.
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Catalan Barks
Stroll along the water in an electric boat, drive yourself on the Bass, in the heart of Perpignan! Up to 4 people per boat.
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The Sant Jordi
One of the legends attributed to Sant Jordi, which rapidly became the most famous, tells of a dragon who scared the inhabitants of a city. To calm it down, a lamb and a young girl chosen at random had to be offered every day.
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Sainte Anne square
When one gets to place Sainte-Anne (Sainte Anne square), one is surprised by the majestic Sainte-Anne Church (whose bell tower can be seen from anywhere in the city).
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The Fabre museum
The Fabre museum itself is an astounding work of art, an innovative combination of classic and contemporary architecture. Today, the museum offers over 800 works, 900 engravings and 3,500 drawings in its 9,200 m² exhibit area.
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Place de la Comedie
Place de la Comédie is Montpellier's central square. Also known as l'OEuf (the Egg) because of its original oval shape, it is one of the largest pedestrian areas in Europe.
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Porte Cailhau
Imbued with a long history, the Porte Cailhau offers a magnificent view of Bordeaux. Despite its age (just imagine – it dates from 1494!) this large, beautiful monument remains practically unchanged. It was built to commemorate Charles VIII's victory at Fornovo (Italy). This French king has left his mark on the tower since his likeness decorates a niche on the river side and a notice ask visitors to pay attention to the lintel and reminds them that Charles VIII died from walking quickly into just such a lintel... The Port Cailhau, thirty-five metres tall, was integrated into the city walls. In 1864, it was rented by a public letter writer and a person whose job was to weigh salt. They were both evicted in order to renovate the monument. There is a magnificent view of the oldest bridge in Bordeaux, the Pont de Pierre, from here. An exhibition displays the tools and materials used for construction purposes at the time the Porte Cailhau was built and an audio-visual presentation pieced together from old films immerses us in the world of stone masonry.
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The Saint Pierre District
Tourists who come to Bordeaux generally marvel at the beautiful buildings lining the quays before seeing anything else. However, many of them are unaware that the historic heart of Bordeaux is located behind the 18th century Place de la Bourse.
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Place de la Bourse
Place de la Bourse has symbolised the city of Bordeaux around the world for centuries and played a major role in the city's development, trade, and reputation. Both the Bordelais and visitors alike adore this very elegant square. It took 20 years of hard work in the 18th century to build what has since become the city's very symbol! The square represents a break with medieval Bordeaux surrounded by walls for centuries. The city was finally free to grow! Intendant Boucher had tried to convince the town aldermen and the parliament to create the square and open up the city walls since 1720. He decided to entrust Jacques Gabriel, Louis XV's "First Architect" with designing this rectangular square with bevelled corners, as well as constructing the famous buildings decorated with mascarons and wrought iron. The buildings framing this place royale consist of the Hôtel des Fermes, built by Gabriel's father, followed by the Hôtel de la Bourse built by Gabriel himself, and the isolated central pavilion (1735-1755). Place de la Bourse was originally separated from the river by railings, but these disappeared during the French Revolution. The equestrian statue of the king was briefly replaced by one of Napoleon, followed by the Fountain of the Three Graces in 1869…
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The Tower of Pey-Berland
Situated to the south-east of the chevet of the Cathedral of Saint-André at Bordeaux, the tower of Pey-Berland serves as its bell tower, built in the 15th century in the Gothic style.
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Bordeaux Canoe
Enjoy this guided canoe trip in Bordeaux. Garonne river let us appreciate the preserved nature, the water mirror, the stone bridge and the beautiful dockside.
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The Cite du Vin
Since June 1, 2016, Bordeaux has a contemporary monument, which illustrates the city's dedication to the fruit of the vine: La Cité du Vin.The purpose of this museum is to create a space where sensory experiences are centered wholly around wine. This site is fully dedicated to this "nectar," as a living piece of French history and culture
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Grand Theatre de Bordeaux
Of all the public buildings in Bordeaux, the Grand-Théâtre is unquestionably the most well-known and appreciated. It stands on the site of a former temple (Les Piliers de Tutelle) that was once in the middle of a Gallo-Roman forum. The Grand Théâtre's construction was made necessary by the destruction of a performance hall in 1755. The latter was located in the outbuildings of the former town hall, near the Grosse Cloche. Architect François Lhote, assisted by Soufflot, initially proposed a project that was not accepted by the city aldermen. Eventually, Marshal de Richelieu, governor of the province of Guyenne, imposed the Parisian architect Victor Louis (1731-1800). In order to pay for the construction, the land located on the southern glacis of the Château Trompette was sold. It took more than five years to build the Grand Théâtre and, after many vicissitudes, it was inaugurated in 1780 with a performance of Athalie, a play by Jean Racine. The rectangular-shaped structure opens up onto Place de la Comédie to the west with a peristyle featuring 12 Corinthian columns supporting an entablature and a balustrade decorated with 12 statues (the nine muses and three goddesses). At the beginning, this peristyle was on the same level as Place de la Comédie. However, in the mid-19th century, it was decided to lower the level to make it easier for horse-drawn carriages to cross. The Grand Théâtre was nevertheless innovative, and Victor Louis imagined a clever oblique arrangement of stones maintained by a metal tie beam at the angles of the peristyle in order to support them. This ingenious combination became known as "Victor Louis's nail".
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The Musee des Beaux-Arts of Bordeaux
The Musée des Beaux-Arts of Bordeaux exhibits works from the biggest names in European art, as well as artists from Bordeaux, coming from several periods of time and various schools.
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The Diocesan Cathedral Museum
This is an old Gothic building which dates back to the 13th and 14th century. Its altarpiece is a superb example of Spanish Renaissance sculpture carved in alabaster by Damián Forment between 1520 and 1533, representing the Passion of Christ.
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Huesca City Hall
This splendid old Aragonese Renaissance palace with imposing towers on either side, a wooden roof and imposing staircase forming a beautiful gallery, dates back to the 16th century. Inside the Court the old wooden roof and ceiling can be observed which continues into the old Hall of Justice housing the painting by Jose Casado del Alisal, dating back to 1880 and depicting the infamous legend of the Bell of Huesca. To the right of the City Hall is the old Imperial College Santiago, founded in 1534, which was once part of the most prestigious University of Huesca for over three hundred years.
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La Llotja de Lleida
La Llotja is a monolithic construction, subdivided into three functional levels allowing it to serve different purposes. The central level is the interconnecting core, linking up the various programmes by means of the central stairway/ramp, which also provides illumination.
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Chateau Prieure Lichine
Book a tasting and discover the incredible diversity of wines produced at Chateau Prieuré Lichine Although Benedictine monks were the first to cultivate vines here, the chateau is named after an indefatigable traveller, Alexis Lichine, became owner in 1951. Since 1999, the chateau has been under the ownership of the Balande family, who have taken steps to modernise this historically unconventional estate. After learning about the extraordinary history of this Fourth Growth chateau, visitors are invited to discover the art of producing fine wine. In the heart of a unique, fascinating terroir, contemporary winegrowing techniques (including a resolutely modern cellar building) are at the forefront of production at Chateau Prieuré Lichine...
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Templar Castle of Gardeny
With the conquest of the city of Lleida in 1149, the Templars received various properties in compensation for their assistance during the siege, including Gardeny Hill. The earliest reference to the Gardeny Command dates from 1156, the first commander being listed as Brother Pere de Cartellà, a figure who had been actively involved in the city siege.
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Lleida Museum
The new home of the Lleida Diocesan and District Museum opened its doors to the public in November 2007, becoming the city's flagship museum. Visitors to its more than 7000 square metres of exhibition space are plunged into the history of Lleida. A story which begins with prehistory and continues up to the modern era.